New Faces XV - Sep 06th 2014

World War I Conference - Aug 30th 2014

ESI: Grieshop on Cookstoves - Sep 12th 2014

ESI: Grieshop on Cookstoves - Sep 12th 2014

Sudan Crisis Simulation Exercise - Oct 25th 2014

Jim Walsh on Current Nuclear Threats - Nov 03rd 2014

Faculty Seminar Series - Dec 04th 2014

Laia Balcells on Low Intensity Intergroup Violence – Dinner Presentation - Jan 16th 2015

Duke LENS Conference: Law in the Era of the “Forever War.” - Mar 01st 2015

You are cordially invited to attend the 21st Annual Center on Law, Ethics and National Security conference at Duke Law School on Friday, 27 Feb and, Saturday, 28 Feb. Topics covered will include: targeting, surveillance, home-grown terrorism, intelligence gathering in the digital age, law of armed conflict issues, and ensuring human rights and civil liberties. Sen. Lindsey Graham (R- SC) will deliver the Friday night keynote address at the Washington Duke Inn. Information about the agenda and registration are found here: http://web.law.duke.edu/lens/conferences/2015/program Please consider that the conference fills up very rapidly, so if you’d like to attend, please register now!

 

Honor Student Dinner Presentations - Apr 16th 2015

Join us to listen to presentations by undergraduates of their honors theses!

A buffet dinner will be served:  Go to EVENT page for further details.

New Faces XVI - Oct 04th 2015

To register, please log on to conference web page.

Gen. Martin Dempsey - Feb 06th 2015

The Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense and the Triangle Institute for Security Studies present:

General Martin Dempsey
“An Address by the 18th Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff”

This event is free and open to the public.

Media wishing to attend should contact Karen Moon (Karen_moon@unc.edu).
All other questions can be directed to Tegan George (tigeorge@live.unc.edu).

*Doors will open 30 minutes prior to the presentation.

Jacques Hymans – Nuclear Disarmament - Feb 06th 2015

“Leaders’ Emotions and Preferences for Nuclear Disarmament”

Reardon – Iran’s Nuclear Policy - Feb 02nd 2015

Reardon Flyer

Robert Reardon, “Iran’s Nuclear Program: Issues and Next Steps.”  An Energy and Security Luncheon

After more than a decade of threats, sanctions, and diplomacy, there is now an unprecedented level of optimism that Iran and the members of the “P5+1” (the five permanent members of the UN Security Council—the United States, Russia, China, France, and the UK—plus Germany) can reach a negotiated settlement to lower tensions and reduce the chances of conflict over Iran’s nuclear program. This talk explores the biggest questions about the current negotiating process and its implications for the future. Can the two sides achieve a deal, and what would such an agreement mean for U.S.-Iran relations? What if negotiations fail? What are the chances of Iran acquiring nuclear weapons, and how much of a threat would that pose to the United States and its allies? What should the United States be prepared to do to stop it?

Dr. Reardon is an assistant professor in the Political Science Department, in the School of Public and International Affairs (SPIA) at NC State. He teaches courses on international relations, international security and war, science and technology policy, and nuclear weapons strategy and proliferation. Dr. Reardon received his PhD from MIT, and has worked on nuclear proliferation policy at Harvard’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and for the RAND Corporation. He is the author of Containing Iran (2012), as well as a number of articles, book chapters, and op-eds on the Iranian nuclear program, and has conducted briefings for U.S. officials on the topic and given numerous media interviews. He has published in International Security, Washington Quarterly, National Interest, and other major academic and policy journals. Reardon is a native Bostonian and remains in denial about last year’s Red Sox season.

Adm. Michael Rogers, NSA – Cybersecurity Conversation - Feb 10th 2015

 

EVENT LANDING PAGE AND REGISTRATION SITE

Registration is not required, but if you wish to reserve a seat, you may do so by logging on to the page above, registering, and printing out a ticket. We will hold reserved seats until 6:50PM.

Doors will open at 6:30 PM.  The Admiral will be introduced at 7:00 PM.

 

Islam and Global Security - Feb 04th 2015

Round Table Discussion Panel
“Islam
&
Global Security”

PANEL MEMBERS:
Mawlid Ali, Imam (Jamaat Ibad ar-Rahman)
Anna Bigelow, Associate Professor of Religious Studies (North Carolina State U.)
Kathryn Fisher, Assist. Prof. of International Security Studies (National Defense U.)
Minnie Sangster, Professor of French (North Carolina Central University)
David Schanzer, Associate Professor of the Practice (Duke University) and
Director, Triangle Center on Terrorism and Homeland Security (Duke-UNC-RTI)

MODERATOR:
Rolin Mainuddin, Associate Professor of Political Science (North Carolina Central U.

Tuesday, February 3, 2015 (6:00 PM – 7:00 PM)

For additional information, please, contact Omar Reyes at oreyes@nccu.edu or call (919) 530-7571.

Krasno Series Ambassadors’ Forum Presents: Ambassador Anne Anderson, Ambassador of the Republic of Ireland to the U.S. - Apr 23rd 2015

Krasno Series Presents: Dr. Jolyon Howorth, Wake Up Europe: Time to Join the New Global Order - Apr 16th 2015

Krasno Series Presents: Dr. Graham Allison, China vs. the U.S.: What does Singapore’s Lee Kuan Yew Say? - Apr 09th 2015

Krasno Series Presents: Dr. Jeffrey Herf, War and Terror against Israel - Mar 26th 2015

Mark Gubrud: “Autonomous Weapons: Information Technology and the Arms Race” - Apr 07th 2015

Iran Reading Group - Mar 27th 2015

A Conversation on Intelligence with Sec. Michael Vickers - Mar 03rd 2015

Michael Vickers DRAFT 2.19

 

Registration is not required but a limited number of seats have been set aside for guests who preregister.

To reserve a seat – go to the event webpage (see above).

 

 

 

 

Iran Reading Group - Apr 10th 2015

“Life After PWAD” Alumni Panel - Feb 14th 2015

Guest lecture from Admiral Michael S. Rogers, Director of the NSA - Feb 10th 2015

Krasno Series Presents: Film screening of “Argentina’s Dirty War and the U.S.: Finding the Missing Grandchildren” - Feb 03rd 2015

PWADAA Dinner - Jan 31st 2015

Krasno Series Presents: Dr. Stephen Rabe, Torture Murder and Genocide: Cold War Memories in Latin America and the U.S. - Jan 29th 2015

Krasno Series Presents: Dr. Nathan Stoltzfus, Hitler’s Management of the Germans: Coercion, Compromise, and the View from Washington - Jan 20th 2015

Phillip Lawson, Mercyhurst University, presenting on MA program in Applied Intelligence - Jan 09th 2015

Richard M. Krasno Professorship Lecture, Dr. Bill Brands - Nov 20th 2014

WWI Centenary Project presents Jennifer Keene, “The War for Combatants” - Nov 19th 2014

Duke-UNC Gender, War and Culture Series: Karen Petrone: “Gendering War Memories: The First World War in Eastern European Memory” - Nov 14th 2014

Richard M. Krasno Professorship Lecture, Ambassadors Forum with Jack F. Matlock - Nov 14th 2014

Duke-UNC Gender, War and Culture Series: Sarah Stein and Kristina Bell: “Rape in the U.S. Military” - Nov 08th 2014

Duke-UNC Gender, War and Culture Series: “The Invisible War” film screening - Nov 07th 2014

Richard M. Krasno Professorship Lecture, Dr. Robert Litwak - Nov 04th 2014

Richard M. Krasno Professorship Lecture, Dr. Gerhard Weinberg - Oct 28th 2014

2014 International Strategic Crisis Negotiations Exercise (Sudan), registration required - Oct 26th 2014

TISS/UNC presents: “The US Pivot to Asia-Pacific” Lawrence E. Grinter, PhD - Oct 22nd 2014

Duke-UNC Gender, War and Culture Series: CHÉRIE RIVERS NDALIKO: “A LOOK THAT KILLS” - Oct 10th 2014

Richard M. Krasno Professorship Lecture, Dr. Randall Woods - Oct 07th 2014

George Herring (University of Kentucky): Looking Back, Thinking Ahead – U.S. Foreign Policy in Perspective - Apr 17th 2014

The Richard M. Krasno Distinguished Professorship presents: George C. Herring
as part of the “U.S. in World Affairs: The Cold War and Beyond” Lecture Series

Professor Herring is one of the nation’s foremost experts on the Vietnam War, and his research centered on U.S. foreign relations. Herring retired after thirty-six years at the University of Kentucky, including eleven as chair of the Department of History. He was visiting professor at the U.S. Military Academy and the University of Richmond, as well as a Fulbright Scholar in New Zealand.

His most recent work is “From Colony to Superpower: American Foreign Relations Since 1776.” Other published works include “The Diaries of Edward R. Stettinius;” “America’s Longest War: The United States and Vietnam, 1950-1975;” “The Secret Diplomacy of the Vietnam War: The “Negotiating Volumes” of the Pentagon Papers;” and “LBJ and Vietnam: A Different Kind of War.”

“Nuclear Intelligence” - Apr 11th 2014

“Asian Non-Proliferation” - Apr 10th 2014

Stephen Zunes (University of San Francisco): Luncheon Discussion “Syria: Are There Still Nonviolent Alternatives?” - Apr 09th 2014

Please join us for a Luncheon Discussion with Dr. Stephen Zunes on effective non-violent tactics and responses to the crisis in Syria.

Dr. Stephen Zunes is a Professor of Politics and International Studies at the University of San Francisco, where he serves as coordinator of the program in Middle Eastern Studies. Recognized as one the country’s leading scholars of U.S. Middle East policy and of strategic nonviolent action, Professor Zunes serves as a senior policy analyst for the Foreign Policy in Focus project of the Institute for Policy Studies, an associate editor of Peace Review, a contributing editor of Tikkun, and co-chair of the academic advisory committee for the International Center on Nonviolent Conflict.

RSVP Here: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AiKglXpUD5cmdDRLQU94Tm5PR00ySE1OWnM0QjVHTlE&usp=sharing

Cherie Rivers Ndaliko (UNC-Chapel Hill): “A Look that Kills”: Representations of Gender and Sexual Violence in the Currect Conflict in Congo” - Apr 05th 2014

Chérie Rivers Ndaliko is an interdisciplinary scholar who studies radical arts interventions in conflict regions of Africa through ethnomusicology, film studies, and cultural theory. Her work centers on film and music as catalysts of movements of socio-political transformation as well as on the ethics and aesthetics of humanitarian aid in the east of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. In this context she devotes particular attention to youth and gender politics. Beyond her academic engagement with issues of audio-visual representation, power, and resistance, she also advocates socially engaged scholarship and was a pioneer of Harvard University’s Social Engagement Initiative during her graduate training. Her forthcoming book offers a new paradigm for considering cultural radicalism and resistance in the face of humanitarian crises.

She is also a composer and pianist who holds a B.M. in film scoring from the Berklee College of Music, an A.M. from Harvard University in Ethnomusicology, and a Ph.D. from Harvard University in African Studies. In addition to her teaching and research, she also serves as co-director of the Yole!Africa cultural center in Goma, executive director of the Salaam Kivu International Film Festival, and faculty advisory for Yole!Africa U.S.

Ambassador Thomas Pickering: The US & the EU: Dealing with Iran and Syria - Mar 28th 2014

The Richard M. Krasno Distinguished Professorship at UNC Chapel Hill has the Pleasure to Present: Ambassador Thomas R. Pickering as part of the “Ambassadors Forum” Lecture Series

Ambassador Pickering is vice chairman of Hills & Company, an international consulting firm providing advice to U.S. businesses on investment, trade, and risk assessment issues abroad, particularly in emerging market economies. He retired in 2006 as senior vice president international relations for Boeing. He has had a career spanning five decades as a U.S. diplomat, serving as under secretary of state for political affairs, ambassador to the United Nations, ambassador to Russia, India, Israel, Nigeria, Jordan and El Salvador. He also served on assignments in Zanzibar and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. He holds the personal rank of Career Ambassador, the highest in the U.S. Foreign Service. He has held numerous other positions at the State Department, including executive secretary and special assistant to Secretaries Rogers and Kissinger and assistant secretary for the bureau of oceans, environmental and scientific affairs. He is based in Washington, DC.

Prof. Guenter Bischof (University of New Orleans) – George H.W. Bush & the End of the Cold War in Eastern Europe: The Acceleration of History in 1989 - Mar 05th 2014

The Richard M. Krasno Distinguished Professorship at UNC Chapel Hill has the Pleasure to Present: Prof. Guenter Bischof (University of New Orleans) as part of the “Cold War and Beyond” Lecture Series.

Bischof will be discussing “George H.W. Bush & the End of the Cold War in Eastern Europe: The Acceleration of History in 1989”

Gűnter Bischof, Ph.D., is a native of Austria and graduate of the Universities of Innsbruck, New Orleans, and Harvard. He is a University Research Professor of History, the Marshall Plan Professor and Director of CenterAustria at the University of New Orleans; he served as a visiting professor at the Universities of Munich, Innsbruck, Salzburg, Vienna, LSU, Liberal Arts University in Moscow, and the Economics Universities of Vienna and Prague; he is the author of Austria in the First Cold War, 1945/55 (1999), co-editor of the series Contemporary Austrian Studies (21 volumns) and TRANSATLANICA (7 volumns). He also coedited another 20 books on topics of international contemporary history (esp. World War II and the Cold War in Central Europe).

Beyond the Headlines: Crisis in Ukraine - Mar 05th 2014

An Informal Discussion on the growing crisis in the Ukraine
Featuring:
– Dr. Graeme Robertson | Associate Professor Political Science, UNC
– Dr. Oleh Wolowyna | Vice-President of Ukrainian Association of North Carolina
– Dr. Vitaliy Strohush | Assistant Professor of Economics, Elon University
– Trevor Erlacher | Ph.D. Candidate in History, UNC
– Moderator: Dr. Robert Jenkins | Director CSEEES

Sponsored by the Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies
http://cseees.unc.edu – 919.962.0901

5:00 – 7:00 pm • UNC Chapel Hill • Institute for Arts and Humanities • Hyde Hall - Mar 03rd 2014

Friederike Bruhofener (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill): “Negotiating Gay Rights, Youth Protection and Combat Readiness: The West German Bundeswehr and the Reform of the Criminal Code” - Mar 03rd 2014

Between 1969 and 1973, the § 175 of the West German Criminal Code, which penalized male homosexuality, was liberalized. This reform was greatly influenced by political considerations about how it would affect the West German armed forces—the Bundeswehr. Jurists, politicians and military brass intensively discussed the possible effects of a liberalization of the §175 on the relation between younger soldiers and older officers. The main point of contention was the question whether the decriminalization of male homosexuality or the “protection” of young soldiers and the military’s combat readiness should take precedence.
FRIEDERIKE BRÜHÖFENER is a doctoral candidate in European History in the Department of History at UNC-Chapel Hill. She is currently finishing her dissertation thesis titled “Defining the West German Soldier: Military, Society and Masculinity in West Germany, 1945-1989.

Michael Geyer (University of Chicago): “An Age of Destruction: World War I One Hundred Years Later” - Feb 21st 2014

If World War I was a European war over the future of the world, the futures of the world that emerged from the age of destruction were unlike anything the belligerents, high and low, had expected. How could this happen? An answer to this question hinges on understanding the peculiar “totalizing” energy of the war, which was unleashed in 1914 and crashed through legal, political and “civilizational” hedges that had meant to contain violence – away from bourgeois society and beyond the European world. It also depends on making sense of an age of destruction – a yet more deadly war, a forty-year war-in-sight confrontation in Europe and the violent ends of empire – that emerged from World War I.

The lecture will be led by Michael E. Geyer, Samuel N. Harper Professor of German and European History and faculty director of the Human Rights Program at the University of Chicago. This event is free and open to the public.

Please see pwad.unc.edu/events for more information

Workshop: Gender, War and Empire in a Global Perspective - Feb 21st 2014

This workshop is devoted to an exploration of the centrality of empire to the involvement of Europe and the Americas in wars during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It will discuss wars over the creation and extension of imperial domains and their impact on colonized peoples as well as the colonizers, the involvement of imperial subjects and colonized people in primarily European wars, and the armed struggles for self-determination that followed in the wake of those wars. It will explore
the role of gender in distinguishing the rulers from the ruled as well as in the gendered politics involved in the militarization of civil society in pre-war as well as war-time society. It will also consider the consequences of imperial wars and wars of decolonization for gender relations among both colonized and colonizers.

THE CASE OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE:
Imperial Manhood and Colonial Subordination: The Gendered Politics of War
Marilyn Lake (The University of Melbourne)

Sexual Violence: Locating the Nexus of Gender, War and Colonialism
Angela Woollacott (Australian National University)

The Politics of Service and Sacrifice in World War I Ireland and India
Sonya O. Rose (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor / Birkbeck, University of London)

ROUNDTABLE: COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVES
Amy S. Greenberg (Penn State University) • Mischa Honeck (GHI, Washington D.C.) • Don Reid and Susan Pennybacker (UNC-Chapel Hill) • Susan Thorne (Duke University)

Co-Conveners: UNC-Chapel Hill: Center for European Studies, Department of History, Department of Women’s and Gender Studies, Institute for Arts and Humanities • Duke University: Center for European Studies, Department of History • Research Triangle Series on the History of Military, War and Society • Triangle Institute for Security Studies • German Historical Institute Washington D.C.

Prof. Randall B. Woods (University of Arkansas): THE CIA & VIETNAM: William B. Colby and the ‘other war’ - Feb 12th 2014

THE RICHARD M KRASNO DISTINGUISHED PROFESSORSHIP @ UNC Chapel HIll presents Prof. Randall B. Woods (University of Arkansas): THE CIA & VIETNAM: William B. Colby and the ‘other war’

Randall Woods received his Ph.D. from the University of Texas. In 1985 he was named John A. Cooper Professor of American History and in 1996 was promoted to Distinguished Professor. Woods has served as Associate Dean, Interim Dean, and Dean of Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences. He has published seven books, most notably, Fulbright: A Biography (Cambridge, 1995), which was nominated for both the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award and which won the Ferrell and Ledbetter Prizes. In 2006, the Free Press published LBJ: Architect of American Ambition. Prof. Woods was selected to be both Mary Ball Washington Distinguished Professor at University College, Dublin and the Fulbright 50th Anniversary Chair at the University of Bonn.

For all our previous talks & lectures, see our YOU TUBE channel
— www.youtube.com/KrasnoUNC —

Luncheon with Yaniv Barzilai (U.S. Department of State) – “102 Days of War: How Osama bin Laden, al Qaeda & the Taliban Survived 2001” - Feb 11th 2014

During the early hours of May 2, 2011, the elite U.S. Navy special operations unit known as SEAL Team Six famously hunted and killed Osama bin Laden at his personal three-story compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan. Less known, however, is that nearly a decade earlier, and just three months after the September 11 attack on the World Trade Center, the United States had found and cornered Osama bin Laden in the eastern mountains of Tora Bora, Afghanistan, only to then watch him and his al Qaeda and Taliban affiliates escape into Pakistan. In his new book, 102 Days of War – How Osama bin Laden, al Qaeda & the Taliban Survived 2001 (Potomac Books, 2014), U.S. Foreign Service Officer Yaniv Barzilai provides a detailed account of the failures in tactics, policy and leadership that enabled such an escape in December 2001 (Brookings Intelligence Project).

Yaniv Barzilai is a UNC alumnus and former Peace, War, and Defense Major (Class of 2011). He is a Thomas R. Pickering Foreign Affairs Fellow and has his masters from the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) at the Johns Hopkins University. While on his fellowship he was Staff Assistant to the Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan, and worked as an intern & Political/Military Officer in the Somali Affairs Unit in Nairobi, Kenya. Yaniv is now a member of the foreign service and is coming to UNC as a part of his book tour.

Please join us for a luncheon with Yaniv Barzilai, as he discusses his new book and answers questions about his career and research.

To RSVP please fill in the Google Doc: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AiKglXpUD5cmdEhyWXpwa2xyQ0p5Um5mbUZxeEprcFE&usp=sharing

This event is cosponsored with the UNC Center for Global Initiatives and Honors Carolina.

Book Signing: Yaniv Barzilai – “102 Days of War” - Feb 11th 2014

In his new book, “102 Days of War – How Osama bin Laden, al Qaeda & the Taliban Survived 2001” (Potomac Books, 2014), U.S. Foreign Service Officer Yaniv Barzilai provides a detailed account of the failures in tactics, policy and leadership that enabled such an escape in December 2001 (Brookings Intelligence Project).

Join us for an exclusive talk and book signing with Yaniv at UNC Student Stores.

Mary Beth Chopas (UNC, Chapel Hill) – Law, Security, and Ethnic Profiling: Italians in the United States during World War II - Feb 08th 2014

Research Triangle Seminar Series on the “HISTORY OF THE MILITARY, WAR, AND SOCIETY”
Co-Convenor: Triangle Institute for Security Studies.

invites you to attend

Mary Beth Chopas (UNC, Chapel Hill)
Law, Security, and Ethnic Profiling: Italians in the United States during World War II

The paper explores the federal government’s policies of selective internment and other restrictions on Italians residing in the United States during World War II. Through legal analysis of the processes for examining aliens prior to internment, it fills a gap in the historical scholarship that has focused on narratives of people affected by wartime policies. Based on the case files for 343 Italian civilian internees, the paper argues that the U.S. government disregarded civil liberties in the implementation of national security policies. By the time it corrected its policies, many had already suffered the disgrace of being treated like enemies without justification.

Mary Beth Chopas received her PhD in History from UNC-Chapel Hill in 2013. Her research interests include military, legal, and twentieth-century American history, with a focus on the balancing of national security interests with the protection of civil liberties. She has taught at several law schools, including Harvard and UNC. She has published articles in law journals and co-authored a treatise on mercantile law.

Refreshments will be served.

A pre-circulated paper is available at fbruehoe@email.unc.edu
For more information see: www.unc.edu/mhss/

The Organizers in 2013-14:
Dirk Bönker, Duke University
Karen Hagemann, UNC at Chapel Hill
Susanna Lee, NC State University (Speaker)
Wayne Lee, UNC at Chapel Hill
Adriane Lentz-Smith, Duke University (Speaker)

Main Contacts:
Susanna Lee (NC State University) at susanna_lee@ncsu.edu
Adriane Lentz-Smith (Duke University) at adl16@duke.edu

Hasan Kwame Jeffries: Civil Rights and Civil Wrongs – North Carolina and the Struggle for Justice and Equality - Feb 06th 2014

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill presents

The Tenth Annual African American History Month Lecture: Civil Rights and Civil Wrongs: North Carolina and the Struggle for Justice and Equality by Hasan Kwame Jeffries

Author of Bloody Lowndes: Civil Rights and Black Power in Alabama’s Black Belt
For more information, visit https://history.unc.edu/event/civil-rights-civil-wrongs-north-carolina-struggle-justice-equality/

Navigating the Fog of War: Emerging Issues in the Law of Armed Conflict and International Security - Feb 01st 2014

The North Carolina Journal of International Law and Commercial Regulation presents its annual symposium: “Navigating the Fog of War: Emerging Issues in the Law of Armed Conflict and International Security.”

With the help of leading experts in the field, we will examine how developments in modern warfare and security practices interact with and challenge the limits of the law. Panels will address such issues as cyber warfare and terrorist prosecution while individual speakers will discuss the future of the law of armed conflict and a return to the war/crime paradigm after 12 years of war.

The event will be held on Friday, January 31 at the Friday Center from 8:00am-3:30pm. Please click the LINK for registration and a full schedule of the day’s events: http://www.law.unc.edu/calendar/event.aspx?cid=90979

Prof. Robert McMahon (Ohio State University) Fragile Partnerships:The U.S. and its ASIAN Allies from the Cold War to the Present - Jan 31st 2014

THE RICHARD M KRASNO DISTINGUISHED PROFESSORSHIP presents:

Prof. Robert McMahon (Ohio State University)
Fragile Partnerships:The U.S. and its ASIAN Allies from the Cold War to the Present

Hamilton Hall, Rm. 569, 4.00pm — ALL WELCOME
[metered parking: at Morehead Planetarium]

For all our previous talks & lectures, see our YOU TUBE channel
— www.youtube.com/KrasnoUNC —

Kara Dixon Vuic (High Point University): “Look, But Don’t Touch”: American Women as Military Entertainment” - Jan 25th 2014

In every twentieth century war the U.S. military sent women entertainers to warzones. They opened canteens where soldiers could find a friendly face, performed on stage, played games and engaged in conversation, and brought a momentary reprieve from the war to the battlefield. This presentation examines the history of these programs, the military’s intentions for the women, and the meanings women ascribed to their work. It reveals the ways that feminine sexuality formed a central part of the state’s efforts to maintain an effective fighting force, construct martial masculinity, mobilize homefront support, and export American culture to foreign countries.

Kara Dixon Vuic is Associate Professor of History at High Point University. A historian of gender and the U.S. military, she is the author of Officer, Nurse, Woman: The Army Nurse Corps in the Vietnam War (2010). She is writing a history of military and civilian agencies’ use of women to entertain American troops during World Wars I and II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and recent wars in the Middle East.

Refreshments will be served after the seminar.
For more information see: http://gwc.web.unc.edu/

Presented By: DUKE-UNC “GENDER, WAR AND CULTURE” SERIES in cooperation with the Research Triangle Seminar Series on the History of Military, War, and Society

Organizers of the GWC Series:
Karen Hagemann (Speakers) (UNC Chapel Hill, History Department) in cooperation with:
Dirk Bonker (Duke University, History Department)
Annegret Fauser (UNC Chapel Hill, Music Department)
Ariana Vigil (UNC Chapel Hill, Department) of Women’s and Gender Studies)
Main Contact: Karen Hagemann at hagemann@unc.edu

Last Day of Exams - Dec 14th 2013

Thomas Sheppard (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill): “To Make an Impression of Our National Character”: Civil-Military Relations and the Tripolitan War, 1801-1805″ - Dec 07th 2013

From 1801-1805, the United States waged a costly and only partially successful war with Tripoli. While the United States fought the Tripolitan War in large measure to redeem its national honor, naval officers routinely took actions in defense of their personal honor that hindered the war effort. Young midshipmen and lieutenants slew each other in duels over trifling causes, while senior officers put the service at risk in vicious quarrels over relative rank and perceived insults. Officers of the early United States Navy, while they valued the ideals of subordination, civilian control, and duty, often proved unwilling to submit to orders they feared would damage their reputations.

Thomas Sheppard is a PhD candidate in History at the University of North Carolina. He was awarded a 2013-2014 Smith-Richardson Pre-doctoral Fellowship at Yale University and currently resides in New Haven, Connecticut. His research focuses on civil-military relations in the early U.S. Navy.

Refreshments will be served.

A pre-circulated paper is now available at fbruehoe@email.unc.edu
For more information see: www.unc.edu/mhss/

The Organizers in 2013-14:
Dirk Bönker, Duke University
Karen Hagemann, UNC at Chapel Hill
Susanna Lee, NC State University (Speaker)
Wayne Lee, UNC at Chapel Hill
Adriane Lentz-Smith, Duke University (Speaker)

Presented by Research Triangle Seminar Series on the “HISTORY OF THE MILITARY, WAR, AND SOCIETY”
Co-Convenor: Triangle Institute for Security Studies.

Last Day of Classes - Dec 05th 2013

Karen Hagemann (UNC-CH): “Heroes, Horror and Hunger: The Battle of Leipzig in October 1813 – Experiences and Memories” - Nov 25th 2013

On 16 and 19 October 1813 the largest battle in history before World War I took place in Leipzig and its Saxon hinterland. It decided the fate of Europe by leading to the end of the Napoleonic Empire. Although the military history of the Napoleonic Wars has been thoroughly researched, we still know relatively little about how it affected civilians. This lecture seeks to rectify that imbalance by exploring what the new forms of warfare with mass armies mobilized by national propaganda meant for civilians. It will argue that unless we take these varied experiences and their contested interpretations into account, we cannot hope to understand why events like the battle of Leipzig came to occupy such a prominent place in regional, national and European memory.

KAREN HAGEMANN is the James G. Kenan Distinguished Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She has published widely in Modern German and European history. Her most recent books include War Memories: The Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars in Modern European Culture (ed. with Alan Forrest and Etienne François, 2012/2013). Currently she is finishing a monograph titled Revisiting Prussia’s Wars Against Napoleon: History, Culture, Memory for Cambridge University Press.

Refreshments will be served after the seminar.
For more information see: www.unc.edu/ncgs

Sponsored by:
The North Carolina German Studies Seminar Series
In conjunction with the
Research Triangle Seminar Series on the History of Military, War, and Society

Organizers of the HMWS Series:
Susanna Michele Lee (NC State University, Department of History)
Adriane Lentz-Smith (Duke University, Department of History)

Organizers of the NCGS-Series:
Karen Hagemann (UNC Chapel Hill, Department of History) (Speaker)
Dirk Bonker (Duke University, Department of History)
William Collins Donahue (Duke University, Department of Germanic Languages)
Konrad Jarausch (UNC Chapel Hill, Department of History)

The HMWS Seminar Series is sponsored by:
The Duke Department of History
The UNC Department of History
Triangle Institute for Security Studies

The NCGS Seminar Series is sponsored by:
Carolina Seminars
The Carolina-Duke Ph.D. Program in German Studies
The UNC-Chapel Hill Institute for the Arts and Humanities
The UNC Center for European Studies
The UNC Department of History
The UNC Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures
The Duke Center for European Studies
The Duke Departments of Germanic Languages and Literatures
The Duke Department of History

Operation Anaconda Staff Ride - Nov 23rd 2013

The event is modeled on the military “staff ride,” a traditional tool of military education that seeks to understand conflict from the bottom up rather than the top down; participants play the roles of leaders at many points on the battlefield and at many echelons of command, recreating and reflecting upon the decisions made in the moment, with the information available, and by the individual on the spot. It is a “virtual” staff ride in that it employs modern graphics and technology to “walk the terrain” — and to feel the “fog of war” — through Operation Anaconda, the culminating encounter from the initial U.S. invasion of Afghanistan in 2002.

Pizza and light refreshments will be provided.
Registration DEADLINE: 11/11/2013
Register: https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07e8d0d1nb9852cba7&oseq=&c=&ch=

Dr. Rula Quawas – Voices of Young Jordanian Women: Speaking the Unspeakable - Nov 22nd 2013

Voices of Young Jordanian Women: Speaking the Unspeakable: A lecture by Dr. Rula Quawas
Professor, Department of English, University of Jordan

Based in part on her experience teaching feminist theory and mentoring women students at the University of Jordan, Dr. Quawas will discuss three initiatives by young Jordanian activists to combat violence against women.

Sponsored by The Department of Asian Studies, Department of Peace, War, and Defense, Center for Global Initiatives, Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, and Duke-UNC Middle East Consortium.

This event is free and open to the public.
For more information contact Nadia Yaqub at yaqub@email.unc.edu

A Dwindling Band of Witnesses: Esther Lederman’s Story of Holocaust Survivors - Nov 21st 2013

The brave Esther Lederman has offered to share her story with the UNC-Chapel Hill community. Esther escaped Nazi-occupied Poland at a young age, lived in hiding for almost 2 years, and bore the tragedy of losing family members.

All students are encouraged to attend, especially because such an opportunity won’t be available in the future.The event is planned for Wednesday, November 20th at 5:30 pm at the Stone Center Auditorium. There is no admission fee.For questions, contact Sam Asofsky at (asofsky@live.unc.edu)

Please feel free to invite others! Also, try to arrive 10 minutes early, so as not to disturb the speaker once the event has started.

King’s College Study Aborad Info Session - Nov 21st 2013

King’s College London study abroad information session.

With KCL student ambassador Cameron Dunne and UNC Study Abroad Northern Europe & Oceania Programs Director Emily Marlton

Prof. Carolyn Eisenberg (Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY): “Nixon, Kissinger & the National Security State: Cold War Lessons for the post-Cold War World - Nov 20th 2013

The Richard M. Krasno Distinguished Professorship @ Chapel Hill presents Prof. Carolyn Eisenberg on “Nixon, Kissinger & the National Security State: Cold War
Lessons for the post-Cold War World.” This event is part of the “Cold War and Beyond” lecture series.

Carolyn Eisenberg is a Professor of History at Hofstra University. She specializes in 20th Century History and the policy of Richard Nixon, and has written books on US relations with a divided Germany during the Cold War. She was also the co-chair of the Legislative Working group for United for Peace and Justice.

All lectures can be viewed on our youtube channel
www.youtube.com/KrasnoUNC

U.S. Army War College International Strategic Crisis Negotiations Exercise - Nov 17th 2013

The UNC-TISS National Security Fellowship Program has again partnered with the U.S. Army War College, the UNC Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense, and the Duke Counterterrorism and Public Policy Fellowship Program to bring an International Strategic Crisis Negotiations Exercise to UNC Chapel Hill on November 15-16, 2013 (see attached brochure). This simulation is open to all undergraduate and graduate students. Faculty interested in participating should contact Jenny Akin (Jennifer.akin@duke.edu) for additional information.

REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED FOR THIS EVENT. PLEASE REGISTER HERE:
http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07e8d0fgnv002b02e2&llr=6qfh5neab

The exercise simulates an international crisis situation and is free play and open-ended, but is also run under a tight and rigid schedule. The schedule is designed to force the students to stop and think (which they might not do if left to their own devices), rather than hurtle from one negotiation session to another, in order to allow themselves the time to evaluate the negotiations that just took place, assess how that changes things, determine what their next moves need to be, and set up the next set of negotiations. Unlike last year, this scenario will take into account existing international laws of the sea, offering the opportunity for students to gain a new skill in navigating a complex legal system while also trying to achieve policy objectives. The exercise is structured to run from 4:30 – 10 pm on a Friday evening and from 8:00 am – 2:00 pm on Saturday in order to minimize conflicts with other classes or events. Additionally, U.S. Army War College Fellows currently taking courses at UNC and Duke will join seasoned area Diplomats as mentors for each team.

Location: Hamilton Hall and Murphy Hall, UNC-Chapel Hill

Topic: The looming crisis in the South China Sea

This scenario simulates the current conflict between South China Sea claimant states of the People’s Republic of China, Vietnam and the Philippines, in order to examine the rights of the three nations within the Sea. It also examines the rights of all nations within this international body of water. Reflecting current tensions and actions, the crisis is triggered by an incident in which a Chinese patrol boat fires on an Indian oil exploration vessel operating within the Philippine-claimed Exclusive Economic Zone within the South China Sea, with subsequent loss of life. The UN Security Council passes a resolution, albeit under Chinese and Russian abstention, that mandates immediate talks to seek a reduction in tensions, the resolution of issues through peaceful negotiation, and to establish a multilateral approach to resolving future issues and claims. This brings the claimant nations of China, Vietnam, and the Philippines to the negotiation table. Joining them in Jakarta, to begin UN-mandated talks in an effort to find a diplomatic solution to what has become a rapidly deteriorating situation, are regional powers, Japan and India; the United States, as the recognized balancing power; and the host nation of Indonesia, representing the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN).

Schedule (subject to change): 4:30 – 10:00 pm (November 15, 2013); 8:00 am – 2:00 pm (November 16, 2013)

Format: Seven teams will comprise the following participants: China, Vietnam, the Philippines, Japan, India, the United States, and Indonesia.

For additional information regarding this event, please contact Jennifer Akin (Jennifer.akin@duke.edu). Please also note that the event sponsors will be providing dinner on 11/15 and both breakfast and lunch on 11/16. Parking will not be reserved for traveling guests, but the UNC campus offers a wide variety of options after 5:00 pm on Friday.

Prof. Thomas A. Schwartz (Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN) “Rock Star Diplomacy: Henry Kissinger, the Media, and the Politics of American Foreign Policy” - Nov 15th 2013

The Richard M. Krasno Distinguished Professorship @ Chapel Hill presents Prof. Thomas A. Schwartz on “Rock Star Diplomacy: Henry Kissinger, the Media, and the Politics of American Foreign Policy.” This event is part of the “Cold War and Beyond” lecture series.

Thomas Alan Schwartz is a historian of the foreign relations of the United States, with related interests in Modern European history and the history of international relations. He is currently working on two books: a biography of former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, tentatively entitled, “Henry Kissinger and the Dilemmas of American Power,” and “The Long Twilight Struggle: A Concise History of the Cold War.” Professor Schwartz has held fellowships from the Social Science Research Council, the German Historical Society, the Norwegian Nobel Institute, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and the Center for the Study of European Integration. He has served as President of the Society of Historians of American Foreign Relations. He served on the United States Department of State’s Historical Advisory Committee as the representative of the Organization of American Historians from 2005-2008.

All lectures can be viewed on our youtube channel
www.youtube.com/KrasnoUNC

War, Love, and Madness Film Series: “Circles” - Nov 15th 2013

Please join us for a special screening of the Serbian film CIRCLES (Krugovi). We are delighted to bring the film to campus in the wake of its recent festival successes (Sundance, Berlin Film Festival, Sarajevo Film Festival), and its potential Oscar nomination for best foreign film. The screening is part of the War, Love, and Madness film series organized by the Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages.

Synopsis:

Bosnia and Herzegovina, 1993. Marko, a Serbian soldier on home leave, returns to his village to visit Nada, his fiancée. When he sees three army comrades mishandling Haris, a Muslim shopkeeper, Marko bravely intervenes. The consequences of his civil courage continue to be felt by Marko’s family and friends 12 years later, when the war is long over. The film unfolds as a triptych, exploring the moral convolutions and complex story strands that emerge from that one fateful moment. With its gorgeous cinematography and simmering tension, Srdan Golubovic’s third feature (The Trap, 2007, garnered great acclaim) employs a multifaceted, yet simple, structure that contemplates revenge, redemption, and reconciliation. Aware of how easily hatred and violence can create life-shattering ripples, Goluboviç looks at the consequences of moral courage, asking whether a heroic act can generate ripples of another kind.

Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OJK-IqygBls

This screening is made possible with the support from the Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and the Slavic & East European Library Collections.

Hope to see you there!

Lecture series featuring Dr. Erez Manela: “An Indispensable Nation: Recovering FDR’s Vision for China’s Global Role” - Nov 14th 2013

China is a great power in the making and the country most likely to challenge the United States geopolitically in the decades to come. This talk by one of America’s premier scholars of international history focuses on how lessons from the past can help Americans understand China’s role in the world today.

Erez Manela is Professor of History at Harvard University. He is the author of The Wilsonian Moment: Self-Determination and the International Origins of Anti-Colonial Nationalism (2007), and co-editor of Shock of the Global: The 1970s in Perspective (2010).

For further information contact Mary Lindsley (mary.lindsley@duke.edu) or Alexandra Pfadt (alexandra.pfadt@duke.edu).

Hosted by The Sanford School of Public Policy and the Duke Program in American Grand Strategy

Mischa Honeck (German Historical Institute, Washington DC) “For the Preservation of German Honor and Manhood”: Gender and the German-American War for the Union - Nov 09th 2013

Many German-speaking migrants fought in the American Civil War. This lecture argues that a particular construction of masculinity motivated them to fight against slavery and secession. The transnational legacy of the European Revolution of 1848 and the divisive politics of the 1850s and 1860s devalued compromise, militarized German-American culture, and nurtured an ideal of manhood that flaunted ethnic honor, principle, and sacrifice as its defining characteristics. Emotional and cultural factors pertaining to gender were at least as important in shaping the meaning of military service as “ideology” in the abstract.

MISCHA HONECK is a research fellow for North American history at the German Historical Institute in Washington, D.C. His main research interests are the histories of race and ethnicity, gender, and youth. He is the coeditor of Germany and the Black Diaspora: Points of Contact, 1250-1914 (2013), and the author of We Are the Revolutionists: German-Speaking Immigrants and American Abolitionists after 1848 (2011).

Film Screening and Discussion: “The Act of Killing” - Nov 06th 2013

A film screening and discussion with Leslie Dwyer and Degung Santikarma (School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, GMU)

Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1kssnOoJ93I&feature=youtu.be
Website: http://theactofkilling.com/

Leslie Dwyer is Director of the Center for the Study of Gender and Conflict at the School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution at George Mason University. She is a cultural anthropologist with a PhD from Princeton who has been working in Indonesia since 1993. Her research focuses on issues of violence, gender, post-conflict social life, transitional justice, and the politics of memory and identity.

Degung Santikarma is a Research Fellow at the School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution at George Mason University. As an anthropologist/human rights activist from Bali, he has been active in efforts to address the legacies of mass violence in Indonesia, especially the state-sponsored massacres of 1965-66.

Made possible with support from the Center for Global Initiatives and Carolina Asia Center.

Homeland Security and Muslim Americans: A Discussion with George Selim - Nov 05th 2013

Responsible for the federal government’s efforts to engage with Muslim American communities to address homeland security priorities, Mr. Selim will engage in a discussion with students about a wide range of homeland security issues relating to engagement, community relations, and homegrown terrorism issues. This meeting will provide students with a unique opportunity to discuss the federal government’s role and efforts in achieving its national security objectives.

This event will be hosted by the Triangle Center on Terrorism and Homeland Security & the Dewitt Wallace Center for Media and Democracy. It will be co-sponsored by the Duke Program in American Grand Strategy and the Triangle Institute for Security Studies.

For more information contact Alexandra Pfadt at Alexandra.pfadt@duke.edu.

RSVP by Wednesday, 10/30/13. To RSVP: https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07e8edq9dpe01339a3&oseq=&c=&ch=

Tom Donilon and Bart Gellman: Foreign Policy, National Security and You - Oct 31st 2013

A public conversation with Tom Donilon, the Obama National Security Advisor who oversaw the hunt for Osama bin laden, and Bart Gellman, the two-time Pulitzer Prize winning journalist who obtained information from Edward Snowden to reveal expansive government surveillance of domestic phone and email records. Hodding Carter will be moderating.

Free parking in Bell Tower deck after 5.

China Town Hall: Madeleine K. Albright Speaks on China’s Rapid Development and Sino-American Relations - Oct 29th 2013

Madeleine Albright. UNC Professor Yong Cai. US-China Relations. Are you keen on hearing these two brilliant individuals speak on that subject?

The Carolina China Network, UNC’s academic hub organization for all things China, is honored to invite you to a premier webcast called China Town Hall on Monday, October 28 from 6:45 – 8:30pm at the FedEx Global Center in Nelson Mandela Auditorium. The event is free to all UNC students, faculty, and the public!

Broadcasting to 60 locations nationally, Albright, the first female Secretary of State, will be expounding upon China’s rapid development and Sino-American relations. At the conclusion of her talk, you have the opportunity for a live Q&A with the dynamic leader. Then Professor of Sociology, Yong Cai, will present on China’s unfolding demographic and population trends. Take a look at his incredible background here: http://www.unc.edu/~caiyong/caiyong.cv.pdf.

The event will be entirely in English (no Chinese skills needed!) and students of all academic disciplines are strongly encouraged to attend. Please send any questions to carolinachinanetwork@gmail.com.

Lawrence Grinter: “Kim Jong-Un and North Korean Nuclear Policy” - Oct 23rd 2013

TISS / NCSU ESI are happy to invite you to an evening talk on the NCSU campus featuring Lawrence Grinter, US Air War College (Retired) speaking on Kim Jong-Un and North Korean Nuclear Policy.

Lawrence Grinter (Ph.D. University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill) has just retired from his position as the Professor of Asian Studies, Department of International Studies, Air War College, Maxwell Air Force Base. He has co-edited and co-authored a number of books and scholarly articles on Asian security issues, to include the Vietnam war, Air Theory for the 21st century (Cyber, Biological Weapons, and Germ Warfare), and nuclear proliferation concerns in North Korea.

Register here: http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07e8ab13nt3ba233af&llr=6qfh5neab

Sponsored by TISS

Tony Allan (King’s College London): Who Determines the Demand for Food and Who Manages Water? - Oct 23rd 2013

Global Research Institute Water Nexus Series: Water and Security
WHO DETERMINES THE DEMAND FOR FOOD AND WHO MANAGES WATER?

Tony Allan, King’s College London

Professor Allan, who has been credited with introducing the concept of “virtual water” into global water discussions, will highlight the role of the demand for food and the choices consumers make in determining whether society can manage sustainably the water resources on which food security depends.

Tony Allan heads the London Water Research Group at King’s College London and SOAS. Please see PWAD events page for more details on pwad.unc.edu

Prof. David Painter, (Georgetown University, Washington, DC) “Oil & Politics: the Oil Crises of the 1970s and Beyond” - Oct 23rd 2013

The Richard M. Krasno Distinguished Professorship @ Chapel Hill presents Prof. David Painter on “Oil & Politics: the Oil Crises of the 1970s and Beyond”. This event is part of the “Cold War and Beyond” lecture series.

David S. Painter teaches international history at Georgetown University. His work focuses on the political economy of US foreign relations, especially as it relates to the international oil industry. He is a past Director of Graduate Studies in the History Department, and was the founding Director of the Master of Arts in Global, Comparative, and International History program. In spring 2008, he was a visiting fellow at the Norwegian Nobel Institute. Before coming to Georgetown, he held positions at the Congressional Research Service, the US Department of Energy, and the US Department of State. He was educated at King College, the University of Oxford, where he was a Rhodes Scholar, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (PhD).

All lectures can be viewed on our youtube channel
www.youtube.com/KrasnoUNC

Lunch with Lawrence Grinter: “Chinese Military Doctrine” - Oct 22nd 2013

Join Dr. Lawrence Grinter for a luncheon discussion of Chinese nuclear doctrine, weapons, and policies. Lawrence Grinter (Ph.D. University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill) has just retired from his position as the Professor of Asian Studies, Department of International Studies, Air War College, Maxwell Air Force Base. He has co-edited and co-authored a number of books and scholarly articles on Asian security issues, to include the Vietnam war, Air Theory for the 21st century (Cyber, Biological Weapons, and Germ Warfare), and nuclear proliferation concerns in North Korea. His article on “Chinese military weapons, doctrine and policies, Pacific Focus (volume 28, Issue 1, pages 1-16) appeared in April 2013.

Follow this link to RSVP:
http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07e8a6380a37b9115a&llr=6qfh5neab

Lunch will be provided to those who register.

Hosted by UNC Curriculum in Peace, War and Defense; Sponsored by TISS. Contact Carolyn Pumphrey for additional information (pumphrey@duke.edu)

Dr. Melvyn Leffler: “Lessons of the Cold War” - Oct 22nd 2013

The United States faces difficult grand strategic challenges in the years ahead. As part of the Sanford School’s History and Public Policy Speaker Series, one of America’s leading historians explains what policymakers can learn from the Cold War era as they seek to deal with strategic problems and opportunities today.

Melvyn Leffler is Edward R. Stettinius professor in the Department of History at the University of Virginia. He served as Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at UVA from 1997 until 2001. In 1993 he won the Bancroft Prize for his book, A Preponderance of Power: National Security, the Truman Administration and the Cold War (1992), and in 2008, he won the George Louis Beer Prize for his book, For the Soul of Mankind: The United States, the Soviet Union, and the Cold War (2007).

Hosted by the Sanford School of Public Policy and the Duke Program in American Grand Strategy

For further information contact Mary Lindsley (mary.lindsley@duke.edu) or Alexandra Pfadt (alexandra.pfadt@duke.edu).

Contact Jenny Boyle (jenny.boyle@duke.edu) if you would like to arrange a one-on-one or small group meeting with Dr. Leffler.

Lien-Hang Nguyen (University of Kentucky): “Le Duan’s Struggles: Toward a New International History of the Vietnam War” - Oct 19th 2013

Vietnam Workers’ Party (VWP) First Secretary Le Duan led his country to full-scale war by outmaneuvering his opponents within the Party and military leadership in North Vietnam, subjugating the southern insurgency to Hanoi’s control, and silencing general dissent to his war policies. Divided into three parts, this paper will analyze Le Duan’s ascent to power and his efforts to promote revolutionary war, Party strategy, and Hanoi’s victory over the United States and its allies. Using never-before-seen materials from Vietnam, this paper parts the “bamboo curtain” that has long concealed strategy deliberation in Hanoi during its “Anti-American Resistance Struggle for Reunification and National Salvation.”

LIEN-HANG NGUYEN is Associate Professor of History at the University of Kentucky. Her book Hanoi’s War (UNC Press 2012) won the Stuart L. Bernath Prize from the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations and the Edward Coffman Prize from the Society for Military History.

Part of the Research Triangle Seminar Series: History of the Military, War, and Society
Co-convener: Triangle Institute for Security Studies

For more information see: www.unc.edu/mhss/

Global Nuclear Security Workshop: TISS Field Trip to Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Oct 12th 2013

Join TISS for a Global Nuclear Security Workshop at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

By Invitation Only (if interested contact pumphrey@duke.edu)

Registration here: https://events.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07e84sfdpaec93bbdd&oseq=&c=&ch=

Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a multiprogram science and technology laboratory managed for the U.S Department of Energy by UT-Battelle, LLC. Scientists and engineers at ORNL conduct basic and applied research and development to create scientific knowledge and technological solutions that strengthen the nation’s leadership in key areas of science; increase the availability of clean, abundant energy; restore and protect the environment; and contribute to national security.

ORNL also performs other work for the Department of Energy, including isotope production, information management, and technical program management, and provides research and technical assistance to other organizations. The laboratory is a program of DOE’s Oak Ridge Field Office

Sponsored by TISS

Professor Miguel La Serna (UNC-CH): Fire in the Andes – The Challenges of Researching Peru’s Armed Conflict - Oct 10th 2013

Join us at a TISS presenstation, cosponsored by the Institute for the Studies of the Americas. The talk will begin at 7 PM. Doors will open at 6:30 PM and you are cordially invited to join us for some Causa Rellena, Pork Wings with Aji Panca, Talapia Ceviche, Ensalada Rusa, Alfajores and Chicha Morada and other Peruvian specialties.

Miguel La Serna (Ph.D. University of California, San Diego) is Assistant Professor of History at UNC-Chapel Hill. He is interested in the relationship between culture, memory, and political violence in twentieth-century Latin America. His publications include, The Corner of the Living: Ayacucho on the Eve of the Shining Path Insurgency (UNC Press, 2012) and “To Cross the River of Blood: How an Inter-Community Conflict is Linked to the Peruvian Civil War, 1940–1983,” in Power, Culture, and Violence in the Andes, eds. Christine Hunefeldt and Milos Kokotovic (Sussex Academic Press, 2009). He is currently working on a study that explores the ways in which MRTA guerrillas and the Peruvian state used historical memory and nationalist symbolism to promote, achieve, and thwart revolutionary change in late-twentieth-century Peru. On the 9th October, Professor La Serna will talk about his work and the challenges of doing research on late –twentieth century political violence.

The event is free, but because space is limited and because we are providing food we do ask that you register in advance and send word if you have to cancel (pumphrey@duke.edu). Parking is available after 5 PM in the Fed Ex Global Education Parking Lot

Register here: http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07e895467g767a3985&llr=6qfh5neab

Prof. Martin J. Sherwin (George Mason University, Fairfax, VA): “Gambling with Armageddon: the Cuban Missile Crisis from Hiroshima to Havana” - Oct 09th 2013

The Richard M. Krasno Distinguished Professorship @ Chapel Hill presents Prof. Martin J. Sherwin on “Gambling with Armageddon: The Cuban Missile Crisis from Hiroshima to Havana”. This event is part of the “Cold War and Beyond” lecture series.

Martin J. Sherwin is University Professor of History at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia. Before moving to GMU in 2007 he was the Walter S. Dickson Professor of English and American History at Tufts University for 27 years. His recent book, American Prometheus: The Triumph and Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer (with Kai Bird) won the 2006 Pulitzer Prize for biography. Sherwin has been an advisor for many documentary films on the history of the nuclear age, and was the co-executive producer and NEH Project Director of the PBS documentary film, “Citizen Kurchatov: Stalin’s Bomb Maker” (1999).

All lectures can be viewed on our youtube channel
www.youtube.com/KrasnoUNC

European Union Ambassador to the U.S. to Speak about European Foreign Policy - Oct 03rd 2013

European Foreign Policy in the Making:
Join us for an important event at UNC with the EU ambassador to the US. The Center for European Studies/European Union Center of Excellence at UNC-Chapel Hill is pleased to announce this educational event, free and open to the public.

João Vale de Almeida, the European Union ambassador to the US, will visit UNC-Chapel Hill and deliver a talk called “European Foreign Policy in the Making.” Following his remarks, the ambassador will participate in a Q and A with the audience.

Ambassador Vale de Almeida is coming to North Carolina as part of the “Beyond the Beltway Initiative” of the Delegation of the EU to the US. Since taking the helm of the EU Delegation in 2010, Vale de Almeida has traveled across the US to engage with local and state government officials, public and private sector leaders, and think tanks and educational forums. His visit to UNC is supported by UNC’s Center for European Studies/European Union Center of Excellence and theAmbassadors Forum, organized by the Richard M. Krasno Distinguished Professorship in the Department of History.

Note: Seating is limited, but the lecture will be broadcast live to an overflow location, 1005 FedEx Global Education Center. Parking will not be available at the FedEx Global Education Center; however, for visitor parking lots, please see the Department of Public Safety.This project is funded by the European Union

Syria: The Wider Implications – A Panel Discussion - Oct 02nd 2013

Whether or not the international community agrees on a way to bring Syria’s chemical weapons under international control, the conflict in Syria will continue. How outside powers affect and are affected by that conflict is the subject of this panel presentation by UNC-CH political science faculty and doctoral students. Panelists will address the history of US involvement, the larger regional implications of the conflict, the track record of outside interventions and of outside mediation in civil wars, and how the U.S. military provides civilian leaders with advice about the use of military force.

– Introduction: Professor Timothy McKeown
– The Evolution of U.S Involvement: Bryce Loidolt, doctoral student
– Regional Implications of the Syrian Conflict: Professor Navin Bapat
– The Political Dynamics of Outside Intervention in Civil Wars: Professor Stephen Gent
– The Experience of Mediation in Civil Wars: Elizabeth Menninga, doctoral student
– Role of the U.S. Military in Advising Political Leaders on the Use of Force: Chris Watt, doctoral student

Sponsored by the Department of Political Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. For more information call: 919-843-3922 or email: ps_undergradcoordinator@unc.edu

AGS Lecture: The Honorable Daniel Poneman (Deputy Secretary of Energy - Sep 27th 2013

Daniel Poneman is the United States Deputy Secretary of Energy. Since 2001, Poneman was a Principal of The Scowcroft Group, a business advisory firm in Washington, D.C. Prior to that, Poneman was also a partner in the law firm of Hogan & Hartson, and briefly served as Acting Secretary of Energy in 2013 following the resignation of Steven Chu. Between 1993 and 1996, Poneman served as Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Nonproliferation and Export Controls at the National Security Council. He joined the NSC staff in 1990 as the Director of Defense Policy and Arms Control, after also serving as a White House Fellow in the United States Department of Energy.

The German General Elections of 2013: Results and Consequences - Sep 25th 2013

The Richard M. Krasno Distinguished Professorship in History and International Affairs at UNC-Chapel Hill (Professor Klaus W Larres) presents:

A panel discussion with experts on the 2013 Germnan general elections. Panelists include:
Konrad Jaraush (Dept. of History, UNC-CH)
Helga Welsh (Dept. of History, Wake Forest)
Holger Moroff (Dept. of Political Science, UNC-CH)

Moderated by: Klaus Larres (Dept. of History/PWAD, UNC-CH)

Organized in cooperation with the UNC Center for European Studies and the Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense.

Erica Kuhlman (Idaho State University): “Transnational Cultures of Mourning: War Widows and Fallen Soldiers in World War I” - Sep 21st 2013

How did nation-states lay claims on the bodies of soldiers and their wives during World War I? This lecture will analyze the experiences of war widows and their husbands to untangle the complex relationships between these two core wartime-figures and the nation-state. War widows could imagine the horrors of trench warfare as well as the sorrow of widows from other warring nations. As a result they participated not only in gendered mourning rituals endorsed by the state, but also created transnational cultures of mourning that challenged the nation-state’s right to the bodies of their husbands, to their own bodies, and the right to wage war in general.

ERIKA KUHLMAN is Professor of History and director of women studies at Idaho State University. Her research focuses on comparative and transnational histories of World War I. Her books include Reconstructing Patriarchy after the Great War: Women, Gender, and Postwar Reconciliation between Nations (2008) and Of Little Comfort: War Widows, Fallen Soldiers, and the Remaking of the Nation after the Great War (2012).

For more info: http://gwc.web.unc.edu/

TISS New Faces Conference - Sep 22nd 2013

Each year, since 2000, TISS has invited seven to ten outstanding doctoral candidates working in security studies to present their research at a “New Faces” conference.

Examples of Topics:
“When and Why States Project Military Power.”
“Law, Security, and Ethnic Profiling: Italians in the United States During World War II.”
“The Determinants of Volatility in Foreign Policy.”
“Undermining Resistance: Mobilization, Repression and the Enforcement of Political Order.”

Additional information & registration: http://tiss.sanford.duke.edu/NFXIII.php

TISS/Duke AGS Seminar: Dr. Ole Holsti - Sep 18th 2013

Dr. Ole Holsti is the George V. Allen Professor of Political Science. He specializes in international politics and foreign policy decision-making. He has written books about crisis escalation, international alliances, and public opinion and American foreign policy. He has been the recipient of six National Science Foundation Research Grants, and distinguished lifetime achievement awards from the American Political Science Association and the International Society for Political Psychology.

Event co-Hosted with Duke American Grand Startegy Program

Ambasador Frank Wisner (Washington DC): “The United States and the Crisis in the Middle East” - Sep 18th 2013

The Richard M. Krasno Distinguished Professorship @ Chapel Hill Presents the lecture series’ Ambassador Frank Wisner on “The United States and the Crisis in the Middle East”. This event is part of the “Ambassadors Forum” lecture series.

Frank George Wisner is a businessman and former diplomat. On January 31, 2011, he was sent to Egypt by President Barack Obama to negotiate a resolution to the popular protests against the regime that have swept the country.

All lectures can be viewed on our youtube channel
www.youtube.com/KrasnoUNC

TISS/ESI Tour of Nuclear Reactor - Sep 13th 2013

Prof. Richard H. Kohn (UNC Chapel Hill): “Six Myths about Civil-Millitary Relations in the United States” - Sep 13th 2013

The Richard M. Krasno Distinguished Professorship @ Chapel Hill Presents Professor Richard Kohn on “Six Myths about Civil-Military Relations in the United States”
This lecture is part of the lecture series “The U.S. In World Affairs: the Cold War and Beyond”

Richard Kohn is professor emeritus at UNC Chapel Hill. A specialist in American military history and civil-military relations, Dick Kohn was the Chief of Air Force History for the USAF, 1981-1991. From 1992-2006 he chaired Carolina’s Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense (PWAD) and from 1992-2000, headed the Triangle Institute for Security Studies (TISS). Richard Kohn’s writing and teaching has focused on American war making, national security policy, and the connections between war, the military, and American society. In recent years his concentration has been on civilian control of the military. Dick Kohn has published widely on these topics and since the 1970s has made numerous contributions to the nation’s debates about military engagements abroad and civil-military relations. In view of current developments in world politics in the Middle East and elsewhere, Dick Kohn’s talk is particularly relevant to global affairs.

All lectures can be viewed on our youtube channel
www.youtube.com/KrasnoUNC

GEN David H. Petraeus (US Army – Ret.) — “America and the World” - Sep 12th 2013

As part of the The Ambassador Dave and Kay Phillips Family International Lectureship, the Duke Program in American Grand Strategy is pleased to announce General David H. Petraeus (US Army – Retired) will be the Ambassador Dave and Kay Phillips Family International lectureship speaker on Wednesday, September 11.

This event is co-sponsored by the Triangle Institute for Security Studies, the Duke Office of Global Strategy and Programs, the Sanford School of Public Policy, and Duke University Political Science.

*Tickets are required for admission. Tickets for Duke students, faculty, and staff will be available for in-person pick-up only at the Box Office window or online at tickets.duke.edu. For additional information, please contact Alexandra.pfadt@duke.edu.

CIA Informational Session - Sep 12th 2013

2-3 representatives from the CIA will be giving an informational session and collecting CVs from PWAD majors. For those interested in interning or finding a job there, this will be a valuable experience.

Syria Panel Discussion - Sep 04th 2013

Robotic and Remotely Piloted Aircraft Inside the United States: Applicaitons, Safety, Perceptions and Privacy Concerns - May 09th 2013

The domestic use of robotic or remotely piloted aircraft is expected to become an $85 billion business within a few years, as this technology becomes widely available for commercial application within the US. This technology offers many public safety benefits and commercial opportunities, but it also raises concerns about personal privacy, safety, and liability. At this policy forum, a group of leading experts will discuss and explore concerns ranging from public opinion toward the use of unmanned aircraft flying above our communities to the policies needed to ensure these aircraft are operated safely and do not violate the privacy we enjoy as American citizens.

LTG David Barno & Mr. Frank Ruggiero, “Afghanistan and Beyond” - Apr 19th 2013

Conference Agenda:
3:00—5:00 pm : Fellows’ Research GEC 4003
 COL Bob Agans: “Swords and Plowshares—Modification of the Multiple Launch Rocket System of Munitions (MFOM) to Augment U.S. Government Requirements”
 COL Michael Bineham: “Special Operations Commemoration: A Study of Monu-ments, Memory, and Memorialization Practices of Elite Organizations”
 COL Bo Clayton: “Implementing Research in Mass Communication, Advertising, and Marketing at the Strategic and Operational Levels of War”
 COL Thomas Drew: “Egypt and the Arab Spring: What are the Implications for U.S. Foreign Policy”
 LTC/P M. Dean Franks: “Institutionalizing Interdependence: U.S. Army Special Operations Forces / Conventional Forces, ‘No Turning Back’”
 COL Alan Shumate: “Employing U.S. Army Special Forces to Defeat America’s Emerging Threats”
7:00—9:00 pm: Panel Discussion GEC Nelson Mandela Auditorium
 LTG (USA, R) David Barno, Senior Adviser and Senior Fellow at the Center for a New American Security
 Frank Ruggiero, Acting Vice President for Federal Relations at BAE Systems (former Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary (PDAS) in the Bureau of Political-Military Affairs (PM) and former acting Special Representative to Afghanistan & Pa-kistan for the U.S. State Department)
 [Invited] BG Michael Kurilla, Assistant Commander for Support, Joint Special Operations Command
 Moderated by Dr. Wayne Lee, Chair of the UNC Curriculum in Peace, War, and De-fense
For additional information the conference please contact Jennifer Boyle (Jennifer.boyle@duke.edu) or (919) 613-9301 or visit the TISS website: www.tiss-nc.org.
The UNC-TISS National Security Fellowship Pro-gram (NSFP)
The NSFP was established in 2010 to provide U.S. Army Sol-diers from the U.S. Army Special Operations Command (USASOC) and the Joint Special Operations Command (JSOC) a senior-service school equivalent civilian Fellowship through the U.S. Army War College. Additional infor-mation on the Program can be found here: http://nsfp.web.unc.edu. This confer-ence is a capstone to the Fellow-ship Program and to their time here at the University of North Carolina.
The U.S. Army War College (AWC)
The purpose of the AWC at this time in our Nation’s history is to produce graduates from all our courses who are skilled critical thinkers and complex problem solvers in the global application of Land power. Concurrently, it is our duty to the Army to also act as a “Think Factory” for Commanders and Civilian Leaders at the
strategic level worldwide and
routinely engage in discourse and debate on ground forces’ role in achieving the national security objectives.
Afghanistan and Beyond April 18, 2013 | UNC FedEx Global Education Center (GEC), UNC-Chapel Hill Campus
Featuring
LTG David Barno (USA, Ret), Center for a New American Security
&
Mr. Frank Ruggiero (Former Special Rep. to Afghanistan & Pakistan, U.S. State department), BAE Systems

Annegret Fauser (UNC Chapel Hill): “Gender, War and Culture: Music in the US During World War II” - Apr 13th 2013

East Asian Film Series Workshop: “Transnational North Korea and Northeast Asia: Migration and Urbanization: - Apr 06th 2013

Duke/UNC Film Series and Workshop

East Asian Film Series, “Dooman River” Q & A with director Zhang Lu follows screening - Apr 05th 2013

Duke/UNC Film Series and Workshop, Transnational North Korea: Migration and Urbanization

East Asian Film Series, “Desert Dream” Q & A with director Zhang Lu follows screening - Apr 04th 2013

Duke/UNC Film Series and Workshop, Transnational North Korea: Migration and Urbanization

Kristen Neuschel (Duke University) - Mar 23rd 2013

“Material Culture and Warrior Identity in Europe, 1400-1600”

James O. Stutler (Duke University, Department of History): Reputation, Military Entrepreneurship and Noble Identity in the Catholic League, 1619-1635″ - Mar 23rd 2013

Jeremy Black, Military Historian, Speaking on WWII - Mar 22nd 2013

Acclaimed military historian Jeremy Black (University of Exeter), will be speaking at UNC on “Why the Allies Won World War II.” (and the answer is not as simple as most people think!) This talk is sponsored by UNC’s Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense.

East Asian Film Series, “Our School” - Mar 21st 2013

Duke/UNC Film Series and Workshop, Transnational North Korea: Migration and Urbanization

James Goldston: “The Architecture of Human Rights” - Mar 19th 2013

James Goldston oversses the Open Society Justice Initiative, which promotes rights-based law reform and the development of legal capacity worldwide. A leading practitioner of international human rights and criminal law, he has litigated several groundbreaking cases before the European Court of Human Rights and United Nations treaty bodies, and served as coordinator of prosecutions and senior trial attorney in the Office of the prosecutor at the International Criminal Court.

Neve Gordon: “Is it Possible to Create a Common Future? Hagar: Jewish=Arab Education for Equality”; Franklin Humanities Institute (FHI); FHI Garage – C105, Bay 4, Smith Warehouse; RSVP required to Serena.Elliott@duke.edu; lunch to be served: Saladelia - Mar 07th 2013

SEMINAR
After discussing the deep-rooted segregation in the Israeli school system, Neve Gordon will present the history of how (and why) the Hagar Jewish-Palestinian school was established, the various challenges Hagar’s educational project faces–especially in the midst of escalating tensions in the region–and the possibilities its progressive multicultural education opens for the future.

East Asian Film Series, “Goodbye, Pyongyang” - Mar 07th 2013

Duke/UNC Film Series and Workshop, Transnational North Korea: Migration and Urbanization

LECTURE: Neve Gordon: “Securitizing Human Rights: Lawfare and the Assault on Rights Work in Israel/Palestine” - Mar 06th 2013

A major campaign against universal human rights has been underway for the past decade. This campaign is intricately tied to the global war on terrorism and is part of a backlash against the mounting success of human rights organizations and cause lawyers in subjecting conflict and warfare to legal analysis and oversight. In this talk, Neve Gordon uses Israel as a case study to show how the term lawfare (a combination of law and warfare) is being mobilized by neoconservatives to securitize “rights work” so as to reconstitute the human rights field as a national security threat; the objective, he claims, is to restrict the utilization of universal jurisdiction worldwide.

Film Screening and Q&A with filmmaker Zhang Lu - Mar 05th 2013

Set in China, Zhang’s fifth feature film, DOORMAN RIVER, concerns the friendship and tensions between two boys, an ethnic Korean and a North Korean defector.

Major General Kenneth McKenzie, Jr., USMC, “Marine Corps Strategy in a Tough Fiscal Environment” - Mar 02nd 2013

2009-2010 Deputy to the Deputy Chief of Staff (DC)S for Stability in ISAF, Kabul, Afghanistan. 2010-2012 Director, Strategy, Plans, and Policy (J-5) for the U.S. Central Command in Tampa, Florida. 2012 to present, Headquarters Marine Corps, Director of the Quadrennial Defense Review Integration Group.

East Asian Film Series, “Souls of Zen: Buddhism, Ancestors, and the 2011 Tsunami in Japan” Q & A with filmmaker Tim Graf follows - Feb 28th 2013

Peter Lorge on Sun Tzu, Hamilton 569 5:30 - Feb 26th 2013

“Understanding and Misunderstanding
Sunzzi’s (Sun tzu) Art of War”

Peter Lorge teaches Chinese and Military history at Vanderbilt University. He specializes in 10th and 11th century Chinese military history and thought, and is the author, most recently, of Chinese Martial Arts: From Antiquity to the Twenty-First Century (Cambridge), and editor of The Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms (Chinese University Press). He has two forthcoming edited volumes: Debating War in Chinese History (Brill) and, with Kaushik Roy as editor, Chinese and Indian Warfare: From Classical Times Until 1870. His earlier books include War, Politics and Society in Early Modern China, 900-1795 (Routledge, 2005) and, The Asian Military Revolution: From Gunpowder to the Bomb (Cambridge, 2008). He is currently working on a history of Chinese military thought and a translation of Sunzi’s Art of War that will include the complete eleven commentaries. In 2004 he won the Harriet S. Gilliam Award for Excellence in Teaching. He has also appeared on CNN to discuss contemporary Chinese military issues.

Kristen Neuschel (Duke University, Department of History): “Material Culture and Warrior Identity in Europe, 1400-1600” - Feb 23rd 2013

Ambassador Andras Simonyi (former Ambassador of Hungary to the US): “Hungary, Transatlantic Relations, and the EU” - Feb 22nd 2013

The Richard M. Krasno Distinguished Professorship in cooperation with the Center for European Studies, The Triangle Institute for Security Studies (TISS), the Peace, War & Defense Curriculum (PWAD), the Center for Slavic, Eurasian and East European Studies & Dept. of History present an Ambassadors Forum talk and panel discussion.

Kurt Campbell, Assistant Secretary of State, “The Asia Pivot: America’s Destiny & the Furture of American Power in the Asia-Pacific” - Feb 21st 2013

The Von der Heyden Fellows Program Endowed Lecture Series and the Duke Program in American Grand Strategy will host Assistant Secretary of State, Kurt Campbell.

East Asian Film Series, “The Journals of Musan” - Feb 21st 2013

Duke/UNC Film Series and Workshop, Transnational North Korea: Migration and Urbanization

East Asian Film Series, “Embracing” - Feb 20th 2013

Discussion on the work of Kawase Naomi follows, led by Leo Ching and Takushi Odagiri

East Asian Film Series, “The Mourning Forest” - Feb 13th 2013

East Asian Film Series, “Writing in Water” Q & A with director Angela Zito follows - Feb 08th 2013

Prof. Frank Costigliola, Univ. of Connecticut, “The Processes of Thought in George Kennan’s Imagining of Russia” - Feb 08th 2013

The U.S. In World Affairs: The Cold War & Beyond: A lecture series orgainized by the Richard M. Krasno Distinguished Professorship in co-operation with the Department of History and the Center for European Studies.

Ambassador Phillip T. Reeker, Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for European and Eurasian Affairs - Jan 30th 2013

Ambassador Phillip Reeker will talk at UNC Chapel Hill on “The Balkans: From War and ‘Ethnic cleansing’ to Democratization and Integration into Europe.”

Luncheon Reading Seminar: Gender, Sexual Violence and War with Dubravka Zarkov (Erasmus University Rotterdam, The International Institute of Social Studies) - Jan 25th 2013

Moderation: Karen Hagemann (UNC Department of History)
Introduction: Dubravka Zarkov
Comments: Sarah E. Wagner (The George Washington University, Dept. of Anthropology)
Michele Levy (North Carolina A&T State University, Department of English)

A registration for the Luncheon Reading Seminar is necessary until January 15, 2013. Please register with Friederike Bruehoefener: fbruehoe@email.unc.edu

Public Lecture: “Masculinity, Sexual violence, and Ethnicity in the 1990s Balkan Wars and Beyond” - Jan 26th 2013

Dubravka Zarkov (Erasmus University Rotterdam, The International Institute of Social Studies)
The wars in former Yugoslavia were notorious for the rape of women as one of the major war strategies. it is less knows fact that, within the war camps, detained men faced systematic sexual assaults too. Why were the assaults on men invisible? Why the academics and media that wrote extensively about rapes of women did not pay attention to sexual assaults on men? Is this a special, isolated case, or are there other wars and violent conflicts where sexual assaults on men are invisible? And if the violated bodies of men were exposed in other conflicts, what accounts for this exposure? In the trying to answer those questions, the lecture explores the nexus of masculinity, heteronormativity and power, in intersections with ethnicity, race, and religion.

The Duke-UNC “Gender, War and Culture” Series - Jan 25th 2013

5:20 pm: Movie Screening: “In the Land of Blood and Honey” (USA, 2011), Director: Angelina Jolie
Set against the backdrop of the Bosnian War that tore the Balkan region apart in the 1990s, “In the Land of Blood and Honey” tells the story of Danijel and Ajla, a man and a woman from different sides of a brutal ethnic conflict. Danijel, a soldier fighting for the Serbs, and Ajla, a Bosnian held captive int he camp he oversees, knew each other before the way, and could have found love with each other. But as the armed conflict takes hold of their lives, their relationship grows darker, their motives and connection to one another ambiguous, their allegiances uncertain.
7:20 pm: Podium discussion on the movie: Gender, War and Violence in the 1990s Balkan Wars
Moderation: Karen Hagemann (UNC-Chapel Hill Department of History)
Roundtable:
Robert M. Jenkins (UNC, Center for Slavic, Eurasian and East European Studies)
Dubravka Zarkov (Erasmus University Rotterdam, The International Inst.of Social Studies)
Adnan Dzuhmur (UNC Center for Slavic, Eurasian and East European Studies)
Joanne Hershfield (UNC Department of Women’s and Gender Studies)

East Asian Film Series: “The Flower Girl” - Jan 24th 2013

Duke/UNC Film Series and Workshop: Transnational North Korea: Migration and Urbanization.

Lecture by William Leuchtenburg - Jan 22nd 2013

Prof. William Leuchtenburg, professor emeritus at UNC Chapel Hill, on “U.S. Presidents and Foreign Policy: From Harry Truman to Barack Obama.”

Kristen Dolan (UNC-Chapel Hill, Department of History): “Hardly Any Nazi Will Become a Democrat in an Internment Camp: Denazification in American Occupied Germany, 1944-1950” - Jan 21st 2013

Hal Brands (Duke University, Sanford School of Public Policy): “Conspiring Bastards: Saddam Hussein’s Strategic View of the United States” - Dec 08th 2012

Michael Hunt, talk - Dec 05th 2012

“U.S. Nationalism and the World: Thinking about a Country in Disarray”

Mia Bloom, Assoc. Prof. of International Studies at Penn State Univ., “Weaponizing the Weak: Creating a Model Of Child Grooming in to Violent Extremist Organizations” - Dec 01st 2012

Dr. Bloom will examine the growing involvement of children in terrorist organizations. Many children are forced into terrorist movements while others are exploited and groomed to become violent extremists. At the same time, the children become victimized and traumatized by their experiences. Dr. Bloom will present a new psychosocial model of children and terrorism, tracing the changing role of children from victims to perpetrators while also demonstrating the disturbing interchangeability of these roles. This new study expands our understanding of the role of structural conditions and targeted policies aimed at constructing cultures of martyrdom.
Dr. Bloom is a leading expert on suicide terrorism and is the author of “Dying to Kill: The allure of Suicide Terror” and “Bombshell: The Many Faces of Women Terrorists”

An Evening with Deputy Secretary of Defense Ashton B. Carter - Nov 29th 2012

The Von der Heyden Fellows Program Endowed Lecture Series, in partnership with the Duke Program in American Grand Strategy and the Triangle Institute for Security Studies will host the Honorable Deputy Securetary of Defsne, Ash Carter. This event is co-sponsored by the Duke Office of Global Strategy and Programs, the Sanford School of Public Policy, and the Duke International Reltions Association. It is free and open to the public.

PWAD Thanksgiving Dinner: Presented by the PWAD Alumni Association, open to all - Nov 21st 2012

Join the PWADAA and fellow PWAD students for a Thanksgiving feast. PWADAA will provide the main course and attending guests should bring a side dish or dessert to share! R.S.V.P. https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AnjQFiKY_2gndHBENURTMUN1RW9DaFUyNzRvVTllRmc

Klaus Larres (Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Department of History/Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense): “Peacemakers: Attlee – Churchill – Macmillan: British Attempts to Settle the East-West Conflict (1945-1963)” - Nov 17th 2012

Career Night-Duke University - Nov 16th 2012

The duke Program in American Grand Strategy’s undergraduate council will host its annual Career Night. This year, Duke alumni from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, the Institute for Defense Analysis, the Council on Foreign Relations, and a congressional campaign’s Communications Director will speak with students and answer questions related to their work.

The Triangle Center on Terrorism and Homeland Security & the DeWitt Wallace Center for Media and Democracy welcome Jack Goldsmith, J.D. author of “Power and constraint: The Accountable Presidency After 9-11” - Nov 15th 2012

Jack Goldsmith is the Henry L. Shattuck Professor at harvard Law School, where he teaches and writes about national security law, presidential power, cybersecurity, international law, internet law, foreign relations law, and conflict of laws. Before comeing to Harvard, Professor Goldsmith served as Assistant Attorney General, Office of Legal Counsel from 2003-2004, and Special Counsel to the Department of Defense from 2002-2003.

TCTHS/AGS/TISS co-sponsored event: pollster John Zogby, “Did Minorities Matter: Their Impact on the 2012 Election” is sponsored by the Duke Islamic Studies Center - Nov 15th 2012

Roundtable discussion with the Ambassador of the Republic of Georgia - Nov 13th 2012

The Ambassador will talk about “Georgia’s Role in World Affairs” and the country’s relations with Russia, Europe, and the U.S.

half the sky: Turing Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide: Part 1 Nov 11th: Gender based violence, sex trafficking, and education. Part 2 Nov 12th: Maternal mortality, forced prostitution, and economic empowerment. - Nov 13th 2012

This two-part documentary series for PBS and international broadcast introduces women and girls worldwide who are living under some of the most difficult circumstances imaginable – fighting bravely to change them. Inspired by their best-selling book, authors Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn travel with celebrity actresses across the glove to tell the stories of inspiring, courageous individuals creating change for women and girls everywhere.

Conference: Retrenchment or Renewal: Grand Strategy in Times of Fiscal Constraint - Nov 11th 2012

Conference: Retrenchment of Renewal: Grand Strategy in Times of Fiscal Constraint - Nov 11th 2012

The Political Science of Retrenchment/Renewal: What is the state of the literature explaining conditions under which retrenchment/renewal happens and the conditions under which it leads to better or worse outcomes?

Presidential Transitions, Identifying National and International Issues, Deciding Cabinet Appointments, and Much More… - Nov 08th 2012

Prof. Terry Sullivan will talk about this time of transition and what it means for President Obama or President Romney as they prepare to assme the responsibilities of the Oval Office on January 20, 2013. Prof. Sullivan teaches courses on the Congress, the Presidency, and leadership. He also serves on the White House Transition Team, combining the efforts of scholars, universities, and policy institutions to smooth out the American presidential transition.

The Invisible War: A film by Kirby Dick and Amy Ziering - Nov 08th 2012

“A groundbreaking investigative documentary about one of America’s most shameful and best kept secrets: the epidemic of rape within the U.S. military…a female soldier in combat zones is more likely to be raped by a fellow soldier than killed by enemy fire.”

Michael Schoebaum, PhD, Senior Advisor for Mental Health Services, Epidemiology, and Economics, National Institute of Mental Health - Nov 03rd 2012

“Assessing Risk and Protective Factors For Suicide In US Army Soldiers: The Army Starrs Study”

Ray Mabus, Secretary of the Navy: “Leadership in Service” - Nov 02nd 2012

Speaker: Prof. Justin Gross, “The Latino/a Vote: Potential Power at the Sweet Spot Between Cohesion and Diversity” - Oct 31st 2012

Analysts have touted the potentially pivotal role Latino/a voters will play in the 2012 presidential election. What does it mean to say that members of a diverse demographic group are “swing voters”? Might the recent trend toward overwhelming support for one party actually reduce Hispanic political influence: How much does low turnout reduce the potential to affect results? A look at recent polling of Latino/a voters, the current state of the electoral map, and the puzzle of group voting power.

Sonya O. Rose (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor): “Gender and the Politics of Sacrifice: Britain and the Colonial Empire in the Age of World War I” - Oct 27th 2012

Prof. Mark Kramer (Harvard University) “Cold War Myths and Realities: Understanding Today’s Threats and Challenges in Historical Perspective” 569 Hamilton Hall, 4-5:30pm - Oct 24th 2012

“What’s at Stake for America’s Global Role in the 2012 Election?” – A Debate Between Karl Rove & Robert Gibbs - Oct 23rd 2012

The Ambassador Dave and Kay Phillips Family International Lecture and AGS, with support from the Triangle Institute for Security Studies, the Duke Office of Global Strategy and Programs, the Sanford School of Public Policy, the Duke College Republicans, the College Democrats, the Duke International Relations Association, and the Hamilton Society, welcome Karl Rove and Robert Gibbs for a foreign policy debate on October 22, 2012 at Page Auditorium.

The Debate will be moderated by AGS Director Peter Feaver.

TICKETS WILL BE REQUIRED FOR THIS EVENT and will be available at the Duke Box Office or online at www.tickets.duke.edu on October 10.

OR–you can get your tickets in advance! Be one of the first 50 people to arrive at our student foreign policy debate on October 9, and you will secure a ticket to what will undoubtedly be a sold out event on October 22.

Location: Page Auditorium, Duke University

Time: 5:00 – 6:30 pm

Parking: The Bryan Center Parking Garage ($5 per vehicle)

*Non-media questions should be directed to Jennifer Boyle (jennifer.boyle@duke.edu). Media inquiries should be directed to Karen Kemp (karen.kemp@duke.edu).

AGS Students Square Off in Foreign Policy Debate–Moderated by [Secret] Obama and Romney Campaign Surrogates - Oct 10th 2012

The Duke Program in American Grand Strategy will host its traditional pre-election student debate on foreign policy on October 9, 2012. Debate participants are members of AGS Director Peter Feaver’s “Campaigns” class, and the debate will be moderated by campaign surrogates whose identities will be revealed at the event.

*The first 50 attendees will receive a general admission ticket to the Rove vs. Gibbs debate that AGS will host on October 22 before they are made available on October 10.

This event will also stream live on the Duke U-Stream Channel.

Prof. Lloyd Gardner (Rutgers University) “A View of the Imperial Presidency: Developments from Korea to the War of the Drones” 569 Hamilton Hall, 4-5:30pm - Oct 09th 2012

TISS–ISAC/ISSS Conference. Eric Schmitt/Thom Shanker (Security Studies in Times of Transition) - Oct 06th 2012

TISS–ISAC/ISSS Conference. Speaker MG H.R. McMaster (Security Studies in Times of Transition) - Oct 05th 2012

Fred Wehling, Assoc. Prof. for Nonproliferation and Terrorism Studies, Monterey Institute of Interntional Studies, “Terrorism with CBRN Weapons” - Oct 05th 2012

Michele Flournoy (American Grand Strategy in a Time of Fiscal Constraint: A Conversation with Peter Feaver) - Sep 28th 2012

Col. Kevin McDonnell (ret.) Dir. of the US Special Operations Command Care Coalition: Needs of wounded and disabled veterans - Sep 21st 2012

Peter Beinart (The Crisis of Zionism) - Sep 21st 2012

12th Annual TISS New Faces Conference - Sep 16th 2012

12th Annual TISS New Faces Conference - Sep 15th 2012

Ariana E. Vigil (UNC Chapel Hill): “War Narratives: Gender, War, and Activism in Contemporary U.S. Latina/o Cultural Production” - Sep 15th 2012

Prof. Richard Immerman (Temple University) “Covert Operations, Intelligence Analysis, and the Making of the CIA: A Dynamic for Failure” 569 Hamilton Hall, 4-5:30pm - Sep 12th 2012

Michael Collins, Ambassador of Ireland to the U.S. (“Ireland and the Euro Crisis)” - Sep 08th 2012

The Future on Al Qaida and its Adherents - Apr 20th 2012

*_”The Future War on Al-Qaida and its Adherents” _*

April 20, 2012 | 3:00 — 5:45* pm | UNC-Chapel Hill | Gerrard Hall
*Weather Permitting: Dinner will be provided for all attendees outside following the program

The United States has been pursuing Al-Qaida around the world for well over a decade.As the U.S. role in the war in Afghanistan seems set to wind down in the next few years, how will the broader conflict with Al-Qaida continue?Will it?In what shape?What is the likely terrorist threat over the next ten years and how will the nation’s military seek to meet it?This presentation and roundtable discussion is presented as part of UNC’s National Security Fellows Program. To help us in our planning we encourage you to register. If you click HERE you will out further information about the program and the speakers and also an online registration form.

*Welcome and Introduction: TBD*

*3:00 — 4:00 pm Keynote Presentation: **General David M. Rodriguez *

Commanding General: U.S. Army Forces Command

* 4:00 — 4:15 pm Break *

*4:15 — 5:45 pm Roundtable Discussion *

Discussants (bios available online):

*BG(P) Michael Nagata*, /Deputy Director for Special Operations and Counterterrorism

*AMB (Ret.) David Litt, */Executive Director for the Center for Stabilization and Economic Reconstruction

*Greg Jaffe, */Military Correspondent (/The Washington Post/)/

Moderated by: *MG (USAF, Ret.) Charles Dunlap, Jr., */Director of the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security (Duke Law School)/

*5:45 — 7:00 pm Dinner on the Verandah *

After Afghanistan - Apr 15th 2012

After Afghanistan: Where to from here? - Apr 14th 2012

Syria Undercover - Apr 12th 2012

All – Come see a gripping film on the ongoing uprising in Syria, filmed secretly by an undercover correspondent who narrowly avoids capture. It’s a PBS Frontline special expose called “Syria Undercover,” and it will feature at the next Scholar in Residence (SIR) session at 6:00 PM, Thursday, April 12 in the Craige Coffee House.

Meet fellow students with an interest in global issues and sit down with a bagel or piece of pizza as we view amazing footage of the daring underground movement to overthrow the brutal Assad dictatorship. The film also offers important insights into the nature of this struggle, as part of the broader Arab Spring phenomenon.

SIR Bill Lucas, a ’73 UNC graduate with 32 years in the Foreign Service and assignments in Afghanistan, Philippines, South Africa, Belgium, and the Czech Republic, will also answer questions about careers in international affairs, the State Department, and the Foreign Service.

Tales of the Foreign Service: Life and Work in the State Department - Apr 11th 2012

Tales of the Foreign Service: Life and Work in the State Department

Carmichael and Cobb Community Government presents an educational program with one of only 16 diplomats in residence, Bill Lucas!!!

On Wednesday, April 11th from 6pm to 7pm, Mr. Lucas will be at Carmichael Fishbowl to share his experience in the State Department. A short video clip of a National Geographic documentary on the State Department will be shown, followed by information on internships and careers in the US Department of State and in Foreign Service. Food (from alpine bagels) will be served while it lasts!

Bill lucas is an UNC alumnus who led US civilian-military team in Kabul, Afghanistan to strengthen Afghan justice system, 2010-11; promoted human rights in UN General Assembly, New York (2004-05); outreach to, first-hand reporting on anti-apartheid leadership during transition to democracy in South Africa (1989-91); witnessed Moscow stand-off between Russian military and renegade legislators holed up at White House (Parliament).

Carmichael and Cobb Community Government presents an educational program with one of only 16 diplomats in residence, Bill Lucas!!!

On Wednesday, April 11th from 6pm to 7pm, Mr. Lucas will be at Carmichael Fishbowl to share his experience in the State Department. A short video clip of a National Geographic documentary on the State Department will be shown, followed by information on internships and careers in the US Department of State and in Foreign Service. Food (from alpine bagels) will be served while it lasts!

Bill lucas is an UNC alumnus who led US civilian-military team in Kabul, Afghanistan to strengthen Afghan justice system, 2010-11; promoted human rights in UN General Assembly, New York (2004-05); outreach to, first-hand reporting on anti-apartheid leadership during transition to democracy in South Africa (1989-91); witnessed Moscow stand-off between Russian military and renegade legislators holed up at White House (Parliament).

My Mind is Not a Target: Youth Resisting War in Columbia - Apr 11th 2012

My Mind Is Not A Target:
Youth Resisting War in Colombia

Colombian youth Sebastián Patiño speaks on refusing to participate in war as a member of Conscientious Objectors’ Collective Action.

Wednesday, April 11, 5:30pm
Global Education Center, room 4003
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

War and militarism impact youths’ lives, especially when they are convinced, obligated, or forced, to be soldiers fighting at the front lines of war.
Amidst obligatory military service and a four-decade armed conflict, Colombian youth are courageously refusing to be part of the war and to stop the values of war from dominating the cultures in their communities. Sebastián Patiño is an active member of Conscientious Objectors’ Collective Action (ACOOC), a Bogotá-based group of young people organizing to promote non-violence and freedom of conscience, and to resist the cycle of violence in Colombia.

Sebastián comes to UNC to explore the common challenges that youth in the United States and Colombia face. Join us to find ways to support each other in resisting militarism and empowering youth through solidarity and creative action.

Sponsored by:
The Consortium in Latin American and Carribean Studies at UNC-CH and Duke University, Department of Geography, Duke-UNC Rotary Center, UNC Center For Global Initiatives, Latin American Political Imaginaries and Social Movements Working Groups

An Evening with Dr. Condoleezza Rice - Apr 10th 2012

Dear PWAD Community, The Duke Program on American Grand Strategy and the Ambassador Dave and Kay Phillips Family International Lecture are proud to announce “An Evening with Dr. Condoleezza Rice.” This event will be held in Page Auditorium on April 10, 2012 at 4:30 pm. It is co-sponsored by the Triangle Institute for Security Studies, the Sanford School of Public Policy, the Duke Office of Global Strategy and Programs, and the Alexander Hamilton Society. As you will note above, the Triangle Institute for Security Studies is co-sponsoring Dr. Rice’s upcoming visit. As part of this co-sponsorship, 30 tickets have been set aside for UNC students. Please, limit one per person. Tickets reserved through TISS will be held at the will call window. Please contact Jennifer Boyle with “PWAD – Secretary Rice” in the subject line. Tickets will be required for the live lecture, as well as for the video-feed overflow. TICKETS WILL BE AVAILABLE STARTING ON APRIL 4, 2012. This event will not be streamed live online, nor will it be available for viewing after the event. Additional ticketing information: This event is free and open to the public. Tickets will be made available to the Duke Community at 11:00 am on April 4 and to the general public at 1:00 pm on the same afternoon. Tickets may be collected at the Duke Box Office for free or online at www.tickets.duke.edu for a $5 fee. Parking for guests visiting campus will be available for $5 at the Bryan Center Parking Garage off of Science Drive. For additional information, please visit www.tiss-nc.org. Cheers,Jennifer Boyle

Afraid of Sharia? - Apr 06th 2012

The UNC Muslim Students Association invites you to a lecture about understanding the basics of Islamic Sharia law. Texas A&M University Accounting Professor, Anwer Ahmed will be the speaker.

The Burmese Spring. - Apr 05th 2012

> April 5: Andy Reynolds, assistant professor of political science and
> chair of global studies, will discuss The Burmese Spring. 12:30 p.m.,
> FedEx Global Education Center Room 1009. http://global.unc.edu/
>

U.S. Army War College Professor and author Larry Goodson - Apr 04th 2012

> April 3: U.S. Army War College Professor and author Larry Goodson
> will discuss the U.S. exit strategy from Afghanistan and Iraq. Part of
> the Great Decisions Speaker Series. 7 p.m. Carroll Hall 111.
> http://go.unc.edu/t7KCn

srael and Iran: Countdown to War?” – a conversation with Steven David - Apr 03rd 2012

Duke’s chapter of the Alexander Hamilton Society (AHS) presents “Israel and Iran: Countdown to War?” – a conversation with Steven David (Johns Hopkins University), moderated by Seth Cantey (Duke) on Tuesday, April 3rd, 2012 from 6:00pm-7:15pm in the Old Trinity Room in the West Union Building. There will be refreshments!!!

North Korea under 3 Kims - Apr 03rd 2012

Talk by Charles K. Armstrong
􀀃
FedEx􀀃Global􀀃􀀃
Education􀀃Center,􀀃
Room􀀃4003􀀃
5:30􀀃pm􀀃􀀃
Tuesday,􀀃April􀀃3rd􀀃
Kim􀀃Jong􀀃Un􀀃has􀀃recently􀀃taken􀀃leadership􀀃of􀀃North􀀃Korea􀀃following􀀃
the􀀃death􀀃of􀀃his􀀃father,􀀃Kim􀀃Jong􀀃Il.􀀃􀀃
How􀀃did􀀃North􀀃Korea􀀃become􀀃the􀀃world’’s􀀃only􀀃communist􀀃dynasty,􀀃
now􀀃under􀀃the􀀃third􀀃generation􀀃of􀀃Kim􀀃family􀀃rule?􀀃􀀃
What􀀃is􀀃the􀀃likelihood􀀃that􀀃North􀀃Korea’’s􀀃new􀀃leader􀀃will􀀃maintain􀀃
his􀀃hold􀀃on􀀃power?􀀃􀀃
North􀀃Korea􀀃has􀀃created􀀃a􀀃unique􀀃and􀀃surprisingly􀀃resilient􀀃political􀀃
system,􀀃one􀀃whose􀀃ability􀀃to􀀃survive􀀃should􀀃not􀀃be􀀃underestimated,􀀃
despite􀀃the􀀃tremendous􀀃pressures􀀃facing􀀃the􀀃country.􀀃

The Panama Deception at UNC - Apr 03rd 2012

On Monday April 2nd at 7:00 pm, filmmaker and activist Barbara Trent will present the Academy Award winning documentary The Panama Deception at UNC Chapel Hill in the Hanes Art Center, Room 121. Produced by Ms. Trent and David Kasper, The Panama Deception reveals the untold story of the 1989 US invasion of Panama, and the subsequent cover up by the US government and the mainstream media. Ms. Trent will discuss the film as a reflection of current events and as a case study of government deception and media disinformation. Doors open at 6:30 pm with Trent, Kasper and their Oscar on hand to greet the audience. Admission is free to the public.

The Rise of Brazil and India (Stanley Foundation) - Mar 29th 2012

“Development and National Security: USAID’s Critical Role - Mar 28th 2012

Please join us as the Duke Center for International Development presents the third Rethinking Development Policy Lecture of the Spring Semester. “Development and National Security: USAID’s Critical Role”Kenneth A. Lanza (MIDP alum ’94), USAID Senior Director for Management

When: Wednesday, March 28, 2012Where: Sanford 223 (Rhodes), Sanford School of Public Policy
Time: 5:30pm-7:00pm Light refreshments will be served.

Britain in the World: Still Looking for a Role? - Mar 27th 2012

SIR CHRISTOPHER MEYER, KCMGBritish Ambassador to the US, 1997-2003 “Britain in the World: Still Looking for a Role?” Sir Christopher Meyer will be speaking on Tuesday,March 27th, 4:00 pm-5pm in The East RoomMorehead-Cain Office located on the second floor of the Morehead Planetarium Building, East Wing250 East Franklin Street, Chapel Hill, NC 27514 The lecture is free and open to the publicSponsored by the Center for European Studies, Honors, the History Department, The Scholars Program, and the Morehead-Cain Program The topic of Ambassador Meyer’s lecture comes from his testimony to the Chilcot inquiry into Britain’s role in the Iraq war and his book: Getting our Way: 500 Years of Adventure and Intrigue: The Inside Story of British Diplomacy. Ambassador Meyer’s book accompanies a major three-part television documentary series for the BBC. The lecture will cover current diplomatic issues, including Afghanistan and Iraq, the relationship between force and diplomacy, the limits of multilateral diplomacy and of direct contact, and the role of humiliation in foreign policy. SIR CHRISTOPHER MEYER, KCMG:British Ambassador to the United States, 1997-2003British Ambassador to Germany, 1997Chairman of the Press Complaints Commission, 2003-2009Sir Christopher Meyer, Honorary Fellow of Peterhouse, Cambridge, was educated at Lancing College, the Lycee Henri IV, Paris, and Peterhouse, Cambridge, where he read History. After Cambridge, he spent a year at the Paul Nitze School of Advanced International Studies in Bologna, Italy. Sir Christopher joined the Diplomatic Service in 1966. After two years in London, he was posted to Moscow from 1968 to 1970, and then to Madrid from 1970 to 1973. He became speech-writer to the Foreign Secretary. In this capacity he worked until 1978 for three Foreign Secretaries. On returning to London in 1984, he spent four years as Foreign Office Spokesman and Press Secretary to the then Foreign Secretary, Sir Geoffrey Howe (Later Lord Howe of Aberavon).In 1988-89 he spent a sabbatical year as a Visiting Fellow at Harvard University’s Centre for International Affairs. He served for two years Government Spokesman and Press Secretary to the Prime Minister. After serving as British Ambassador to the Federal Republic of Germany from March 1997 to October 1997, Sir Christopher was appointed Ambassador to the United States from October 1997 to February 2003, the longest period since the Second World War.Sir Christopher became Chairman of the Press Complaints Commission in March 2003.Sir Christopher was made Knight Commander, Order of St Michael and St George in 1998.In 2005 Sir Christopher published a book of memoirs entitled “DC Confidential.”This semester Sir Christopher is teaching PWAD 490, “Empire and Diplomacy” with UNC Professor Theodore H. Leinbaugh OBE.

“Do We Understand Civil Wars? Comparing the US and Korean Civil Wars. - Mar 26th 2012

PWAD Majors,
Dr. Allan R. Millett, one of the leading military historians in the country, who is currently working on the Korean War era, will be presenting to Dr. Glatthaar’s class on Monday, March 26. The presentation will be open to any PWAD major who wants to attend.

The title is:
“Do We Understand Civil Wars? Comparing the U.S. and Korean Civil Wars.”

The class is Mon, 2-3:15, in Howell 104

Major General Jon Lilland - Mar 26th 2012

MGEN Lilland will discuss agenda issues for the
NATO Chicago Summit May 2012
Lunch will be provided

POC: Jennifer Boyle (Jennifer.boyle@duke.edu)
Office: 919.613.9301 | Cell: 704.488.6740

Sending Young Men to the Barracks - Mar 23rd 2012

The Research Triangle Seminar Series on the History of Military, War and Society

invites

Friederike Bruehoefener (UNC-Chapel Hill),

Sending Young Men to the Barracks:

West Germany’s Struggle over the Establishment of New Armed Forces in the 1950s

Friday, 23 March 2012

4:00 – 6:00 pm – Duke University

East Campus – Carr Building 114 Campus Drive – Room 229

In light of the Berlin Blockade (1948/49) and the outbreak of the Korean War (1950), the Western allies decided that the newly founded Federal Republic of Germany needed to be integrated into a Western defense community. This political move was welcomed by the Adenauer government, but faced severe opposition in the West German society, as large parts of society had to come to terms with the prospect of once again sending young men to the barracks. Since compulsory military service was defined solely as a man’s duty, many of the subsequent debates about West Germany’s rearmament centered on the question of how military life in barracks would shape and influence attitude and behavior of the Bürger in Uniform (male citizen in uniform). In this context, members of the parliament, representatives of the Ministry of Defense, church groups and social workers struggled to delineate acceptable behavioral and morale traits for the West German man in uniform. This struggle, the paper argues, was an important aspect of the overall attempt to fashion military forces that could be integrated into the newly established West German society.

Friederike Bruehoefener is a doctoral candidate in the Department of History at UNC Chapel Hill. She finished her B.A. in History and German at the University Bielefeld, Germany in 2005. After spending a year as an exchange student in the Department of History at Johns Hopkins University, she completed her M.A. at the University Bielefeld in 2007. Her research and teaching interests include modern German and European history, history of masculinities, gender history, and cultural history.

The seminar starts at 4:15 pm.

Refreshments will be served before the seminar.

A pre-circulated paper is available a week in advance at fbruehoe@email.unc.edu.

For more information on Research Triangle Seminar Series on the History of Military, War and Society, see the website: http://www.unc.edu/mhss/.

This seminar is co-sponsored by the Triangle Institute for Security Studies.

The ORGANIZERS of the “History of the Military, War and Society Seminar” in the academic year 2011-12 are:

Dirk Bonker (Duke University)

Karen Hagemann (UNC at Chapel Hill)

Susanna Michele Lee (NC State University)

in cooperation with

Friederike Bruehoefener (UNC at Chapel Hill)

Andrew Byers (Duke University)

Joseph Glatthaar (UNC at Chapel Hill)

Richard Kohn (UNC at Chapel Hill)

Anna Krylova (Duke University)

Wayne Lee (UNC at Chapel Hill)

Alex Roland (Duke University)

Progression of Kuwaiti-US Relations - Mar 23rd 2012

March 23, 2012 (10:00 – 11:30 am | Flowers 201 | Duke University)
Flowers 201 | Duke University
Progression of Kuwaiti-US Relations

Lunch and Learn: Passing the Baton (Korea) - Mar 23rd 2012

Kim Jong-un’s accession as North Korea’s supreme leader, following the unexpected death of his father, Kim Jong-il, has highlighted the world’s most secretive and dangerous nation. Known for its ruthless determination in the pursuit of nuclear power, this mysterious throwback to the Cold War has been considered a security threat by all nations for over seven decades.

Duke University Professor Hwansoo Kim will discuss the complex and dangerous implications of North Korea’s policies and nuclear programs for global peace at our Lunch and Learn meeting on March 28. Reservations can be made by $18 check payable to “UNAWTC” sent to Warren Glick, 83203 Jarvis, Chapel Hill 27517 (or for our Carolina Meadows members, left at Jody Hite’s office) by March 23. http://www.una-westtriangle.org/lunchandlearnregistrationform.htm

The Global Significance of Arabic Language and Literature - Mar 22nd 2012

March 22, 2012 (6:00 – 7:30 pm | John Hope Franklin Center | Room 240)
The Global Significance of Arabic Language and Literature—a lecture by Professor Carl Ernst
Response by H.E. Ambassador Salem Al-Sabah (Kuwait)

Undercover in Syria (Frontline, PBS) - Mar 22nd 2012

The Ebb and Flow of Democratization: A Lecture with Larry Diamond - Mar 22nd 2012

The curriculum in Global Studies is pleased to present:

The Ebb and Flow of Democratization:
A Lecture with Larry Diamond
Thursday, March 22 | 5:30 PM | Nelson Mandela Auditorium, FedEx Global Education Center

Larry Diamond is one of the foremost experts on establishing democracy across the globe. He has served as a consultant to the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and advised the World Bank, the United Nations and the State Department, among other organizations.

Diamond is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, where he directs the Center for Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law. He is also the founding co-editor of the Journal of Democracy and serves as a senior consultant at the International Forum for Democratic Studies of the National Endowment for Democracy.

During 2004, Diamond acted as a senior adviser on governance to the Coalition Provisional Authority in Baghdad. He has since written extensively on the challenges of stabilization and reconstruction in post-conflict countries. His latest book, The Spirit of Democracy: The Struggle to Build Free Societies Throughout the World draws on this experience, as he explores the sources of democratic progress and stress and the prospects for future democratic expansion.

Based out of Stanford University, where he is a professor in political science and sociology, Diamond has taught extensively on comparative democratic development and post-conflict democracy building. In 2007, his passion for his subject earned him the Dinkelspiel Award for Distinctive Contributions to Undergraduate Education for his popular classes, which according to students “transcend political and ideological barriers.”

For more information on Larry Diamond, visit http://www.stanford.edu/~ldiamond/

Co-sponsored by the support of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Global Education Fund and the Center for Global Initiatives.

How Accurate are media portrayls of the Arab Spring - Mar 22nd 2012

Re p r e s e n t i n g t h e “Arab spring” How accurate are media portrayals of the “Arab Spring”?
March 22, 2012, 5 pm, 111 Carroll Hall
(Flyer Attached)

Amjad Atallah, Bureau Chief for Al-Jazeera English – the Americas and James Gelvin, UCLA professor and author of the Arab Uprisings.

Cosponsors: Department of History, School of Journalism and Mass Communications, Curriculum in Peace, War and Defense, Triangle Institute for
Security Studies, Duke‐UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies, Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations.

Another March Madness - Mar 16th 2012

Another March Madness: The American Civil War at 150
Featuring speakers from Duke, UNC, NC State, and Ohio State

Location: Perkins Library Gothic Room, Duke University

To be followed by a reception in the Rare Book Room, Perkins Library

Date: March 16, 2012

Time: 9:00 am to 7:00 pm

This event is free and open to the public!

Come and hear prominent speakers from Duke University, University of North Carolina, North Carolina State and Ohio State reflect on the American Civil War 150 years later. The speakers will focus on a number of broad themes including the social, cultural, medical and military aspects of the American Civil War. The symposium will coincide with two Civil War exhibits in the Perkins Library — one a broad Civil War exhibit entitled, “I Recall the Experience Sweet and Sad: Memories of the Civil War.” The other will showcase Duke University’s rich Civil War medicine collection.

View our Program Schedule, our Guest Speakers, Special Thanks to our sponsors and supporters, and Visitor Information for those who would like to attend the event.

Twitter Follow us on Twitter!

For more information please contact Dr. Shauna Devine at shauna.devine@duke.edu

From West Point to Guantánamo: Patriotism, Freedom, and Security - Mar 16th 2012

UNC MSA presents:
From West Point to Guantánamo:
Patriotism, Freedom, and Security

Thursday, March 15th, 7pm Stone Center Auditorium

Come out for a candid discussion of the intersection of security dynamics, religious tension, and patriotism with former Guantánamo Bay Chaplin James “Yusuf” Yee.

The event is free and open to the public

Former Army Muslim Chaplain
at Guantanamo Bay
Former Guantanamo Bay US Army Chaplain James Yusuf Yee joins us. He spent his deployment at Gitmo ministering to the Muslim detainees. Yee made headlines back in 2003 when he was arrested and spent 76 days in solitary confinement, charged with spying on the US, among other things, and then being released with all charges dropped. He’s written a book about his experiences at Gitmo and about freedom of speech

Inside the State Department (National Geographic - Mar 15th 2012

Peter Paret talks Clausewitz - Mar 15th 2012

PWAD Majors,
Many of you have suffered through my explanation(s) of Clausewitz.
Many of you will soon do so. Dr. Peter Paret, the leading translator of his work into English, and a distinguished military historian, will be here at UNC on March 15th, to give a talk about Clausewitz, and his understanding of Frederick the Great. If I couldn’t make it clear to you, perhaps Dr. Paret can!

Flyer attached.
4pm Hamilton 569.


Wayne E. Lee

“Energy in the 21st Century: Could Muir, Patton, and Gandhi Agree on a Program?” – a lecture and discussion - Mar 15th 2012

Topic: “Energy in the 21st Century: Could Muir, Patton, and Gandhi Agree on a Program?” – a lecture and discussion

Date: Thursday 15 March

Location: North Carolina State University Centennial Campus, Golden Leaf BTEC – Auditorium

Time: 1 – 2:30 pm

More information: WOOLSEY AT NCSU

You may reserve a seat by logging onto the link provided above.

Inquiries about the NCSU event should be addressed to Carolyn Pumphrey (pumphrey@duke.edu)

R. James Woolsey is Chairman of Woolsey Partners LLC and a Venture Partner with Lux Capital Management. Over the course of a dozen years, Woolsey held presidential appointments in two Republican and two Democratic administrations, including one stint as undersecretary of the Navy and another as director of the Central Intelligence Agency under President Clinton, from 1993 to 1995. In recent years, Mr. Woolsey has become an influential voice in the energy debate. He is known for articulating the national security arguments for reducing dependence on fossil fuels and moving towards distributed generation. He has argued his views in important publications such as The Wall Street Journal and played key roles within the Energy Future Coalition and the National Commission on Energy Policy. These are nonpartisan groups of experts in business, labor, the environment, and national security that are pressing for a more forward-looking energy strategy.

Energy in the 21st Century: Could Muir, Patton and Gandhi Agree on a Program? - Mar 15th 2012

The Triangle Institute for Security Studies and North Carolina State University Energy and Security Initiative is delighted to invite you to a public lecture by R. James Woolsey, “Energy in the 21st Century: Could Muir, Patton, and Gandhi Agree on a Program?” The talk will be on the Centennial Campus of North Carolina State University in the Gold Leaf BTEC (Thursday 15 March, 1 pm – 2:30 pm).

“Energy Security and American Grand Strategy” – a conversation - Mar 14th 2012

The Triangle Institute for Security Studies together with a variety of departments and institutions at Duke and North Carolina State University are delighted to present Director R. James Woolsey. He will be speaking on “Energy” on the Duke campus on March 14th (evening) and on the North Carolina State University on March 15th (early afternoon). For more details, follow the links below.

Topic: “Energy Security and American Grand Strategy” – a conversation

Date: Wednesday 14 March

Location: Duke University, Sanford School, Fleishman Commons

Time: 5:00-6:15 pm

More information: WOOLSEY at DUKE

There is no registration for this event.

Inquiries about the Duke event should be addressed to Boyle ( jennifer.boyle@duke.edu

Making Sense of the New Middle East: The Dynamics and Their Implications for US Interests - Mar 14th 2012

Members of the TISS community are cordially invited to attend the 2012 John William Pope Lecture given by Meghan L. O’Sullivan. The event is presented by the School of Public and International Affairs, College of Humanities and Social Sciences and Department of Economics, Poole College of Management, North Carolina State University.

Talk: “Making Sense of the New Middle East: The Dynamics and Their Implications for US Interests”

Speaker: Meghan L. O’Sullivan, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University

Date: Tuesday, March 13

Time: 7.30 p.m.

Place: Withers 232 A, NC State University, Raleigh

Reception immediately following in Withers common area.

For Directions see Map: http://www.ncsu.edu/campus_map/north.htm Withers is #43; parking on Boney Drive [SAS Hall], Hillsborough Street [North Hall], Dunn Dr. [Coliseum Parking Deck]).

Meghan L. O’Sullivan is the Jeane Kirkpatrick Professor of the Practice of International Affairs at Harvard University’s Kennedy School. Her expertise includes the geopolitics of energy, decision making in foreign policy, nation-building, counterinsurgency, and the Middle East. Between 2004 and 2007, she was special assistant to President George W. Bush and Deputy National Security Advisor for Iraq and Afghanistan during the last two years of this tenure. She spent two years in Iraq, most recently in the fall of 2008 to help conclude the security agreement and strategic framework agreement between the United States and Iraq. Prior to this, Dr. O’Sullivan was senior director for strategic planning and Southwest Asia in the NSC; political advisor to the Coalition Provisional Authority administrator and deputy director for governance in Baghdad; chief advisor to the presidential envoy to the Northern Ireland peace process; and a fellow at the Brookings Institution. Her publications include Shrewd Sanctions: Statecraft and State Sponsors of Terrorism (2003). Dr. O’Sullivan is an adjunct senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, a consultant to the National Intelligence Council, and a strategic advisor to John Hess, the Chairman and CEO of Hess Corporation, an American independent oil and gas company. She is also a foreign affairs columnist for Bloomberg View, a director on the board of TechnoServe, a non-profit organization bringing business solutions to help alleviate poverty, as well as a member of the Council of Foreign Relations, the Trilateral Commission, and the Aspen Strategy Group. She is also an advisor to Mitt Romney, a candidate for the Republican nomination for U.S. president. Dr. O’Sullivan has been awarded the Defense Department’s highest honor for civilians, the Distinguished Public Service Medal, and three times been awarded the State Department’s Superior Honor Award. In 2008, Esquire Magazine named her one of the most influential people of the century. She holds a doctorate in Politics and a master’s in Economics from Oxford University and a B.A. from Georgetown University.

The Burmese Spring A lecture with Andrew Reynolds - Mar 05th 2012

The UNC curriculum in Global Studies and the Carolina Asia Center present

The Burmese Spring
A lecture with Andrew Reynolds

Thursday, April 5 | 12:30 PM – 1:30 PM | Room 1009, FedEx Global Education Center

The people of the South-East Asian nation of Burma have endured a half century of repressive military rule. But over the last six months, the country has begun to transform. Political prisoners have been freed, the military installed government has engaged with America, and opposition politicians are now able to campaign more freely than before.

The iconic pro-democracy leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, is currently campaigning across the country for the state’s April 1st elections. While there are not enough districts up for election to change the government, these elections mark a watershed moment for change in Burma.

Professor Andrew Reynolds, Chair of UNC’s Curriculum in Global Studies will speak on the prospects for democracy in Burma at a special event at 12.30pm on Thursday April 5th in room 1009 of the FedEx Global Education Center. Reynolds has made three trips to Burma since 2005, his most recent last month.

MEMS Lunchtime talk - Feb 29th 2012

MEMS Lunchtime Talk (Cosponsored by TISS)
February 29, 12:00 pm -1:00 pm
Hamilton Hall 569, UNC-Chapel Hill Campus
Svat Soucek, Dorothy Ford Wiley Visiting Professor of Renaissance Culture
“Five Famous Ottoman Turks of the Sixteenth Century.’

Svat Soucek is a distinguished retired professor of Ottoman history whose primary interest is in maritime history. He has written on Turkish mapmaking, on Ottoman naval history and maritime geography. His talk will focus on the role of sea power between 1499 and 1571. in the age of the Ottoman Empire’s naval dominance.

A map of the UNC campus is attached, with Hamilton Hall highlighted in yellow. Those of you coming from off campus might try parking in the Planetarium Parking lot or (a bit further away ) the Municipal Parking deck off E. Rosemary. There is also a lot (not marked on this map) off the Old Raleigh Road (Highway 54).

- Feb 24th 2012

In this documentary, photojournalist Danfung Dennis follows the wartime journey of 25-year-old Sergeant Nathan Harris of the US Marine Corps, beginning with stunning war reportage and continuing with an intimate portrayal of Harris’ reintegration into civilian life at home in North Carolina.
This film is part of the ACKLAND FILM FORUM and is presented in connection with The Making of a King: Henry IV and Henry V by William Shakespeare, on stage at PlayMakers Repertory Theater 29 Jan – 4 Mar 2012. Sponsored by PlayMakers Repertory Company.
For more info visit: http://bit.ly/AcklandFilmForum

Ambassador: Inside the Embassy” - Feb 24th 2012

Scholar in Residence Program on Global Affairs Issues

“Ambassador: Inside the Embassy,” by National Geographic. Thursday, February 23rd, 6:00-7:00 PM, Craige Coffee House. (Snacks and Drinks)

This unique National Geographic film goes behind-the-scenes for a close look at the role and activities of U.S. Ambassadors abroad, focusing on the Ambassadors in Pakistan, Honduras, and Japan. You’ll see the human side of diplomacy in all its complexity, intensity and, sometimes, danger. UNC’s Diplomat-in-Residence Bill Lucas, a 32-year veteran of the State Department’s Foreign Service, will host the film screening and follow-up discussion.

A UNC graduate himself (’73), Bill backpacked and motorcycled through Africa for a year after leaving Chapel Hill. With State, he served abroad in Africa, Europe, East Asia, and South Asia, and just returned from Afghanistan last July. He is willing to discuss careers in global affairs, and life and work in the Foreign Service. Bill keeps office hours at the Career Services office (second floor, Hanes) every other Friday. Contact Lisa Bowden (LTBowden@email.unc.edu) for an appointment.

Mini-Conference on Security - Feb 27th 2012

Security has become a ubiquitous theme in our daily living, encompassing
a very wide and diverse range of social situations and cultural
phenomena. These include — but are not limited to – immigration,
disasters, legislation, privacy, the military, surveillance, crime and
violence, policing, race and ethnic relations, gender dynamics,
religious and cultural identity, public events, tourism, sports, social
movements, architecture, urban planning and design, governing,
citizenship, technology, education, the media and news-making, welfare, poverty,
environmental destruction, individual well-being, and more. How do
dynamics associated with the theme of security help shape ways in which
we relate to each other, our cultural understandings of safety and
order, or our individual and collective decision making locally and
globally? What can sociology contribute to our empirical,
methodological, and theoretical understanding of these dynamics?

The deadline for submission of abstracts (250 words max) is Sunday, October 30.

Please submit your abstracts directly to
http://www.meetingsavvy.com/ess/login.aspx

Under the keyword drop-down menu, select “Mini Conference: Sociology of Security”

If you have questions, please contact

Vida Bajc
Methodist University
vbajc@methodist.edu
and
Polly Sylvia
Baruch College
Polly.Sylvia@baruch.cuny.edu

The Past, Present and Future of Guantanamo Bay - Feb 24th 2012

Duke’s chapter of the Alexander Hamilton Society (AHS) presents “The Past, Present, and Future of Guantanamo Bay” – a discussion between Charles Stimson (Heritage Foundation) and Tim Nichols (Duke) moderated by Scott Silliman (Duke Law) on Thursday, February 23rd, 2012 from 5:30pm-6:30pm in Von Canon C in the Bryan Center. There will be refreshments!!!

WHAT: Panel Discussion about GITMO
WHEN: Thursday, February 23rd from 5:30pm-6:30pm
WHERE: Von Canon C in the Bryan Center

“The Hamilton Society will build a national network of these outstanding students and faculty which will provide what our universities have failed to produce: vital, constructive debate on foreign, economic, and national security policy, as well as opportunities for students to flourish intellectually, professionally, and personally. No other organization has undertaken this effort.”

Charles Stimson (click here for bio)
Tim Nichols (click here for bio)
Scott Silliman (click here for bio)
Please contact Nick Setterberg with any questions at nick.setterberg@duke.edu or (206) 406-7546.

Arab Spring Event @ Duke - Feb 18th 2012

Reckford Lecture - Feb 18th 2012

EventSexual Assault in the Armed Forces: Sexual Assault in the Armed Forces: A Perspective on the New Legislation – A Perspective on the New Legislation - Feb 15th 2012

You are invited BY DUKE UNIVERSITY’S SCHOOL OF LAW AND THE CENTER FOR LAW, ETHICS AND NATIONAL SECURITY to a talk by Lt Col Kate Oler, USAF . Colonel Oler recently completed a three-year tour as a trial judge, and has testified before Congress about sexual assault legislation. She graduated with honors from Wellesley College and earned her JD at Boston University School of Law where she was a Schulman scholar and an editor of the American Journal of Law & Medicine. She is a distinguished graduate of the U.S. Army Military Judges’ Course.

No RSVP needed.

Date: Wednesday, February 15, 12:15 p.m.—1:15 p.m. , Room 3043

Title: Sexual Assault in the Armed Forces: Sexual Assault in the Armed Forces: A Perspective on the New Legislation – A Perspective on the New Legislation

Dinner Seminar with Dr. Timothy Lomperis (RSVP Required) - Feb 10th 2012

We are delighted to present to our community yet another old friend of TISS and Duke Ph.D. – Dr. Timothy Lomperis. He has just published a new work on Vietnam ‘The Vietnam War from the Rear Echelon: An Intelligence Officer’s Memoir, 1972–1973’ in which he draws on his personal experiences at the Military Assistance Command, Vietnam (MACV). In this account, he exposes the inner workings of a military headquarters during wartime and provides insights into the tensions of a command caught between the political imperatives of Washington and the deteriorating military situation on the ground.
On Thursday, February 9th Professor Lomperis will give a dinner talk at the Friday Center in Chapel Hill. (Flyer attached). The dinner will begin at 7 PM. In his talk, Lomperis will focus on the bureaucratic and strategic tussles within this Command during the Easter Invasion (1972-3). To reserve a seat, please register on the TISS web site: LOMPERIS RESERVATION. Registration will close on February 6th or when the all seats are taken. Please address any questions to me (pumphrey@duke.edu).

Annual Graduate Strategic Studies Conference - Feb 11th 2012

The 14th Annual Graduate Strategic Studies Conference will take place February 10 and 11, 2012 at the University of Calgary. The graduate students of the Centre for Military and Strategic Studies invite researchers to share their work on security, strategy, or defence.

Original and innovative ideas that challenge present understandings are encouraged and international perspectives are welcome. The conference is open to both undergraduate and graduate students from all disciplines. Assistance with travel costs may be available.

Suggested topics include: Aerospace security, Arctic security, Canadian military and security, conflict, cooperation, counterinsurgency, emerging threats, environmental security, geopolitical issues, human security, immigration, intelligence, irregular warfare, maritime security, military history, peace building, resource security, strategic thought, and terrorism.

Proposals including contact information, a short biography, and a 250-word abstract should be sent to info@strategyconference.ca.
Please confine presentations to a 15-minute format.
Deadline for Proposals: December 12, 2011.

Jerusalem - Feb 07th 2012

J Street UNC: Jerusalem, Settlements, and the Two-State Solution–a lecture from Daniel

Seidemann

Monday, February 6th at 5:30pm in the Nelson Mandela Auditorium of the FedEx Global Education Center.

Daniel Seidemann is considered by many to be the world’s leading expert on the geopolitics of the city of Jerusalem. He is often the first call made by American diplomats hoping to understand the complexities of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. He is also known to be a profoundly passionate educator of the thousands of students to whom he has spoken about the issues as part of his ongoing work.

Sponsored by J Street UNC, Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies, the Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense, and North Carolina Hillel.

Mr. Seidemann founded and directs Terrestrial Jerusalem, an Israeli NGO working to explore the nuanced and difficult social and legal realities within the living city of Jerusalem.

Join Mr. Seidemann in a discussion and Q & A about the political changes needed to make Jerusalem a peaceful and holy city for both Israelis and Palestinians.

Hugo Chavez and the Bolivarian Movement in Latin America Ambassador Patrick Duddy - Jan 26th 2012

Hugo Chavez and the Bolivarian Movement in Latin America
Ambassador Patrick Duddy
Jan. 26, 2012
4:30pm-6:00pm
Rhodes Conference Room, Sanford School of Public Policy
*Appetizers and drinks provided
This is the first in a three part “tertulia” (informal discussion) series with Ambassador Duddy.

The Great Game Goes On: Afghanistan in the Future. - Jan 26th 2012

RSVP Required. Registration will close when room limit is reached.
To Register go to http://sanford.duke.edu/centers/tiss/Goodson2012.php
Click on The Great Game Registration and submit requested information.
Please address questions to pumphrey@duke.edu

Dr. Larry Goodson is a Professor of Middle East Studies at the U.S. Army War College. He is the author of Afghanistan’s Endless War: State Failure, Regional Politics, and the Rise of the Taliban (2000). In the spring and summer of 2002, he was a consultant to the Afghan Loya Jirga that chose Hamid Karzai as first president of the new republic of Afghanistan. Professor Goodson received his BA in Political Science at the University of North Carolina in 1984, and his Ph.D. at UNC in 1990.

Professor Goodson will join us January 26 from 12:30-2:00 in Hamilton 569 UNC-Chapel Hill for a lunchtime discussion on “The Great Game Goes On: Afghanistan in the Future.” Lunch will be provided. Participants are encouraged to read his recent article in Orbis (2011), “Parallels with the Past – How the Soviets Lost in Afghanistan, How the Americans are Losing” in preparation for the event.

Capt CC Felker - Jan 26th 2012

We are delighted to welcome back to North Carolina Capt. CC Felker, USN, whom some of you came to know when he was a graduate student at Duke University. He is currently a professor at the US Naval Academy and just returned from Afghanistan where he served as command historian for NATO-Training Mission Afghanistan. He will give a talk on Wednesday, January 25th at 7:30 pm at the Friday Center in Chapel Hill. This is a unique opportunity to learn about the fascinating and important work of this command which is developing the Afghan National Security Forces (army, air force, and police) that will be so crucial to the future stability of this region.

Crises of Capitalism - Jan 26th 2012

“Crises of Capitalism”: A Lecture/Panel Discussion
Fascinated by the flood of news coming in from Greece, Italy, Spain, and the EU regarding economic turmoil? Clueless as to how bad financial and governmental policies precipitated these crises? Wondering about the short-term and long-term effects of this economic crisis on the social movements, living standards, and human rights of Europeans and Americans?
Mark your calendar: Wednesday, January 25 at 6:00 PM in Bingham 301.
Join Global Alliance, UNC’s international justice organization, and the Roosevelt Institute’s Social Justice Center for an exciting double lecture and panel discussion called the “Crises of Capitalism”. This event will feature Professor John D. Stephens, Chair of UNC’s European Studies department, and Dr. Niamh Hardiman, an Irish political economist visiting with the Global Research Institute, speaking on the European financial crisis, but with a socio-political twist. Both will give fascinating 20-minute addresses, followed by a Q&A session from the audience. This event seeks to explore how flawed economic policies can wreak havoc on not only our financial systems, but also our living standards and social movements.
How have austerity packages on states that have defaulted affected the impacts of the economic downturn? What effect have these events had on the surrounding region, and even us in the United States? How might this crisis and response differ from other international financial interventions in the past? Who comprises the responding social movements, and how will they impact the social and political climate? As globalization continues to expand and economies worldwide become increasingly connected, it is critical that our campus community stay informed and respond appropriately. We look forward to seeing you on Wednesday night at 6 PM for a lively discussion!

A Single Roll of the Dice - Jan 26th 2012

Have the diplomatic efforts of the Obama administration toward Iran failed? How can the United States address ongoing turmoil in Tehran

Lunch and Learn: The Arab Spring - Jan 25th 2012

Professor Reynolds will be speaking to us on the subject “The Arab Spring: Uprisings, Revolutions, and Wars” at the UNA Lunch & Learn meeting (Noon-2PM) on January 25 at Carolina Meadows. Reservations may be made by $18 check to “UNAWTC” and sent to Warren Glick 83203 Jarvis, Chapel Hill 27517 by January 20. Forms can be found at http://www.una-westtriangle.org/lunchandlearnregistrationform.htm

Lunch and Learn to Take Up “The Arab Spring: Uprisings, Revolutions, and Wars” at January Meeting
A revolutionary phenomenon whose implications are still playing out, the “Arab Spring” is changing the face of Middle East politics. It began a year ago in Tunisia with a young fruit vendor in Tunisia setting himself on fire to protest a slap in the face by a low-level government functionary seeking a bribe, and swept like wildfire through Egypt and more than a half-dozen other Middle East countries, toppling three government heads along the way.

The implications of the upheaval are many and varied, but one sure result will be the need for the political systems and governments of the affected countries to be redesigned according to the new conditions that will evolve in each country – a process that has already begun. Our January Lunch and Learn speaker, Professor Andrew Reynolds, Chair of UNC’s Department of Global Studies, is already involved in helping affected governments to sort out their responses. Professor Reynolds is a foremost expert on democratization, constitutional design and electoral politics whose research and teaching focus on democratization, constitutional design and electoral politics. When he’s not teaching at UNC, he serves as a consultant for the United Nations, the UK Department for International Development, the US State Department and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), assisting governments – some 25 to date in Africa, Asia, the Middle East (including Egypt and Libya) and Latin America – to address these issues. Widely published in eight languages, he’s written many books and articles in these fields and is currently working on a book on the Arab Spring.

“‘Feared by many, loved by none’: Relationships among Young Continental Soldiers and Civilians.” - Jan 20th 2012

Dear TEAHS members,

We hope you can join us for our first meeting of the year next Friday (1/20) for Jake Ruddiman’s paper, “‘Feared by many, loved by none’: Relationships among Young Continental Soldiers and Civilians.” Jake teaches at Wake Forest University.

We will gather at the National Humanities Center at 4 pm.

Best,
Jonathan and Kathleen

A Conversation with Amb John Negroponte - Jan 18th 2012

TISS/AGS invites you to “A Conversation with Amb. John Negroponte”, Tuesday, 1/17, 6pm, in Sanford 05. Ambassador John Negroponte served as the United States Deputy Secretary of State and as the first ever Director of National Intelligence DNI, and he is currently a research fellow and lecturer in international affairs at Yale University’s Jackson Institute for Global Affairs.
John Negroponte served in the United States Foreign Service from 1960 to 1997. From 1981 to 1996, he had tours of duty as United States ambassador in Honduras, Mexico, and the Philippines. After leaving the Foreign Service, he subsequently served in the Bush Administration as U.S. permanent representative to the United Nations from 2001 to 2004, and was ambassador to Iraq from June 2004 to April 2005.

UNA West Triangle Lunch and Learn - Dec 13th 2011

For over a century the balance of power among the world’s strongest nations was the dominant issue in discussions of global security. Many of today’s post-World War II U.S. policies, and international institutions like the U.N., were created to deal with conflicts between them.
But today fragile states such as the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Bosnia, East Timor, and Haiti, are emerging as the most serious threat to global security. These countries straddle the thin line between survival and chaos, suffering from weak governments, internal conflict, ethnic conflict, poverty and sometimes all of these. Fragile states’ weaknesses often permit extremist groups to thrive within their borders, create breeding grounds for disease pandemics, stimulate mass migrations, and offer safe havens for terrorists, drugs or arms traders, and for human traffickers.
In October, the West Triangle Chapter hosted a conference at UNC to consider the challenges posed by these states. Now, on Wednesday, December 14th, in an innovative interactive session using a DVD presentation, West Triangle Chapter members will have the opportunity at our special Lunch and Learn meeting to learn about these challenges and consider what they mean to us and the larger global community. The session aims to encourage discussion of ways to promote stronger nations and deal more effectively with those that are already on the brink of failure. We encourage you to come prepared to discuss the following questions:
– Do you believe that fragile states are a greater global threat than traditional super powers today?
– Can you think of any countries besides those named above, that might currently be called a fragile state?
– Should the United States ever intervene directly in a fragile state or should it always act in concert with other countries or as a part of the United Nations?
The meeting will be held at the usual time and place – Carolina Meadows from Noon-2:00 pm.
Reservations should be sent to Warren Glick, 83203 Jarvis, Chapel Hill, NC 27517 by December 9th along with a check for $18 made out to “UNAUSA West Triangle Chapter”. Forms can be found at http://www.una-westtriangle.org/lunchandlearnregistrationform.htm

American Grand Strategy in China - Dec 07th 2011

I am happy to invite you to our last event of the semester, Dan Blumenthal’s presentation on “American Grand Strategy and China.”

The talk will take place on Wed, Dec 7th, 4:00-5:15pm, in Rubenstein 153 .

Dan Blumenthal is the director of Asian Studies at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI), where he focuses on East Asian security issues and on Sino-American relations. He has recently been named a research associate in the National Asia Research Program, a joint undertaking of the National Bureau of Asian Research and the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. He has served on the US-China Economic and Security Review Commission since 2005, including as vice chairman in 2007, and has been a member of the Academic Advisory Board for the congressional US-China Working Group. Previously, Mr. Blumenthal was senior director for China, Taiwan, and Mongolia in the office of the secretary of defense for international security affairs during George W. Bush’s first administration. He has written articles and op-eds for the Washington Post, theWall Street Journal, the Weekly Standard, National Review, and numerous edited volumes. He will publish a book early next year entitled, Bridging the Gap, an economic and national security view of China.
He will publish a book early next year entitled, Bridging the Gap, an economic and national security view of China.

If you have additional questions regarding this event, please contact Jennifer Boyle at Jennifer.boyle@duke.edu.

HMWS Seminar:Susanna Lee, The Antithesis of Union Men and Confederate Rebels: Loyal Citizenship in the Post-Civil War South - Dec 02nd 2011

Research Triangle Seminar Series on the History of Military, War and Society invites you to attend Friday, 2 December 2011 4:00 – 6:00 pm – Duke UniversityEast Campus – Carr Building 114 Campus Drive – Room 229 Susanna Lee (North Carolina State University) The Antithesis of Union Men and Confederate Rebels: Loyal Citizenship in the Post-Civil War South After the American Civil War, former enemies waged new battles over reunion, most pressingly over citizenship in the reunited nation. In these postwar discussions of citizenship, loyalty became a key source of contention. Many Republicans favored restricting certain rights and privileges of citizenship according to wartime loyalties. Many Democrats, in contrast, supported restoring citizenship according to postwar loyalties. This paper explores competing definitions of loyalty through the Southern Claims Commission, a postwar agency that awarded compensation to “loyal citizens” for wartime property losses, and specifically focuses on white male claimants. In their rulings, the commissioners adhered to past loyalty, requiring southerners to prove that they had acted as loyal citizens during the war through specific Union contributions. Many claimants could not meet these standards, often arguing that they had been able to do little more than privately sympathize with the Union cause. The commissioners refused to accept Union sympathies without Union contributions as evidence of loyal citizenship. The paper argues that the definition of loyal citizenship advanced by the commission ultimately encouraged the celebration of devoted voters and soldiers on both sides. Susanna Lee is an assistant professor of history at North Carolina State University in the History Department. She is currently working on a book manuscript on citizenship in the post-Civil War South under contract with Cambridge University Press. The seminar starts at 4:15 pm. Refreshments will be served before the seminar.A pre-circulated paper is available a week in advance at fbruehoe@email.unc.eduFor more information see the website: http://www.unc.edu/mhss/. The ORGANIZERS of the “History of the Military, War and Society Seminar” in the academic year 2011-12 are:Co-sponsored by the Triangle Institute for Security Studies Dirk Bonker (Duke University)Karen Hagemann (UNC at Chapel Hill)Susanna Michele Lee (NC State University) in cooperation with Friederike Bruehoefener (UNC at Chapel Hill)Andrew Byers (Duke University)Joseph Glatthaar (UNC at Chapel Hill)Richard Kohn (UNC at Chapel Hill)Anna Krylova (Duke University)Wayne Lee (UNC at Chapel Hill)Alex Roland (Duke University)

Nicholas Institute Seminar: Hydrological Impacts of the Vietnam War in the Mekong River Basin - Dec 01st 2011

The Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions presents

Hydrological Impacts of the Vietnam War in the Mekong River Basin

a talk by

Guillaume Lacombe
Researcher – Hydrologist
International Water Management Institute, Laos

Thursday, December 1
LSRC A158
11:30 AM-1:00 PM

Students, faculty and staff are invited to attend this presentation by Guillaume Lacombe, Hydrologist at the International Water Management Institute in Laos.

Abstract:
The Indochinese section of the Mekong Basin has been subjected to major environmental disturbances over the last half century. The Vietnam War is invoked as a central explanation for the extensive deforestation in specific areas while conflict-induced exoduses caused the abandonment of cultivated lands, followed by forest regeneration. Although the socio-economic and environmental consequences of these episodes have been studied, their hydrological impacts have remained unknown. This paper investigates hydrological changes in two intermediary catchments of the lower Mekong Basin that were either heavily bombed (in southern Laos) or depopulated (in northern Laos). This analysis is based on the widely and independently recognized fact that vegetation, via evapotranspiration, is a central driver of basin water yield. The analysis of the most complete Vietnam War US Air Force mission database and of available hydro-meteorological data over the period 1960–2004 reveals a sharp runoff increase in the southern catchment when bombing climaxed in the early 1970s while no hydrological change is observed in the northern catchment over the same period. From 1995 onwards, the northern and southern catchment’s runoff productions are significantly lower and higher than in the pre-war conditions, respectively. Although causalities could not be ascertained because of data limitations, these short- and long-term hydrological shifts were found to be consistent, in terms of occurrence, spatial distribution and magnitude, with the expected changes in the vegetation cover, either denser in the north (in response to abandonment of cultivated lands) or sparser in the south (as a result of bomb-induced deforestation and soil degradations).

Questions? Please contact Ryan Bartlett: ryan.bartlett@duke.edu

Please feel free to forward this on to others who may be interested.
Apologies for duplicate postings.

Graduate Workshop: Gender, War and Nation in the Middle East - Dec 01st 2011

4:00 – 6:00 pm
UNC Institute for Arts and Humanities, Hyde Hall

Graduate Workshop:
Gender, War and Nation in the Middle East

with NADJE AL-ALI (University of London)

The Reading Seminar is open for graduate students and advanced undergraduate students. A registration is required.

Please register until 25 November 2011.
The number of participants is limited. First come first served.

Send an email to: fbruehoe@email.unc.edu
After the confirmation participants will get the reading that will be discussed.

For more information see: http://www.unc.edu/gpc/

Nadje Al-Ali is Professor of Gender Studies and Chair of the Centre for Gender Studies, at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London. Her main research interests revolve around gender theory; feminist activism; women and gender in the Middle East; transnational migration and diaspora moblization; war, conflict and reconstruction. Her publications include What Kind of Liberation? Women and the Occupation of Iraq, co-authored with Nicola Pratt (University of California Press, 2009); Iraqi Women: Untold Stories from 1948 to the Present (Zed Books, 2007); New Approaches to Migration, ed. with Khalid Koser (Routledge, 2002); Secularism, Gender and the State in the Middle East (Cambridge University Press, 2000) and Gender Writing – Writing Gender (The American University in Cairo Press, 1994) as well as numerous book chapters and journal articles. Her most recent book, co-edited with Nicola Pratt, is entitled Women and War in the Middle East: Transnational Perspectives (Zed Books, 2009). Professor Al-Ali is currently President of the Association of Middle East Women’s Studies (AMEWS). She is also a member of the Feminist Review Collective and a founding member of Act Together: Women’s Action for Iraq. (www.acttogether.org)

Gender, War and Culture - Nov 30th 2011

Gender, War and Culture Series
Conveners: UNC Series on “Gender, Politics and Culture in Europe and Beyond” and “Research Triangle Series on the History of Military, War and Society”

Co-sponsors: Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, DUKE-UNC Consortium for Middle-East Studies, UNC Center for European Studies, UNC Curriculum of Peace, War and Defense, UNC Department of Women’s Studies, UNC Institute for Arts and Humanities and Triangle Institute for Security Studies

Tuesday, 29 November 2011

5:00 – 7:00 pm
UNC Institute for Arts and Humanities, Hyde Hall

NADJE AL-ALI (University of London)
(Professor of Gender Studies and Chair of the Centre for Gender Studies, at the School of Oriental and African Studies)
Iraqi Women between Dictatorship, Sanctions, War and Occupation
Based on in-depth interviews with Iraqi women in the diaspora (US, UK, Jordan) as well as women from inside Iraq, the talk will provide a historical context to the current situation of women under occupation and political transition. It will not only address women’s deterioration of legal rights, the increase in gender-based violence, and the impact of Islamist militias and ideologies, but will also discuss women’s political mobilization and resistance to both the occupation and increasing Islamist encroachment. Because it is impossible to understand the complexity of women and gender relations in the current post-invasion period without an understanding of the changing role of women and gender over the past decades, the talk will furthermore explore the historical development in the last decades as a backdrop against the current situation of occupation and resistance: the impact of the initially secular modernist state project of Saddam Hussein’s regime, the militarization of society during the Iran-Iraq war (1980-88), the Gulf Crisis & Gulf War (1990-1991), and the subsequent economic sanctions regime (1990-2003).

The Arab Spring: Popular Revolutions in North Africa and the Middle East - Nov 19th 2011

Panel discussion hosted by the UNC Curriculum in Global Studies “The Arab Spring: Popular Revolutions in North Africa and the Middle East”Friday, November 18th5:30-7:00pmCarroll Hall Panelists Jason Brownlee, associate professor, department of government, Univ. of TexasCharlie Kurzman, professor of sociology, Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel HillTarek Masoud, assistant professor of public policy, Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of GovernmentJillian Schwedler, associate professor of politics, Univ. of MarylandCarrie Wickham, associate professor of political science, Emory Univ.

Rethinking Development Policy Lecture Series - Nov 18th 2011

Please join us as the Duke Center for International Development
presents the third Rethinking Development Policy Lecture of the Fall Semester.

Thursday, November 17, 2011 ● 5:30pm-7:30pm ● Rhodes 223
Rethinking Development Policy Lecture Series
“Collaboration between military and civilian organizations in fragile and post-conflict areas”
Moderator: Ambassador (ret.) David C. Litt, Executive Director, Center for Stabilization & Economic Reconstruction
Panelists: Lt. Commander Dan Straub, US Navy Surface Warfare Officer, Dr. Chris Seiple, President, Institute for Global Engagement
and Dr. Ron Johnson, Senior Policy Advisor, RTI International

WHERE: Rhodes 223, Sanford School of Public Policy
TIME: 5:30pm-7:30pm

Light refreshments will be served.

If you have any questions, please email Linda Scovill: linda.scovill@duke.edu.

Lunch and Learn to Hear about Eleanor Roosevelt and the UN - Nov 16th 2011

Eleanor Roosevelt’s relationship with the United Nations was momentous for the world. Appointed by President Harry Truman as a delegate to the UN General Assembly, she led the drafting of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the “founding document” of the modern human rights movement. President Truman called her the “First Lady of the World” in tribute to her achievements. William Leuchtenberg, emeritus professor of history at UNC-Chapel Hill, internationally renowned scholar of the life and career of President Franklin D. Roosevelt and award-winning author of more than a dozen books on 20th century history, will speak to our Lunch and Learn meeting about “Eleanor Roosevelt and the UN” on Wednesday, November 16, Noon-2:00pm, at Carolina Meadows retirement community. Reservations by sending an $18 check made to “UNAUSA West Triangle Chapter” to Warren Glick, 83203 Jarvis, Chapel Hill, NC 27517.

Please Note: The November meeting will be a week earlier than usual to allow ample time for members wishing to do so to spend the Thanksgiving holiday with their families.

The Nuclear Black Market - Nov 16th 2011

TISS/NCSU Energy and Security Initiative

David Albright, ISIS “The Nuclear Black Market”

Tuesday November 15, 2011 from 6:00 PM to 7:30 PM EST

Light Refreshments, 5:30 PM – 6:00PM

2304 (Erdahl Cloyd Auditorium) DH Hill Library, North Carolina State University

Free and open to the public – please forward announcement.

Nuclear proliferation remains one of the gravest threats facing the world community. The TISS-NCSU Energy and Security Initiative is delighted to announce that the distinguished nuclear proliferation expert, David Albright, Institute for Science and International Security, will be speaking on the North Carolina State University campus on November 15th. He will focus in particular on the nuclear black market.

To find out more details about the speaker and the event and to reserve a seat, please click on the link below.

http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?llr=6qfh5neab&oeidk=a07e4volw8rc223c70a

Jeremi Suri - Nov 15th 2011

The American Grand Strategy Program and the Triangle Institute for Security Studies will be hosting a public lecture by Dr. Jeremi Suri on Monday, November 14, 2011, at the Sanford School of Public Policy, room 05, from 5:30 pm – 6:45 pm. His discussion will explore key themes in his latest book: Liberty’s Surest Guardian: American Nation-Building from the Founders to Obama.
From 5:00 – 5:30 pm the Gothic Bookstore will host a book signing in room 05. Guests interested in purchasing a copy of the book may do so, and all major forms of payment are accepted.
Because of a previously scheduled event in the Fleishman Commons, we would like to encourage our attendees to enter the Sanford building through the entrance on Towerview Dr.

Jeremi Suri is an acclaimed scholar of international history. In Fall 2011, he became the first holder of the Mack Brown Distinguished Chair for Leadership in Global Affairs at the Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law with a joint appointment at the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs and the History Department at the College of Liberal Arts
at The University of Texas. Prior to that, he was professor of history and director of the European Union Center of Excellence at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is the author of three books on contemporary politics and foreign policy: Henry Kissinger and the American Century (2007), The Global Revolutions of 1968 (2007), and Power and Protest (2003). Professor Suri is a frequent contributor to newspapers and magazines, including Wired Magazine, the Chicago Tribune, the Boston Globe, The New York Times, and the International Herald Tribune. His research and teaching have received numerous prizes, including the Phi Alpha Theta Best First Book Award and the Class of 1955 Distinguished Teaching Award from the University of Wisconsin. In 2007, Smithsonian Magazinerecognized Professor Suri as one of America’s “top young innovators” in the Arts and Sciences.

Visitor parking will be available for a fee at the Bryan Center parking garage and the Science Drive visitor lot. Please contact Jennifer Boyle (Jennifer.boyle@duke.edu) for additional information.

Iraq Beyond Conflict - Nov 13th 2011

About the workshop:

Today war, conflict, and oil dominate our conception of Iraq. Join us as we look at Iraq that exists beyond war, and see the tradition, the culture, and the history that define its people today. From the first civilizations of Mesopotamia and the rise of majestic Islamic empires to today’s vibrant youth culture, the land that lies between the Tigris and Euphrates will spark your curiosity and redefine your conception of Iraq. The pioneers of modern mathematics, the forerunners of the Renaissance, and the modern symbol of cultural diversity – this is Iraq beyond conflict.

Teachers:

Note: K-12 teachers will have the opportunity to earn 1.0 CEUs for participation and completion of pre- and post-workshop activities. Resources will include online teaching materials on the art, music, literature, and history of Iraq.

How to Register:

The workshop is free, but registration is required. Please contact Outreach Director Regina Higgins at regina_higgins@unc.edu. Sponsors: Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies, UNC Department of History, UNC Honors Program

CIA Informational Meeting - Nov 10th 2011

War Stories: Alexandra Fuller - Nov 09th 2011

Tuesday, November 8th | 5:30 PM – 7:00 PM | Nelson Mandela Auditorium, FedEx Global Education Center

The final speaker of the fall semester series, bestselling author Alexandra Fuller, will discuss growing up in war-torn central Africa.

Alexandra Fuller is the bestselling author of Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight (Random, 2003), Scribbling the Cat (Penguin, 2005) and four books of non-fiction. Born in England and raised in Africa, Fuller grew up in Rhodesia during the destructive civil war of the 1970s. She has published numerous articles on the history and politics of conflict in Zimbabwe. Her most recent book Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness (Penguin, 2011) captures the passions that embody living in Africa.

Gunther E. Rothenberg Seminar in Military History - Nov 06th 2011

The theme is War in the Mediterranean World 1450-1950. The speakers are Jeremy Black, Kelly DeVries, Virginia Aksan and Niccolo Capponi. The website is: www.highpoint.edu/conferences/rothenberg It is free, but I ask that those planning to attend email me.

Dining with Jeremy Black “1918-1939” - Nov 05th 2011

The dynamic military historian Jeremy Black is visiting the United States from England. Last year he celebrated his 100th book party – if you haven’t had a chance to hear him before, you should certainly not miss this opportunity. He will be speaking on, “1918:1939” in room 569 on Friday, November 4, 2011, 11:30 am – 1:15 pm. Advanced reading (commissioned for this talk) will be posted on the website of the Triangle Institute for Security Studies – www.tiss-nc.org about a week before the event. A simple luncheon will be provided – to help us determine how much to order, we ask you to go to the following link and register. Thanks!

http://events.constantcontact.com/register/event?llr=6qfh5neab&oeidk=a07e54o7tm5d58d324b

The Great Pretend Game-Realities on the Ground in Afghanistan - Nov 03rd 2011

On behalf of the Duke Center for International Development, we would like to invite you to a public talk entitled The Great Pretend Game—Realities on the Ground in Afghanistan featuring international humanitarian journalist and author, Edward Girardet.

This event will take place on Wednesday, November 2nd from 4:00-5:30pm, in the Rhodes Conference Room, Sanford 223.

Edward Girardet, journalist and author of the recently-published book “Killing the Cranes: A Reporter’s Journey Through Three Decades of War in Afghanistan,” will speak on his experiences reporting from Afghanistan and will discuss the role of media in addressing ongoing humanitarian situations.
Girardet has been reporting on turmoil in Afghanistan since 1979, serving as a foreign correspondent for news agencies such as The Christian Science Monitor and U.S. News and World Report. He has written articles for National Geographic and helped produce documentary segments on a number of politically-urgent situations in Africa, Asia, and beyond, often working out of dangerous conflict zones.
Girardet is also a founding director of the Institute for Media and Global Governance in Geneva, Switzerland, and editor of the UK-based Crosslines Essential Media Ltd.

For more information about Edward Girardet, please visit: www.chelseagreen.com/authors/edward_girardet.

Please forward this announcement to students, groups, or other organizations that may be interested in attending this event.

Afghanistan, Pakistan ad the America Grand Strategy - Oct 27th 2011

I am happy to invite you to a public talk by one of the most senior White House national security policymakers, General Douglas Lute, the Special Assistant to the President for Afghanistan and Pakistan. The event will take place on Wednesday, Oct. 26, 5:30-6:45 pm, in Sanford 04. The title of the talk is “Afghanistan, Pakistan, and American Grand Strategy.”

Douglas Edward Lute is a service lieutenant general in the United States Army. On 15 May 2007, Lute was appointed by George W. Bush to serve as Assistant to the President and Deputy National Security Advisor for Iraq and Afghanistan, also known as the “War Czar”, a senior advisory position responsible for overseeing the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. He was kept in his post by President Barack Obama.

For additional information please contact Jennifer Boyle (Jennifer.boyle@duke.edu).

* Event co-sponsored by the Triangle Institute for Security Studies (TISS)

A Year at War - Oct 26th 2011

UNC-NPPA is proud to welcome New York Times photojournalist Damon Winter to campus for the monthly PhotoNight presentation this coming October 25, from 7:30-9 p.m in Carroll Hall 111. Winter is an acclaimed photojournalist with awards including the Pulitzer Prize and the Newspaper Photographer of the Year in Pictures of the Year International. His innovative coverage spans across the globe from disaster zones in Haiti to the war in Afghanistan, and across a variety of mediums including large format film, video and even iPhone photography.

Winter will be presenting and discuss selections of his work, including the recent, Emmy-winning “A Year at War” series that followed members of the First Battalion, 87th infantry of the 10th Mountain Division over the course of their deployment to Afganistan. A brief Q&A session will follow his presentation.

UNC-NPPA PhotoNights are free and open to the general public. Signed posters will be available before and after the presentation for $15, and a custom, signed 16″x24″ print will be raffled off, with tickets sold before the presentation at $5 each or $20 for five. All proceeds go to support UNC-NPPA programs to provide training, conversation and education in visual journalism at Chapel Hill.

Assessing and Ranking the Threats: Iran, Saudi Arabia, and Al-Qaeda and its Allies - Oct 21st 2011

he College of International Security Affairs
is pleased to announce the first speaker of the

2011/2012 Distinguished Lecture Series

Dr. Mike Scheuer

October 21st, 2011
1:00-2:30
Kennedy Auditorium

Dr. Scheuer will give an address titled

Assessing and Ranking the Threats: Iran, Saudi Arabia, and Al-Qaeda and its Allies

New York Times and Washington Post bestselling author Michael Scheuer is the former head of the CIA’s Bin Laden Unit, where he also ran the Rendition Program. He resigned from CIA in November 2004 after nearly two decades of experience in covert action and national security issues related to Afghanistan, South Asia, and the Middle East. He is the author of the new book, Marching Toward Hell: America and Islam After Iraq (Free Press, 2008). He also wrote Imperial Hubris: Why the West is Losing the War on Terrorism (Potomac Books, 2004), and Through Our Enemies’ Eyes: Osama bin Laden, Radical Islam, and the Future of America (Potomac Books, 2002). His biography, Osama bin Laden, was published in February, 2011 by Oxford University Press.

Scheuer’s writings also have appeared in the Atlantic, Washington Times, Los Angeles Times, San Francisco Chronicle, Antiwar.com, New York Times, American Conservative, Dallas Morning News, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, India Today, Washington Post, Non-Intervention.com, the National Interest, and the American Interest. Scheuer has been featured on such national television news programs as Meet the Press, Glen Beck, Nightline, 60 Minutes, the O’Reilly Factor, and the News Hour with Jim Lehrer, as well as on international television news programs in Britain, Australia, France, Spain, Japan, Italy, Greece, the Netherlands, China, and Germany. He has been interviewed for broadcast media and documentaries — including Frontline, the History Channel, the BBC, the Discovery Channel, National Geographic, and PBS — and has been the focus of print media worldwide.

Scheuer holds a B.A., two M.A.’s, and a Ph. D. He is an Adjunct Professor of Security Studies at Georgetown University.

Please direct inquiries to Jennifer Jefferis (jljefferis@gmail.com)

Secretary of Homeland Security Speech - Oct 20th 2011

I am happy to announce that the Secretary of Homeland Security, Janet Napolitano, will be speaking at the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University on October 20, 2011.
The 5:30 p.m. event in Sanford’s Fleishman Commons is free and open to the public, and is part of the school’s Terry Sanford Distinguished Lecture series, which brings notable leaders to speak on Duke’s campus. Visitors should park in the Science Drive Visitor’s lot.
Congressman David Price will introduce Secretary Napolitano at the event, which will be a summation of the Secretary’s University Lecture Series and will cover a broad range of topics. Triangle Center Director, David Schanzer, and the Director of the Kenan Institute for Ethics, Noah Pickus, will moderate the conversation with Secretary Napolitano.
The event will also be streamed live on Duke’s Ustream channel, http://www.ustream.tv/dukeuniversity.
This event is co-sponsored by the Triangle Center on Terrorism and Homeland Security and the Duke Program on American Grand Strategy.
All press-related questions should be directed to Karen Kemp (Karen.kemp@duke.edu). All general event questions should be directed to Mary Lindsley (mary.lindsley@duke.edu).

Complete Continence is Wholly Possible”: The Regulation of Sexuality by the US Army in France and Germany 1917-23 - Oct 14th 2011

Research Triangle Seminar Series on the History of Military, War and Society

invites you to attend

Friday, 14 October 2011

4:00 – 6:00 p.m. – Duke University
East Campus, Carr Building, 114 Campus Drive , Room 229

Andrew Byers (Duke University)

“Complete Continence Is Wholly Possible”: The Regulation of Sexuality by the
U.S. Army in France and Germany, 1917-23

The U.S. Army’s campaign against venereal disease during World War I and the
post-war occupation of Germany represented massive, new intrusions by the
American state into the sexual lives of U.S. soldiers and their French and
German sexual partners. The bodies of soldiers and prostitutes were routinely
inspected and, if found to be diseased, both were forcibly incarcerated and
medically treated by army physicians and colluding civil authorities in France
and Germany. This paper will explore the role of the state in shaping the
sexual lives of individuals through the institution of a regime of sexual
surveillance and policing. Byers argues that these efforts to regulate the
sexual behaviors of soldiers and their sexual partners were part of a much
larger “sexual economy of war” that encompassed all aspects of soldiers’
intimate lives.

ANDREW BYERS received his B.A. in History and Political Science from Virginia
Tech in 1994 and his M.A. in National Security Studies from Georgetown
University in 1996. He then worked in defense for ten years before returning to
graduate school at Duke University in 2006.

The seminar starts at 4:15 pm. Refreshments will be served before the seminar.

HMWS Seminar: The Regulation of Sexuality by the US Army in France and Germany - Oct 15th 2011

“Complete Continence Is Wholly Possible”:
The Regulation of Sexuality by the U.S. Army in France and Germany, 1917-23

The U.S. Army’s campaign against venereal disease during World War I and the post-war occupation of Germany represented massive, new intrusions by the American state into the sexual lives of U.S. soldiers and their French and German sexual partners. The bodies of soldiers and prostitutes were routinely inspected and, if found to be diseased, both were forcibly incarcerated and medically treated by army physicians and colluding civil authorities in France and Germany. This paper will explore the role of the state in shaping the sexual lives of individuals through the institution of a regime of sexual surveillance and policing. Byers argues that these efforts to regulate the sexual behaviors of soldiers and their sexual partners were part of a much larger “sexual economy of war” that encompassed all aspects of soldiers’ intimate lives.

ANDREW BYERS received his B.A. in History and Political Science from Virginia Tech in 1994 and his M.A. in National Security Studies from Georgetown University in 1996. He then worked in defense for ten years before returning to graduate school at Duke University in 2006.

The seminar starts at 4:15 pm. Refreshments will be served before the seminar.
A pre-circulated paper is available one week in advance at: fbruehoe@email.unc.edu

For more information see the website: http://www.unc.edu/mhss/

Co-sponsored by the Triangle Institute for Security Studies

The ORGANIZERS of the “History of the Military, War and Society Seminar” in the academic year 2011-12 are:

Dirk Bonker (Duke University)
Karen Hagemann (UNC at Chapel Hill)
Susanna Michele Lee (NC State University)

in cooperation with

Friederike Bruehoefener (UNC at Chapel Hill)
Andrew Byers (Duke University)
Joseph Glatthaar (UNC at Chapel Hill)
Richard Kohn (UNC at Chapel Hill)
Anna Krylova (Duke University)
Wayne Lee (UNC at Chapel Hill)
Alex Roland (Duke University)

Susanna Michele Lee
Assistant Professor
Department of History
North Carolina State University
Campus Box 8108
Raleigh, NC 27695-8108
Email: susanna_lee@ncsu.edu
Office: Withers 260
Phone: 919-513-2215

The Arab Spring: Hopes for Democracy in Libya and Egypt - Oct 07th 2011

The first speaker of the fall semester series, Dr. Andrew Reynolds, will discuss the critical developments in and potential hopes for the uprisings that have shaken not only the Arab world, but the entire globe.

Andrew Reynolds is the author of Designing Democracy in a Dangerous World (Oxford, 2011). In June and September of this year, he was an adviser on constitutional design issues in Egypt and Libya. Reynolds is an associate professor in the department of Political Science at UNC and chair of the curriculum in Global Studies.

The series will continue to explore the hopes and desperation of conflict with an expert on the civil wars of Central America Dr. Sandy Smith-Nonini on October 19th in Room 1009 of the FedEx Global Education Center. Alexandra Fuller, the bestselling author of memoirs from her childhood in war-torn central Africa, will conclude the program on November 8th in the Nelson Mandela Auditorium of the FedEx Global Education Center.

The Foreign Policy of the Department of Homeland Security - Oct 05th 2011

Dr. Chris Sands, Senior Fellow, the Hudson Institute, explains how DHS has built a powerful web of foreign connections in its short life.

Conference on Fragile States, Global Consequences - Oct 05th 2011

Schedule: 5:30 – 6:00 pm Reception with light refreshments in the FedEx Global Education
Center’s atrium lobby
6:00 – 6:45 pm Welcome and video, Fragile States, Global Consequences, produced
by the Stanley Foundation. In the Global Education Center’s Mandela Auditorium.
6:45 – 7:00 pm Discussion groups formed and led by leaders to breakout rooms in the
Global Education Center
7:00 – 7:30 pm Group discussions of the video, based on Discussion Guide questions.
7:30 – 7:45 pm Discussion groups re-assemble in Auditorium
7:45 – 8:00 pm Discussion groups share their thoughts, facilitated by Robert M.
Jenkins, Ph.D. Director of the Center for Slavic, Eurasian,
and East European Studies, UNC-CH.

For over a century the balance of power among the world’s strongest nations was the dominant issue in discussions of global security. Many of today’s policies and international institutions were created to deal with conflicts between the major powers.

But today fragile states, such as the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Bosnia, East Timor, and Haiti, are emerging as the most serious threat to global security. These countries straddle the thin line between survival and chaos, suffering from weak governments, internal conflict, ethnic conflict, poverty and sometimes all of these. Fragile states’ weaknesses often permit extremist groups to thrive within their borders, create breeding grounds for disease pandemics, stimulate mass migrations, and offer safe havens for drugs or arms traders and for human traffickers.

This Conference will examine the global challenge of fragile states. It aims to encourage discussion of ways to promote stronger nations and deal more effectively with those that are already on the brink of failure.

US Treasury Official to Speak about Trouble Asset Relief Program - Oct 03rd 2011

CONTACT: Kevin Anselmo
(919) 660-7722 (o); (919) 450-7035 (c)
kevin.anselmo@duke.edu

U.S. TREASURY OFFICIAL TO SPEAK ABOUT TROUBLE ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM (TARP) AT DUKE OCT. 3

Note to editors: Massad will be available to speak with media before the event. Please contact Kevin Anselmo in advance to make arrangements.

DURHAM, N.C. — Timothy G. Massad, the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s assistant secretary for financial stability, will address the state of the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) on Oct. 3 at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business.

The presentation, free and open to the public, will run from 5:15 – 6:15 p.m. at Fuqua’s Geneen Auditorium.

In his role with the Department of the Treasury, Massad is responsible for overseeing the implementation and wind down of TARP. The date of his presentation at Duke coincides with the three-year anniversary of TARP, which was introduced by President George W. Bush on Oct. 3, 2008, in response to the subprime mortgage crisis.

The program essentially has allowed the U.S. government to purchase assets and equity from financial institutions to strengthen the financial sector. Massad’s presentation will address the rationale for implementing TARP as well as its current status and structure.

Massad, a graduate of Harvard Law School, joined the Treasury Department in May 2009 as chief counsel for the TARP after serving as special legal adviser to the congressional oversight panel for economic stabilization. He became acting assistant secretary and was confirmed by the Senate as assistant secretary in June.

The event is sponsored by Fuqua’s Center for Financial Excellence, The Sanford School of Public Policy, the Duke Law School and Duke’s Department of Economics.

The Great Pretend Game–Realities on the Ground in Afghanistan - Oct 02nd 2011

“The Great Pretend Game—Realities on the Ground in Afghanistan” featuring international humanitarian journalist and author, Edward Girardet.

2 November 2011

4:00-5:30pm

Rhodes Conference Room, Sanford 223, Sanford school of Public Policy, Duke University

Edward Girardet, journalist and author of the recently-published book “Killing the Cranes: A Reporter’s Journey Through Three Decades of War in Afghanistan,” will speak on his experiences reporting from Afghanistan and will discuss the role of media in addressing ongoing humanitarian situations.

Girardet has been reporting on turmoil in Afghanistan since 1979, serving as a foreign correspondent for news agencies such as The Christian Science Monitor and U.S. News and World Report. He has written articles for National Geographic and helped produce documentary segments on a number of politically-urgent situations in Africa, Asia, and beyond, often working out of dangerous conflict zones.Girardet is also a founding director of the Institute for Media and Global Governance in Geneva, Switzerland, and editor of the UK-based Crosslines Essential Media Ltd.

For more information about Edward Girardet, please visit: www.chelseagreen.com/authors/edward_girardet.

US-Iraq Relations: A Turning Point. Samir Sumaida’ie Ambassador of Iraq in the US - Sep 30th 2011

Lunch and Learn: Millenium Development Goals and Environment - Sep 29th 2011

Promulgated in 2000 at an extraordinary meeting of the UN General Assembly, the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) are, collectively, a global development strategy that guides all governments, the United Nations and non-governmental development agencies’ efforts to combat global poverty and hunger. Its eight goals – reducing income poverty, hunger, disease, lack of adequate shelter and exclusion — while promoting gender equality, health, education and environmental sustainability, aim at lifting the world’s poorest people from abject poverty. While some progress has been made, much remains to be done by the Goals’ target date of 2015.

Professor Norm Christensen, founding Dean, and research professor, at Duke University’s Nichols School of the Environment, will discuss “Meeting the United Nations Millennium Development Goals in a Changing Environment” at our Lunch and Learn meeting on Wednesday, September 28, from Noon-2PM at the Carolina Meadows retirement community in Chapel Hill. Reservations should be made by $18 check to UNAUSA West Triangle Chapter and sent to Warren Glick, 83203 Jarvis, Chapel Hill, NC 27517, by September 23. Details www.una-westtriangle.org.

West Triangle Chapter of the United Nations Association
UNA.west.triangle@gmail.com
http://www.una-westtriangle.org/

Read our blog at http://una-westtriangle.blogspot.com/
Follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/UNAwesttriangle
Friend us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/unawesttriangle

Chinese Military Capabilities - Sep 28th 2011

Gender, Military and War in Modern History Series - Sep 16th 2011

“Gender, Military and War in Modern History Series”
a co-operation of the UNC Series on “Gender, Politics and Culture in Europe and Beyond” and the “Research Triangle Seminar Series on the History of Military, War and Society”

Friday, 16 September 2011

4:00 – 6:00 pm – Duke University
East Campus, Carr Building, 114 Campus Drive , Room 229
STEFAN DUDINK (Radboud University, Nijmegen)
RESTORATION IN UNIFORM:
MASCULINITY AND MONARCHICAL REPRESENTATION IN POST-REVOLUTIONARY EUROPE, 1813-1819

The making of kings in Restoration Europe required strenuous and elaborate work in the realms of ritual and representation. This was the case for all European societies in which monarchy had lost its status as the self-evident and given political form, but in particular in the Netherlands where it had never possessed this status in the first place. This lecture explores the role of masculinity in the visual representations of the making of the Dutch monarchy. It will concentrate on the ways in which the representation of the king as a man in uniform became central to the staging of a new monarchy in a post-revolutionary age.

STEFAN DUDINK teaches at the Institute for Gender Studies of Radboud University Nijmegen. Within the wider field of the history of gender and sexuality in modern Western political culture, his research concentrates on masculinity and sexuality. He has published a study on Dutch, late nineteenth-century liberalism (1997), and is co-editor with K. Hagemann and J. Tosh of Masculinities in Politics and War: Gendering Modern History (2004) and with K. Hagemann and A. Clark of Representing Masculinity: Male Citizenship in Modern Western Culture (2007).
The seminar starts at 4:15 pm. Refreshments will be served before the seminar.

For more information see the website: http://www.unc.edu/mhss/.
Co-sponsored by the Triangle Institute for Security Studies

The ORGANIZERS of the “History of the Military, War and Society Seminar” in the academic year 2011-12 are:

Dirk Bonker (Duke University)
Karen Hagemann (UNC at Chapel Hill)
Susanna Michele Lee (NC State University)

in cooperation with

Friederike Bruehoefener (UNC at Chapel Hill)
Andrew Byers (Duke University)
Joseph Glatthaar (UNC at Chapel Hill)
Richard Kohn (UNC at Chapel Hill)
Anna Krylova (Duke University)
Wayne Lee (UNC at Chapel Hill)
Alex Roland (Duke University)

National Security, Energy and Climate (RSVP!) - Sep 15th 2011

Please join the Pew Project on National Security, Energy and Climate, CNA and local North Carolina partners for a discussion on the critical links between clean energy and national security with:

Former U.S. Senator John Warner (R-VA)

Senior Policy Adviser to the Pew Project on National Security, Energy and Climate

Admiral John Nathman, USN (Ret.)

CNA Military Advisory Board Member

Tim Profeta

Director, Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions at Duke University

Vikram Rao

Executive Director, Research Triangle Energy Consortium

Ivan Urlaub,

Executive Director, NC Sustainable Energy Association

A reception with refreshments and hors d’oeuvres will immediately follow the forum.

Please RSVP to JSulham@NexusStrategies.com.

Practicing Cinema in a Palestinian Context: A Conversation with Filmmaker Annemarie Jacir - Sep 15th 2011

Jacir is the Amman-based director of Salt of This
Sea, Like Twenty Impossibles, The Satellite Shooters,
and A Post-Oslo History. She is currently completing
her second feature film, When I Saw You.
Her work has screened at festivals around the world
and garnered numerous awards.

Jacir will discuss her own film practice, her artistic
choices, the challenges she has faced, and show
clips from her work.

On Sept. 15 at 8 pm Jacir will be present for the screening of her feature film Salt of This Sea at the White Auditorium on Duke’s East Campus.

Communicating Through Chaos - Sep 14th 2011

Event Details:
7 -9 pm
Tuesday Sept. 13th, Memorial Hall
Tickets are free at the Memorial Box Office, two tickets per one card.

http://studentorgs.unc.edu/speakers/index.php/about-us/robert-gibbs-comes-to-unc

“Communicating Through the Chaos”

Any seasoned communications professional understands the complexities of delivering clear strategic messages in the middle of a maelstrom. As White House Press Secretary for President Obama, Robert Gibbs is a master of communicating in a chaotic environment and under international scrutiny for every nuance of his message. A White House Press Secretary deals with an extraordinarily high volume of big events at once and Robert Gibbs managed to win the trust of the President, the Press and the American public through it all.

The Eve Marie Carson Lecture Series was created in memory of past Student Body President Eve Carson. Eve believed that students should have a voice in the leaders who come to our campus and that play a role in shaping the conversations we have.Focused on sparking conversation and providing insight into the relevant issues of today, The Eve Marie Carson Lecture Series strives to bring people who are masters at what they do and are leading figures in their field.

Ten Years Later: The Impact on Muslims at Home and Abroad - Sep 13th 2011

By Alif Alikhan, Assistant Secretary for Policy Development at the Department of Homeland Security. Professor, National Defense University.
Panel Discussion with UNC and Duke Faculty to Follow.

The Impact of 9/11 on the US National Security Establishment - Sep 12th 2011

Panel Discussion

Did 9/11 Change Anything? Everything - Sep 09th 2011

Symposium: Duke University

Esse Quam Videri: Muslim Self Portraits - Sep 08th 2011

Photo Exhibit by Todd Drake.

Critical Links between Clean Energy Innovation and National Security - Aug 16th 2011

A reception with refreshments and hors d’oeuvres will immediately follow the forum

Former US Senator John Warner, (Senior policy adviser to the Pew Project on National Security, Energy and Climate)

Admiral John Nathan, USN (CNA Military Advisory Board Member)

Tim Profeta (Director, Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy)

Vikram Rao (Ex Director, Research Triangle Energy Consortium)

Ivan Urlaub (Ex Director, NC Sustainable Energy Association)

Sanctions and Nonproliferation - Apr 19th 2011

Mohammad Ayatollahi Tabaar

Dept of Sociology and Anthropology Seminar: John Hagan - Apr 15th 2011

John Hagan is John D. MacArthur Professor of Sociology and Law at Northwestern University and Co-Director of the Center on Law and Globalization at the American Bar Foundation in Chicago. He received the Stockholm Prize in Criminology in 2009.
He is the recent co-author of “Death in Darfur” in Science, “Racial Targeting of Sexual Violence in Darfur” in the American Journal of Public Health, and of “The Collective Dynamics of Racial Dehumanization and Genocidal Victimization” in the American Sociological Review.

A paper with Gabrielle Ferrales and Guillermina Jasso on “How Law Rules: Torture, Terror and the Normative Judgments of Iraqi Judges” received the 2009 Best Article Prize from the Law and Society Association.
Professor Hagan will discuss these important issues on the NCSU campus on Friday, April 15. All interested persons are invited to attend.

Countdown to Zero: The Dialectic - Apr 13th 2011

Patrick Cottrell, Political Science, University of Wisconsin

Gender and Human Rights - Apr 13th 2011

Jean H. Quataert, Binghamton University

Honor Student Presentations - Apr 12th 2011

Dinner

Imagining Peace - Apr 09th 2011

The co-directors and Rotary Peace Fellows of the Duke-UNC Rotary Center for International Studies in peace and conflict resolution have the honor of inviting you to the 8th Annual Rotary Fellows Spring Conference.

Please RSVP online at www.RotaryPeaceCenterNC.org
by April 1, 2011
919-843-4887

Global Governance/Multilateralism - Apr 05th 2011

Dr. Michael Munger

Holocaust in Eastern Europe: Race, Gender, and Property - Apr 01st 2011

HMWS Series

Military Labor in latin America and the Caribbean Conference - Apr 03rd 2011

Middle East Policy Update - Apr 01st 2011

Major General James “Mike” M. Holmes
Refreshments will be served beginning 6:45.

Ending America’s Wars - Mar 30th 2011

In addition to presentations by UNC faculty Dr. Joe Glatthaar and Dr. Wayne Lee, we have invited two distinguished scholars on the American military past, Dr. Roger Spiller and Dr. Andrew Bacevich. Dr. Richard Kohn of UNC will moderate.

Dr. Spiller was a founding member and long-time professor of the U.S. Army’s Combat Studies Institute, was Special Assistant to the CinC, U.S. Army Readiness Command and later the Personal Historian to the Army Chief of Staff. He has authored numerous books including An Instinct for War (2005) and In the School of War (2010).

Dr. Bacevich is a former army officer and now professor of history and International Relations at Boston University. Well known as a pungent analyst of American militarism and foreign policy adventurism, among other books, he has published The New American Militarism: How Americans are Seduced by War (2005), The Limits of Power: The End of American Exceptionalism (2008), and most recently, Washington Rules: America’s Path to Permanent War (2010).

After the panel presents short papers on various problems relating to the history of American war termination, there will be comments from two Army Special Forces officers, COL Tom Rogers and COL Kevin Colyer, who are here at UNC this year as the inaugural “National Security Fellows.” They will provide a their take on how the problem of ending a war affects the way one fights it.

Spark Change From Within (Rye Barcott) - Mar 30th 2011

Free to the public, book signing following.
The 2010-2011 Hillard Gold ’39 Lecture

Founder of Carolina for Kibera. Will be discussing the path to peace.

THe Caucasus - Mar 29th 2011

Thomas de Waal

PWAD Dinner - Mar 26th 2011

Germany Ascendant - Mar 15th 2011

Dr. Christiane Lermke

The Energy and Security Nexus: A Strategic Dilemma - Mar 05th 2011

The most recent United States Security Strategy emphasizes that we must transform
the way we use energy if we are to stave off one set of security problems – those
that stem from a fragile economy and the onset of climate change, and those that
derive from energy dependency. However, the pursuit of alternative energy can create
a different set of security problems. The diversion of food for fuel may undermine
human security and international order; the development of hydroelectric power and
bio-fuels threatens to increase competition for water; the pursuit of nuclear energy
may lead to nuclear proliferation. And while the U.S. military can (and is) experimenting
with wind and sun technologies, these are scarcely going to eliminate its
fossil fuel needs in the near future. The purpose of this conference will be to bring
together security and technolgoy experts and invite them to explore the relative
security risks and benefi ts that are likely to ensue from the pursuit of different types
of energy.

Keynote Address
• Panel I: Fossil Fuels – Can’t
Live With Them, Can’t live
Without Them
• Panels II and III: Alternative
Energy: Pros and Cons from a
Security Perspective
• Panel IV: The International
Context
• Panel V: Solutions

Responding to the Financial Crisis - Mar 02nd 2011

Dr. Jeffrey Sachs, Dr. Timothy Mckeown

Jim Steinberg, Deputy of Secretary of State - Mar 01st 2011

War and Culture in Northern Europe - Feb 25th 2011

HMWS Series: Margaret Humphreys, History and Medicine, Duke University

Horn of Africa - Feb 23rd 2011

Dr. Ahmed I. Samatar

Al-Qaida and Other Emerging Threats in Yemen- What can/should the US do? - Feb 16th 2011

Ambassador Edmund Hull, Former Ambassador to Yemen

Failure Analysis and Nuclear Security - Feb 11th 2011

Henry Petroski, History and Engineering, Duke University

US National Security - Feb 09th 2011

Lt. Gen. John R. Mulholland Jr

US National Security - Feb 09th 2011

Film as Non-Violent Protest - Feb 04th 2011

Come meet Kamal Aljafari, a Palestinian filmmaker who has won numerous awards for his work.

Reporting on the Obama White House 2.0 - Feb 04th 2011

Peter Baker, White House Correspondent for the New York Times

War Stories: Jon Lee Anderson - Feb 03rd 2011

The Curriculum in Global Studies is pleased to present War Stories, a semester-long Global Studies speaker series. The first speaker is Jon Lee Anderson, one of the leading foreign correspondents of our time. Over the last decade he has reported frequently from Iraq and covered the conflicts in Afghanistan, Angola, Lebanon and elsewhere for The New Yorker.

His desire to understand and tell contemporary stories of our world has led him to report from countless warzones, including Afghanistan, Iraq, Somalia, Liberia, El Salvador and Venezuela, where he has profiled with incredible intelligence and empathy the civilians whose lives had been destroyed by conflict, the active soldiers fighting these wars, and the regions’ leading political figures, such as Fidel Castro, Hamid Karzai, Augusto Pinochet and Hugo Chavez. Anderson is also the author of four well-received non-fiction works, including the best-selling and definitive biography of Che Guevara, Che Guevara: A Revolutionary Life, first published in 1997.

Rebuilding Haiti - Feb 02nd 2011

Dr. Laurent Dubois

African Soldiers in the Colonial Army of German East Africa - Jan 28th 2011

HMWS Series: Michelle Moyd, History, Indiana

Council On Foreign Relations - Jan 26th 2011

Charles Kupchan

Nuclear Arms Control and Domestic Politics - Jan 21st 2011

Sean Giovanello, Political Science, Elon University

Muslim Engagement and US Foreign Policy in the 21st Century - Jan 18th 2011

Farah Pandith, Senior Advisor on Muslim Engagement, US Department of State

The Crossing - Dec 09th 2010

Watch the movie “The Crossing” with introduction and Q&A with Dr. Lee! You might want to get there a little early to make sure you get a seat.

Shireen Hunter; The Perils of Using Islam as an Instrument of Foreign Policy - Dec 02nd 2010

11:30 am
Lunches will be provided
Contact Jenny Boyle for more info

2010 Zeidman Colloquium: Panel Discussion on Media Coverage of the 2010 Mid-Term Elections - Nov 20th 2010

Philip Bennett, the Eugene C. Patterson Professor of the Practice of Journalism and Public Policy, will moderate.
The panelists are:
John F. Harris, a Editor-in-Chief of Politico
Sunshine Hillygus, associate professor of Political Science at Duke University, and an expert on elections and media polling
John King, CNN’s chief national correspondent
Sponsored by the DeWitt Wallace Center for Media and Democracy

Dr. Edelman Lunch, time TBD - Nov 20th 2010

http://www.rightweb.irc-online.org/profile/Edelman_Eric

Dave Johnson, Future of Warfare (Evening, time TBD) - Nov 12th 2010

http://www.rand.org/about/people/j/johnson_david_e.html

Contact Carolyn Pumphrey for more info

David Brooks, “Politics and Culture in the Age of Obama” - Nov 10th 2010

New York Times columnist David Brooks discusses politics and the culture wars during the Obama presidency. Brooks is a political pundit and a regular guest on the PBS NewsHour. This is a Terry Sanford Distinguished Lecture and part of the “Gridlock: Can Our System Tackle America’s Big Problems” series. There will be a reception to follow.

Sponsored by the Sanford School of Public Policy

Islam, American Values, and the ‘War on Terror’: A Legal Perspective. - Nov 04th 2010

Nick Spicer, Al-Jazeera English, “Islam in the News” - Nov 01st 2010

Part of the Islam in the News Events Series. Sponsored by the Duke Islamic Studies Center with the DeWitt Wallace Center for Media and Democracy, and the Fall 2010 Muslim Cultures Focus Cluster.

Military History Seminar - Oct 30th 2010

http://www.sanford.duke.edu/centers/tiss/documents/HMWS-Flyer-Glymph-fall-10-2010.pdf

Contact Caroline Pumphrey for additional info

Bob Woodward - Oct 27th 2010

Business Casual Attire, Contact Jenny Boyle for more info
http://bobwoodward.com/

Reporting from the Dark Side - Oct 25th 2010

Pakistan’s Double Jeopardy: Costs of Insurgency and Super Floods - Oct 21st 2010

AGIS/TISS Wickersham’s Career Night - Oct 20th 2010

Contact Jenny Boyle for more info

Robert Patman @ Hamilton 569 - Oct 18th 2010

Kevin Gates (Brown bag lunch) Hamilton 569 - Oct 18th 2010

Stephen Flynn in Global Ed Center - Oct 06th 2010

Stephen Flynn Lunch - Oct 06th 2010

RSVP required

Krasno Series Presents: Lt. General Daniel Bolger, Why We Lost the Wars in Afghanistan and Iraq: the U.S. and the Global War on Terrorism - Mar 17th 2015

UNC-TISS National Security Fellows Keynote - Mar 17th 2015

UNC-TISS National Security Fellows End-of-Year Conference - Mar 17th 2015

Krasno Series Ambassadors’ Forum Presents: President Mikhail Saakashvili, former President of the Republic of Georgia - Mar 03rd 2015

Iran Reading Group - Feb 27th 2015

Krasno Series Presents: Dr. Federiga Bindi, The End of U.S. Global Leadership? - Feb 24th 2015

IC Virtual Fair (sign up at http://icvirtualfair.com/) - Feb 20th 2015

Krasno Ambassadors’ Forum Presents: Sergey Ivanovich Kislyak, the Ambassador of the Russian Federation to the United States, Russia’s Role in World Affairs - Feb 18th 2015

Live-stream of LTG Mike Flynn (former DIA director) event at Duke - Feb 11th 2015

General Dempsey, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Guest Lecture - Feb 06th 2015

General Dempsey: 2011 Ambassador S. Davis Phillips Family International Lecture - Jan 13th 2012

GEN. MARTIN DEMPSEY, CHAIRMAN OF THE JOINT CHIEFS OF STAFF, TO SPEAK AT DUKE JAN. 12

GEN Martin E. Dempsey, the chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, will speak at Duke University on Jan. 12.

Dempsey will deliver the 2011 Ambassador S. Davis Phillips Family International Lecture at 5:30 p.m. in Page Auditorium.

The event is free and open to the public, but tickets are required, with a limit of two per person. Tickets can be obtained through the Duke Box Office at (919) 684-4444 or at tickets.duke.edu starting at 11 a.m. Tuesday, Dec. 13 for students, 2 p.m. for the general public. Tickets purchased online include a $6 handling fee.
Those unable to attend can watch a live webcast at ustream.tv/dukeuniversity.

Dempsey is the nation’s highest-ranking military officer, serving as adviser to the president, secretary of defense and the National Security Council. During his 37 years in the U.S. Army, he has served during times of war and peace at every level, from platoon leader to combatant commander.

Both a soldier and a scholar, he earned a master’s degree in English from Duke in 1984.

He’s held commands in both Iraq and Afghanistan as well as other posts in the Middle East and Europe. In 2007, Dempsey served as acting commander of U.S. Central Command and became chief of staff of the Army earlier this year.

His awards and decorations include the Defense Distinguished Service Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster, the Distinguished Service Medal with three Oak Leaf Clusters and the Defense Superior Service Medal.

The Duke event is sponsored by the Duke Program in American Grand Strategy and co-sponsored by the Triangle Institute for Security Studies, the Sanford School of Public Policy and the Office of Global Strategy and Programs.

For more information, visit the Triangle Institute for Security Studies website, http://sanford.duke.edu/centers/tiss.

Cheers,
Jenny Boyle

The United States & Homeland Security - Apr 06th 2015

North Carolina Central University

“The United States & Homeland Security”

CONGRESSMAN DAVID PRICE

Fourth District, U.S. House of Representatives

Representative David Price serves on the House Appropriations Committee and is a member of the Appropriations Subcommittees covering homeland security, military construction, and veterans affairs. A recognized leader in foreign policy, he co-chairs the House Democracy Partnership for strengthening parliaments in emerging democracies.

Prior to beginning his service in the U.S. Congress in 1987, Dr. Price was a Professor of Political Science and Public Policy at Duke University. He received his Ph.D. in political science from Yale University (1969). Earlier, he earned his Bachelor of Divinity from Yale (1964) and B.A. from UNC-CH (1961), where he was a Morehead Scholar. Dr. Price is the author of four books on U.S. Congress and the American political system.

Monday, April 6, 2015

1:00 PM – 2:00 PM

202 BBRI

(The Auditorium, Biomedical/Biotechnology Research Institute)

 

Co-sponsored by the Global Security Program (GSP) at North Carolina Central University & the Triangle Institute for Security Studies Intelligence Community Center for Academic Excellence (TISS-IC-CAE) in Intelligence and Security.

Security Challenges in the Middle East - Apr 13th 2015

North Carolina Central University

 

“Security Challenges in the Middle East”

 

Da’ish (Islamic State          Iranian nuclear Program

Of Iraq and the Levant)

 

TONY RIVERA, Ph.D.                   ROBERT REARDON, Ph.D.

Professor, National Defense U.        Assistant Professor, NC State U.

 

Professor Rivera received his Ph.D. in Political Science and International Relations from the University of Delaware. He has served as Managing Editor of International Studies Compendium and Assistant Editor of ReOrient.

 

Professor Reardon received his Ph.D. from MIT and competed post-doctoral research fellowship with the International Security Program and the Project on Managing the Atom at Harvard University’s Belfar Center for Science and International Affairs. His publications include Containing Iran (RAND Corporation).

 

Monday, April 13, 2015

6:00 PM – 7:45 PM

202 BBRI

(The Auditorium, Biomedical/Biotechnology Research Institute)

 

Co-sponsored by the Global Security Program (GSP) at North Carolina Central University & the Triangle Institute for Security Studies Intelligence Community Center for Academic Excellence (TISS-IC-CAE) in Intelligence and Security.

Warning and All-Source Intelligence – India-Pakistan (Colloquium and Simulation) - Apr 12th 2015

http://tissiccae.web.unc.edu/event/warning-and-all-source-intelligence-india-pakistan-colloquium-and-simulation/

DEADLINE FOR PWAD NEWSLETTER SUBMISSIONS - Apr 01st 2015

Simulation – Crisis Negotiations (Cyprus) - Oct 04th 2015

2015 International Strategic Crisis Negotiations Exercise– Cyprus

2015 International Strategic Crisis Negotiations Exercise (Cyprus)

REGISTRATION REQUIRED!! Register HERE by September 27, 2015.

Date: October 2-3, 2015

Location: UNC-Chapel Hill

Individual students, professors, or student groups from UNC-Chapel Hill, Duke University, North Carolina State University, North Carolina Central University, or the National Defense University (CISA) campus at Fort Bragg, NC, should contact Jennifer Akin (Jennifer.akin@duke.edu) for more information.

Exercise Overview: Cyprus

Time Frame: One year in the future

Teams (7): Republic of Cyprus, Turkish Cypriot Community, Greece, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States, and European Union

Setting (Lead/Host Representative): UN sponsored peace talks, UN Headquarters, New York City (UN Special Advisor on Cyprus)

This scenario closely mirrors the real world situation and ongoing negotiation process between the two Cypriot communities. However, it also involves sponsor nations (Greece and Turkey), a treaty nation (UK), an international organization (EU) of which the Republic of Cyprus is a member, and a superpower (U.S.). Issues follow the current chapter process, but employ a UN-developed and adopted Aide Memoir to both develop the scope of the problem and negotiation format (7 chapters over the course of one year), and to limit the issues dealt with (3 chapters, plus confidence -building measures) during the exercise.

The issues that participants will deal with involve: (1) Governance and Power Sharing, (2) Security and Guarantees, and (3) Population. Confidence-building measures, that have the potential to move the negotiations forward if addressed, separately involve both Cypriot communities and issues between Greece and Turkey.

ISCNE & TISS IC Student Scholar Program

For those undergraduate and graduate students at UNC-CH, Duke, NCSU, or NCCU pursuing the Student Scholar distinction associated with the TISS Intelligence Community Center of Academic Excellence, the ISCNE will count toward the experiential education requirements.

Duke LENS Conference (Annual) - Feb 28th 2016

Duke Law’s Center on Law, Ethics and National Security (LENS) annual conference. This year’s – the 22nd – is set for Friday, February 26th and Saturday morning, February 27th here at Duke Law School. 

 

Although the conference is law-centric, those of you who have attended in the past know that the audience is 40-50% non-lawyer (and the presenters typically gear their remarks accordingly).  Anyway, I think you’ll be pleased with the agenda (which is available online here: https://law.duke.edu/lens/conference/2016/ ). The theme this year is “Hybrid Threats = Hybrid Law?” (The question mark is deliberate!)  A very wide variety of topics will be addressed, including the impact of hybrid threats on the law of war, autonomous weapons, cyber activities, surveillance and privacy, civil-military relations, the private sector, ethics, and much more.

 

You’ll hear from Duke Law’s Professor Nita Farahany, as well as such luminaries from around campus as Dr. Missy Cummings, and Dr. Peter Feaver. Mr. Craig Silliman, Executive VP of Public Policy and General Counsel for Verizon (and son of Duke Law’s Hon. Scott Silliman), will keynote our Saturday session.

 

Among the top law professors participating is our keynoter, Professor Ken Anderson of American University Law and frequent Lawfare blogger, Professor Laura Donohue from Georgetown Law (recently announced as one of just five public advocates (amicus) at the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court), Professor Aurel Sari of the University of Exeter (UK) (who wrote a Lawfare post that centers on the conference theme (Legal Aspects of Hybrid War), and Professor Laurie Blank of Emory Law (who runs the International Humanitarian Law Clinic there).

 

We’ll also hear from Col Bryan Watson of the White House Military Office and Col Adam Oler of the National War College.  Moreover, Mr. Dave Graham from the U.S. Army’s Judge Advocate General’s School is coming, and we’ll welcome back Ms. Erin Wirtanen of the Central Intelligence Agency.  Prof Mike Schmitt of the Naval War College, the world’s foremost authority on cyber conflict, will bring us up to date on the much-anticipated Tallinn 2.0 manual.

I am very excited that my friend, Vice Admiral Jim Crawford, the Navy TJAG and former Legal Counsel to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, will be the guest speaker for our conference reception and dinner which will be held Friday, Feb. 26th at the Washington Duke Inn.

 

Along that line, just make sure we have a seat for all our guests, everyone must register.  That can be done through the conference website noted above, or directly here:  http://tinyurl.com/hul22fu.  If you or any of your folks would like to attend, I’d be very grateful if they registered soon as the conference fills up very quickly!

Michael Morgan (Human Rights) Faculty Dinner Seminar - Sep 10th 2015

Michael Morgan, UNC-Chapel Hill will speak on “To the Helsinki Station: Détente, Human Rights, and the Origins of the Helsinki Final Act” on the NCSU campus.  For more details, and to register, go to the seminar webpage.

Energy and Intelligence Simulation - Nov 07th 2015

REGISTRATION OPENED
The Annual TISS IC CAE Simulation (this year held separately from the conference) will take place on Friday November 6th – Saturday November 7th.  The Simulation will focus on Energy and Intelligence issues and will be held at the Hunt Library on the NCSU campus. Transportation to and from NCCU, Duke, and UNC will be provided.

Those participating will be expected to attend the entire event.  Pick up time on the Friday is currently planned for 3 PM with a preliminary session running from 4- 7 PM and then a return to the home campus.  Pick up time on Saturday will be at 9 AM, with the exercise running from 10 AM – 4 PM.

We are looking for advanced undergraduates (and master students) with some experience with simulations to help developing, organizing, and/or running the simulation.  Students who would like to assist in this fashion should write to Professors Caddell and  Boettcher (caddellj@email.unc.edu and william_boettcher@ncsu.edu) and they will work with you to find a suitable tasks.

The numbers of players will be capped at a little over 30 persons.  If interest is high, we will give priority to those participating in the Scholars Program and in particular to those Scholars in their senior year.

To register, click here: ENERGY AND INTELLIGENCE SIMULATION WEB PAGE

 
“Winter is Coming” 
Friday, November 6 from 4-7 p.m. (dinner provided)
Saturday, November 7 from 10-4 p.m. (lunch provided)
Details here:     2015ICCAESim Flyer

Bryan Fearey, Los Alamos – Nuclear Security, Science, and Policy - Sep 10th 2015

FeareyFlyer

LAS – Flagg Miller – - Sep 16th 2015

Miller Flyer

LAS – Etel Solingen, Nuclear Proliferation - Oct 22nd 2015

SolingenFlyer

Ethical Issues in Partnerships between Indigenous Peoples and Climate Science Organizations - Sep 23rd 2015

Our distinguished speaker: Kyle Powys Whyte (Potawatomi), The Timnick Chair in the Humanities, Dept of Philosophy, Michigan State University

Title: Ethical Issues in Partnerships between Indigenous Peoples and Climate Science Organizations

Date/Time: Wednesday, September 23, 4 pm in 101 David Clark Labs. A reception in the lobby will follow.

​Abstract:
Indigenous peoples are among the populations taking leadership on how best to address
climate change. While many Indigenous peoples have their own knowledge systems for
understanding how to respond to environmental change,
some are also turning to climate
and environmental sciences for additional tools and resources to support climate
adaptation planning. Yet there are many ethical issues, from colonialism to concerns about
the privacy of certain data, that can stand as barriers to effective partnerships between
Indigenous peoples and scientific organizations. This presentation will explore the
research and advocacy on these ethical issues and discuss recent strategies and best
practices in the North American context for how partnerships can be structured ethically
for the advancement of Indigenous and scientific goals.​Whyte Seminar Flyer

Krasno Distinguished Professorship “Winston S. Churchill & Peace Negotiations: Lessons for the 21st Century?” - Sep 10th 2015

The Richard M Krasno Distinguished Professorship @ UNC-Chapel Hill

                                                                      Prof. Klaus W. Larres

in co-operation with the Department of History & the Peace, War and Defense Curriculum (PWAD)

the College of Arts and Sciences, UNC Global, the Center for Global Initiatives, the Center for European Studies & the Triangle Institute for Security Studies (TISS).

Subscribe to our you tube channel: www.youtube.com/KrasnoUNC

 

“The U.S. in World Affairs: the Cold War and Beyond”
— lecture series with eminent scholars —


Schedule FALL 2015

Thursday, Sept. 10, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Prof. Klaus Larres (UNC Chapel Hill):
“Winston S. Churchill & Peace Negotiations:
Lessons for the 21st Century?”

Tuesday, Sept. 29, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Prof. Stephen Szabo (German Marshall Fund, Washington, DC):
“Germany confronts Russia:
Geo-Economics vs Geo-Politics?”

Thursday, October 8, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Prof. Jeffrey Herf (University of Maryland at College Park):
“War and Terror against Israel:
Germany (East & West), the U.S. and Israel
during the Cold War and the post-9/11 World”

Thursday, October 22, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Dr Malcolm Byrne (National Security Archive, Washington, DC):
“The U.S. and Iran – Lessons Learned?
Missed Opportunities from the 1953 Coup to a (Possible) Nuclear Deal”

Thursday, November 5, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library)
Prof. Nancy Mitchell (North Carolina State University):
“Jimmy Carter, the Cold War, Human Rights, and Africa”

Tuesday, November 10, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library)
Dr William Burr (National Security Archive, Washington, DC)
and Prof. Jeffrey Kimball (Miami University, Ohio):

“Nixon, Kissinger, the Madman Theory & the Vietnam War”

Tuesday, November 17, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Dr Peter Ruggenthaler (University of Graz, Austria):
“Russia, Europe, and the U.S.:
Cold War & Post-Cold War Security Conflicts from Stalin
to Gorbachev and Putin”

*** ALL WELCOME ***
Free parking after 5.00pm at Cobb Deck
All talks take place in the Pleasants Family Room of the Wilson Library (ground floor) from 5.30pm to 7.00pm

No RSVP necessary – but if you wish to reserve a seat, please email Alyssa Bowen “bowenal@live.unc.edu”

Krasno Distinguished Professorship “The U.S. and Iran – Lessons Learned? Missed Opportunities from the 1953 Coup to a (Possible) Nuclear Deal” - Oct 22nd 2015

The Richard M Krasno Distinguished Professorship @ UNC-Chapel Hill

                                                                      Prof. Klaus W. Larres

 

in co-operation with the Department of History & the Peace, War and Defense Curriculum (PWAD)

the College of Arts and Sciences, UNC Global, the Center for Global Initiatives, the Center for European Studies & the Triangle Institute for Security Studies (TISS).

Subscribe to our you tube channel: www.youtube.com/KrasnoUNC

 

“The U.S. in World Affairs: the Cold War and Beyond”
— lecture series with eminent scholars —

 


Schedule FALL 2015

Thursday, Sept. 10, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Prof. Klaus Larres (UNC Chapel Hill):
“Winston S. Churchill & Peace Negotiations:
Lessons for the 21st Century?”

Tuesday, Sept. 29, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Prof. Stephen Szabo (German Marshall Fund, Washington, DC):
“Germany confronts Russia:
Geo-Economics vs Geo-Politics?”

 

Thursday, October 8, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Prof. Jeffrey Herf (University of Maryland at College Park):
“War and Terror against Israel:
Germany (East & West), the U.S. and Israel
during the Cold War and the post-9/11 World”

 

Thursday, October 22, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Dr Malcolm Byrne (National Security Archive, Washington, DC):
“The U.S. and Iran – Lessons Learned?
Missed Opportunities from the 1953 Coup to a (Possible) Nuclear Deal”

 

Thursday, November 5, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library)
Prof. Nancy Mitchell (North Carolina State University):
“Jimmy Carter, the Cold War, Human Rights, and Africa”

 

Tuesday, November 10, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library)
Dr William Burr (National Security Archive, Washington, DC)
and Prof. Jeffrey Kimball (Miami University, Ohio):

“Nixon, Kissinger, the Madman Theory & the Vietnam War”

 

Tuesday, November 17, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Dr Peter Ruggenthaler (University of Graz, Austria):
“Russia, Europe, and the U.S.:
Cold War & Post-Cold War Security Conflicts from Stalin
to Gorbachev and Putin”

 

*** ALL WELCOME ***
Free parking after 5.00pm at Cobb Deck
All talks take place in the Pleasants Family Room of the Wilson Library (ground floor) from 5.30pm to 7.00pm

No RSVP necessary – but if you wish to reserve a seat, please email Alyssa Bowen “bowenal@live.unc.edu”

Krasno Distinguished Professorship “Germany confronts Russia: Geo-Economics vs Geo-Politics?” - Sep 29th 2015

The Richard M Krasno Distinguished Professorship @ UNC-Chapel Hill

                                                                      Prof. Klaus W. Larres

 

in co-operation with the Department of History & the Peace, War and Defense Curriculum (PWAD)

the College of Arts and Sciences, UNC Global, the Center for Global Initiatives, the Center for European Studies & the Triangle Institute for Security Studies (TISS).

Subscribe to our you tube channel: www.youtube.com/KrasnoUNC

 

“The U.S. in World Affairs: the Cold War and Beyond”
— lecture series with eminent scholars —

 


Schedule FALL 2015

Thursday, Sept. 10, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Prof. Klaus Larres (UNC Chapel Hill):
“Winston S. Churchill & Peace Negotiations:
Lessons for the 21st Century?”

Tuesday, Sept. 29, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Prof. Stephen Szabo (German Marshall Fund, Washington, DC):
“Germany confronts Russia:
Geo-Economics vs Geo-Politics?”

 

Thursday, October 8, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Prof. Jeffrey Herf (University of Maryland at College Park):
“War and Terror against Israel:
Germany (East & West), the U.S. and Israel
during the Cold War and the post-9/11 World”

 

Thursday, October 22, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Dr Malcolm Byrne (National Security Archive, Washington, DC):
“The U.S. and Iran – Lessons Learned?
Missed Opportunities from the 1953 Coup to a (Possible) Nuclear Deal”

 

Thursday, November 5, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library)
Prof. Nancy Mitchell (North Carolina State University):
“Jimmy Carter, the Cold War, Human Rights, and Africa”

 

Tuesday, November 10, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library)
Dr William Burr (National Security Archive, Washington, DC)
and Prof. Jeffrey Kimball (Miami University, Ohio):

“Nixon, Kissinger, the Madman Theory & the Vietnam War”

 

Tuesday, November 17, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Dr Peter Ruggenthaler (University of Graz, Austria):
“Russia, Europe, and the U.S.:
Cold War & Post-Cold War Security Conflicts from Stalin
to Gorbachev and Putin”

 

*** ALL WELCOME ***
Free parking after 5.00pm at Cobb Deck
All talks take place in the Pleasants Family Room of the Wilson Library (ground floor) from 5.30pm to 7.00pm

No RSVP necessary – but if you wish to reserve a seat, please email Alyssa Bowen “bowenal@live.unc.edu”

Krasno Distinguished Professorship “War and Terror against Israel: Germany (East & West), the U.S. and Israel during the Cold War and the post-9/11 World” - Oct 08th 2015

The Richard M Krasno Distinguished Professorship @ UNC-Chapel Hill

                                                                      Prof. Klaus W. Larres

 

in co-operation with the Department of History & the Peace, War and Defense Curriculum (PWAD)

the College of Arts and Sciences, UNC Global, the Center for Global Initiatives, the Center for European Studies & the Triangle Institute for Security Studies (TISS).

Subscribe to our you tube channel: www.youtube.com/KrasnoUNC

 

“The U.S. in World Affairs: the Cold War and Beyond”
— lecture series with eminent scholars —

 


Schedule FALL 2015

Thursday, Sept. 10, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Prof. Klaus Larres (UNC Chapel Hill):
“Winston S. Churchill & Peace Negotiations:
Lessons for the 21st Century?”

Tuesday, Sept. 29, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Prof. Stephen Szabo (German Marshall Fund, Washington, DC):
“Germany confronts Russia:
Geo-Economics vs Geo-Politics?”

 

Thursday, October 8, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Prof. Jeffrey Herf (University of Maryland at College Park):
“War and Terror against Israel:
Germany (East & West), the U.S. and Israel
during the Cold War and the post-9/11 World”

 

Thursday, October 22, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Dr Malcolm Byrne (National Security Archive, Washington, DC):
“The U.S. and Iran – Lessons Learned?
Missed Opportunities from the 1953 Coup to a (Possible) Nuclear Deal”

 

Thursday, November 5, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library)
Prof. Nancy Mitchell (North Carolina State University):
“Jimmy Carter, the Cold War, Human Rights, and Africa”

 

Tuesday, November 10, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library)
Dr William Burr (National Security Archive, Washington, DC)
and Prof. Jeffrey Kimball (Miami University, Ohio):

“Nixon, Kissinger, the Madman Theory & the Vietnam War”

 

Tuesday, November 17, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Dr Peter Ruggenthaler (University of Graz, Austria):
“Russia, Europe, and the U.S.:
Cold War & Post-Cold War Security Conflicts from Stalin
to Gorbachev and Putin”

 

*** ALL WELCOME ***
Free parking after 5.00pm at Cobb Deck
All talks take place in the Pleasants Family Room of the Wilson Library (ground floor) from 5.30pm to 7.00pm

No RSVP necessary – but if you wish to reserve a seat, please email Alyssa Bowen “bowenal@live.unc.edu”

Krasno Distinguished Professorship “Russia, Europe, and the U.S.: Cold War & Post-Cold War Security Conflicts from Stalin to Gorbachev and Putin” - Nov 18th 2015

The Richard M Krasno Distinguished Professorship @ UNC-Chapel Hill

                                                                      Prof. Klaus W. Larres

 

in co-operation with the Department of History & the Peace, War and Defense Curriculum (PWAD)

the College of Arts and Sciences, UNC Global, the Center for Global Initiatives, the Center for European Studies & the Triangle Institute for Security Studies (TISS).

Subscribe to our you tube channel: www.youtube.com/KrasnoUNC

 

“The U.S. in World Affairs: the Cold War and Beyond”
— lecture series with eminent scholars —

 


Schedule FALL 2015

Thursday, Sept. 10, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Prof. Klaus Larres (UNC Chapel Hill):
“Winston S. Churchill & Peace Negotiations:
Lessons for the 21st Century?”

Tuesday, Sept. 29, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Prof. Stephen Szabo (German Marshall Fund, Washington, DC):
“Germany confronts Russia:
Geo-Economics vs Geo-Politics?”

 

Thursday, October 8, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Prof. Jeffrey Herf (University of Maryland at College Park):
“War and Terror against Israel:
Germany (East & West), the U.S. and Israel
during the Cold War and the post-9/11 World”

 

Thursday, October 22, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Dr Malcolm Byrne (National Security Archive, Washington, DC):
“The U.S. and Iran – Lessons Learned?
Missed Opportunities from the 1953 Coup to a (Possible) Nuclear Deal”

 

Thursday, November 5, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library)
Prof. Nancy Mitchell (North Carolina State University):
“Jimmy Carter, the Cold War, Human Rights, and Africa”

 

Tuesday, November 10, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library)
Dr William Burr (National Security Archive, Washington, DC)
and Prof. Jeffrey Kimball (Miami University, Ohio):

“Nixon, Kissinger, the Madman Theory & the Vietnam War”

 

Tuesday, November 17, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Dr Peter Ruggenthaler (University of Graz, Austria):
“Russia, Europe, and the U.S.:
Cold War & Post-Cold War Security Conflicts from Stalin
to Gorbachev and Putin”

 

*** ALL WELCOME ***
Free parking after 5.00pm at Cobb Deck
All talks take place in the Pleasants Family Room of the Wilson Library (ground floor) from 5.30pm to 7.00pm

No RSVP necessary – but if you wish to reserve a seat, please email Alyssa Bowen “bowenal@live.unc.edu”

Krasno Distinguished Professorship “Jimmy Carter, the Cold War, Human Rights, and Africa” - Nov 06th 2015

The Richard M Krasno Distinguished Professorship @ UNC-Chapel Hill

                                                                      Prof. Klaus W. Larres

 

in co-operation with the Department of History & the Peace, War and Defense Curriculum (PWAD)

the College of Arts and Sciences, UNC Global, the Center for Global Initiatives, the Center for European Studies & the Triangle Institute for Security Studies (TISS).

Subscribe to our you tube channel: www.youtube.com/KrasnoUNC

 

“The U.S. in World Affairs: the Cold War and Beyond”
— lecture series with eminent scholars —

 


Schedule FALL 2015

Thursday, Sept. 10, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Prof. Klaus Larres (UNC Chapel Hill):
“Winston S. Churchill & Peace Negotiations:
Lessons for the 21st Century?”

Tuesday, Sept. 29, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Prof. Stephen Szabo (German Marshall Fund, Washington, DC):
“Germany confronts Russia:
Geo-Economics vs Geo-Politics?”

 

Thursday, October 8, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Prof. Jeffrey Herf (University of Maryland at College Park):
“War and Terror against Israel:
Germany (East & West), the U.S. and Israel
during the Cold War and the post-9/11 World”

 

Thursday, October 22, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Dr Malcolm Byrne (National Security Archive, Washington, DC):
“The U.S. and Iran – Lessons Learned?
Missed Opportunities from the 1953 Coup to a (Possible) Nuclear Deal”

 

Thursday, November 5, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library)
Prof. Nancy Mitchell (North Carolina State University):
“Jimmy Carter, the Cold War, Human Rights, and Africa”

 

Tuesday, November 10, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library)
Dr William Burr (National Security Archive, Washington, DC)
and Prof. Jeffrey Kimball (Miami University, Ohio):

“Nixon, Kissinger, the Madman Theory & the Vietnam War”

 

Tuesday, November 17, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Dr Peter Ruggenthaler (University of Graz, Austria):
“Russia, Europe, and the U.S.:
Cold War & Post-Cold War Security Conflicts from Stalin
to Gorbachev and Putin”

 

*** ALL WELCOME ***
Free parking after 5.00pm at Cobb Deck
All talks take place in the Pleasants Family Room of the Wilson Library (ground floor) from 5.30pm to 7.00pm

No RSVP necessary – but if you wish to reserve a seat, please email Alyssa Bowen “bowenal@live.unc.edu”

Krasno Distinguished Professorship “Nixon, Kissinger, the Madman Theory & the Vietnam War” - Nov 11th 2015

The Richard M Krasno Distinguished Professorship @ UNC-Chapel Hill

                                                                      Prof. Klaus W. Larres

 

in co-operation with the Department of History & the Peace, War and Defense Curriculum (PWAD)

the College of Arts and Sciences, UNC Global, the Center for Global Initiatives, the Center for European Studies & the Triangle Institute for Security Studies (TISS).

Subscribe to our you tube channel: www.youtube.com/KrasnoUNC

 

“The U.S. in World Affairs: the Cold War and Beyond”
— lecture series with eminent scholars —

 


Schedule FALL 2015

Thursday, Sept. 10, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Prof. Klaus Larres (UNC Chapel Hill):
“Winston S. Churchill & Peace Negotiations:
Lessons for the 21st Century?”

Tuesday, Sept. 29, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Prof. Stephen Szabo (German Marshall Fund, Washington, DC):
“Germany confronts Russia:
Geo-Economics vs Geo-Politics?”

 

Thursday, October 8, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Prof. Jeffrey Herf (University of Maryland at College Park):
“War and Terror against Israel:
Germany (East & West), the U.S. and Israel
during the Cold War and the post-9/11 World”

 

Thursday, October 22, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Dr Malcolm Byrne (National Security Archive, Washington, DC):
“The U.S. and Iran – Lessons Learned?
Missed Opportunities from the 1953 Coup to a (Possible) Nuclear Deal”

 

Thursday, November 5, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library)
Prof. Nancy Mitchell (North Carolina State University):
“Jimmy Carter, the Cold War, Human Rights, and Africa”

 

Tuesday, November 10, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library)
Dr William Burr (National Security Archive, Washington, DC)
and Prof. Jeffrey Kimball (Miami University, Ohio):

“Nixon, Kissinger, the Madman Theory & the Vietnam War”

 

Tuesday, November 17, 5.30pm (Pleasants Family Room, Wilson Library):
Dr Peter Ruggenthaler (University of Graz, Austria):
“Russia, Europe, and the U.S.:
Cold War & Post-Cold War Security Conflicts from Stalin
to Gorbachev and Putin”

 

*** ALL WELCOME ***
Free parking after 5.00pm at Cobb Deck
All talks take place in the Pleasants Family Room of the Wilson Library (ground floor) from 5.30pm to 7.00pm

No RSVP necessary – but if you wish to reserve a seat, please email Alyssa Bowen “bowenal@live.unc.edu”

Cybersecurity in the Sony and Post-OPM Hack Era - Sep 21st 2015

“On September 21st, 2015 LENS will sponsor a lunchtime presentation entitled

“Cybersecurity in the Sony and Post-OPM Hack Era”

by Mr. Paul Rosenzweig, formerly the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy in the Department of Homeland Security.

It will be held in Duke Law School, Room 3037 at 12:30pm. Lunch will be provided.”

ISIS – Terrorism at Home and Abroad - Sep 10th 2015

Stern Poster FinalJoin the Triangle Center on Terrorism and Homeland Security, the Duke Program in American Grand Strategy and the Sanford School of Public Policy on September 10th at 6:00pm in Sanford 04 for ‘ISIS: Terrorism at Home and Abroad,’ a conversation with Jessica Stern. Dr. Stern is a Fellow at the FXB Center for Human Rights at Harvard’s School of Public Health and a member of Hoover Institution’s Task Force on National Security and Law. She is the author of ISIS: The State of TerrorDenial: A Memoir of Terror, selected by the Washington Post as a best book of the year; Terror in the Name of God: Why Religious Militants Kill, selected by the New York Times as a notable book of the year; The Ultimate Terrorists; and numerous articles on terrorism and proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. Join us on the eve of September 11th for this discussion on the current state of the terrorist threat moderated by David Schanzer. This talk is free and open to the public. Parking can be found in the Science Dr. Visitors Lot.

Nuclear Security, Science, and Policy - Sep 10th 2015

“Nuclear Security, Science, and Policy”
Dr. Bryan Fearey, Los Alamos National Laboratory
Thursday, September 10
6:15 – 7:30 pm

1202 Burlington Engineering Labs

North Carolina State University
NC State’s ANS, CNEC, TISS Energy and Security Initiative, INMM

RSVP required here by Thursday at 10 am (need count for pizza order)

 

Bio: Dr. Bryan Fearey is Director of the National Security Office. He has served at Los Alamos National Laboratory for nearly 25 years in a variety of roles including Senior National Security Science Advisor. He also served as Arms Control R&D Program Manager for the Department of Defense (DoD) and as U.S. Science Advisor for START and INF Treaty negotiations in Geneva. His current responsibilities include addressing national security technical-policy issues including, inter alia, arms control (CTBT, FMCT, new START, etc.), verification, transparency, nonproliferation, the nuclear deterrent (e.g., NPR), and nuclear energy futures. He has received numerous awards including two Distinguished Performance Awards and three NNSA Awards of Excellence, as well as the highest non-career DoD award for Exceptional Public Service.

PWADAA Senior Brunch - Nov 08th 2015

RSVP Necessary

Krasno Series Presents: Dr. Malcolm Byrne (National Archive, Washington DC), The U.S. and Iran – Lessons Learned? Missed Opportunities from the 1953 Coup to the 2015 Nuclear Deal - Oct 22nd 2015

Student Lunch with Michael Putzel - Oct 20th 2015

RSVP necessary. Lunch will be provided for students attending.

PWADAA Dinner - Oct 10th 2015

RSVP Necessary

Krasno Series Presents: Prof. Jeffrey Herf (University of Maryland-College Park): War and Terror Against Israel: Germany (East&West), and the U.S. and Israel during the Cold War and the post-9/11 World - Oct 08th 2015

Krasno Series Presents: Prof. Stephen Szabo (German Marshall Fund, Washington DC): Germany Confronts Russia: Geo-Economics vs. Geo-Politics? - Sep 29th 2015

PWADAA Dinner - Sep 12th 2015

RSVP necessary

Krasno Series Presents: Prof. Klaus Larres (UNC Chapel Hill), Churchill, the United States & Peace Negotiations: Lessons for the 21st Century? - Sep 10th 2015

An Evening with General John Abizaid (U.S. Army – Retired) - Oct 20th 2015

An Evening with General John Abizaid (U.S. Army – Retired)

Tuesday, October 20 | 6:15PM

Fleishman Commons, Sanford School of Public Policy

Duke University

 

As the Combatant Commander of United States Central Command, General Abizaid was responsible for military strategy and joint operations in twenty-seven nations in the Arabian Peninsula and the Middle East, the Horn of Africa, and Central Asia. Concurrently, he oversaw humanitarian operations such as relief for earthquake victims in Iran and Pakistan, and evacuation of American citizens from Lebanon prior to and during the Israeli-Hezbollah border conflict in 2006. Before his assignments at Central Command, General Abizaid served as the ranking three-star officer on the Joint Staff as the Director of the Joint Staff. Email Aly Breuer at aly.breuer@duke.edu with any questions or for more information.

Sponsored by: The Duke University Program in American Grand Strategy

Please join the American Grand Strategy Program, the Duke International Relations Association, the Duke Islamic Studies Center and the Sanford School of Public Policy in welcoming General John Abizaid on Tuesday, October 20th for a public talk in the Fleishman Commons of the Sanford School titled “U.S. Military Response in today’s Middle East.” General Abizaid is a retired 4-star Army General and the former Combatant Commander of United States Central Command (2003-07). As the Commander of CENTCOM, General Abizaid was responsible for military strategy and joint operations in twenty-seven nations in the Arabian Peninsula and the Middle East, the Horn of Africa, and Central Asia, which included protection of the sea lanes in the Red Sea and the Persian Gulf, operations against piracy in the Arabian Sea, and support of countries throughout the region such as Yemen, UAE, Bahrain, Qatar, Oman, Saudi Arabia and Pakistan. Concurrently, he oversaw humanitarian operations such as relief for earthquake victims in Iran and Pakistan, and evacuation of American citizens from Lebanon prior to and during the Israeli-Hezbollah border conflict in 2006. Before his assignments at Central Command, General Abizaid served as the ranking three-star officer on the Joint Staff as the Director of the Joint Staff. This event is free and open to the public. Parking may be found in the Public Policy Lot.

The Borders of the Middle East Symposium: “The Hundred Year War in Palestine” - Oct 23rd 2015

The Borders of the Middle East Symposium: “The Hundred Year War in Palestine”

Thursday, October 22 | 7:00 – 8:30PM

Thomas Room-Lilly Library, Duke East Campus
Duke University

 

Please join the Duke Middle East Studies Center for a public lecture by Dr. Rashid Khalidi titled “The Hundred Year War in Palestine.” Rashid Khalidi is the Edward Said Professor of Arab Studies at Columbia University. He received his B.A. from Yale University in 1970, and his D.Phil. from Oxford in 1974.  He is editor of the Journal of Palestine Studies, and was President of the Middle East Studies Association, and an advisor to the Palestinian delegation to the Madrid and Washington Arab-Israeli peace negotiations from October 1991 until June 1993.  Please email Iyman Ahmed at iyman.ahmed@duke.edu with questions.

Dr. Trita Parsi: “The US & Iran – Can the Nuclear Deal Bring Friendship?” - Nov 04th 2015

Dr. Trita Parsi: “The US & Iran – Can the Nuclear Deal Bring Friendship?”

Tuesday, November 3 | Reception, 5:15 – 6:00PM, Lecture, 6:00 – 7:30PM

FedEx Global Education Center, Atrium and Auditorium
UNC-CH

 

Wednesday, November 4 | 12:00-1:00pm

Thomas Room, Lilly Library, East Campus

Duke University

 

Please join us for a lecture by Dr. Trita Parsi on the Iran nuclear deal titled, “The US & Iran – Can the Nuclear Deal Bring Friendship?.” Dr. Parsi is a Middle East foreign policy expert with extensive Capitol Hill and United Nations experience. He is author of “A Single Roll of the Dice: Obama’s Diplomacy with Iran” and “Treacherous Alliance”. Dr. Parsi is president of the National Iranian American Council and a former Public Policy Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. In 2010 he received the Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving World Order, and he is frequently consulted by Western and Asian governments on foreign policy matters.

A reception will begin at 5:15pm in the Florence and James Peacock Atrium before the lecture on November 3. The lecture will begin at 6:00pm-7:30pm. Please email harver@email.unc.edu with questions.

On Wednesday, November 4, Dr. Parsi will give a public lunch-time talk at Duke University for students, faculty and the public. A light lunch will be served.

Sponsors: Duke Islamic Studies Center, UNC Persian Studies, Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies, Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations

Dr. Etel Solingen on Positive and Negative Inducements in Nuclear Proliferation - Oct 22nd 2015

Seminar: Positive and Negative Inducements in Nuclear Proliferation

 NC State University (James B. Hunt Jr. Library/IEI Lecture Hall, Room 4106)
1070 Partners Way – Raleigh
Events

Date/Time
Date(s) – October 22, 2015
1:30 pm – 3:00 pm

Location
NC State University (James B. Hunt Jr. Library/IEI Lecture Hall, Room 4106)

 

Etel Solingen is Thomas T. and Elizabeth C. Tierney Chair in Peace Studies at University of California, Irvine

Abstract – The effects of international inducements on the internal politics of states that violate nuclear nonproliferation commitments remain highly contested. What conditions influence relative receptivity to positive and negative inducements? How have sanctions, trade, aid, investments, diplomacy, financial measures and military threats affected different groups? How, when and why were those effects translated into compliance with non-proliferation rules? Have inducements been sufficiently biting or too harsh, too little, too late or just right for each case?

ISIS vs. al-Qaeda: A Troubled Relationship, Guest Lecture by Barak Mendelsohn - Nov 20th 2015

What explains the conflict between al-Qaeda and its former franchise, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS)? This study traces the origins of the rivalry between the two infamous organizations. It discusses how ISIS transitioned from a branch of al-Qaeda to an independent entity, and eventually a bitter competitor that threatens al-Qaeda’s survival. They study further examines the implication of the al-Qaeda/ISIS rivalry for the larger conflict in Syria and Iraq, and for U.S. Strategy in the Middle East.
 
Barak Mendelsohn is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Haverford College and a senior fellow at the Philadelphia-based Foreign Policy Research Institute (FPRI). He specializes in radical, Islamic organizations, with an emphasis on al-Qaeda and the Islamic State. Mendelsohn is author of Combating Jihadism: American Hegemony and Interstate Cooperation in the War on Terrorism and the forthcoming book The al-Qaeda Franchise: The Expansion of al-Qaeda and Its Consequences. Please email Susan Heske with questions about this event at Sheske@email.unc.edu.
 
This event is sponsored by the Department of Political Science and the Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense at UNC-CH.

My Promised Land: The Triumph and Tragedy of Israel – A Presentation by Ari Shavit - Nov 06th 2015

Please join us NC Hillel in welcoming Ari Shavit, a leading Israeli columnist and author of critically-acclaimed, New York Times bestseller My Promised Land: The Triumph and Tragedy of Israel. A member of the editorial board of Israeli newspaper Haaretz, and a prominent commentator on Israeli public television, Shavit has become one of the strongest voices in the nation’s public arena. He challenges the dogmas of both Right and Left with his unique insights into the roles of Israel and Zionism in the 21st century. The goal of this presentation is to “promote a deeper, better-informed and far more balanced discussion of Israel and the Middle East. As the great American democracy and the frontier Israeli democracy face dramatic challenges, we should all be engaged in a profound, free and civilized discussion of the past, present and future of the Promised Land.” For more information about this event, please email Ari Gauss at ari@nchillel.org.

Co-sponsored by: NC Hillel, the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations and the Carolina Center for Jewish Studies, and the Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense.

Russia’s Involvement in Syria – A Roundtable Discussion - Oct 29th 2015

After several years of politically and militarily supporting President Bashar al-Assad’s government, Russia began airstrikes in Syria on September 30, targeting the parts of the country controlled by ISIS. However, airstrikes have also resulted in casualties among rebel groups backed by the U.S.-led coalition, prompting Western governments to question Russia’s goals and strategy in Syria. Please join for a roundtable discussion on Russia’s increasing involvement in the war in Syria with UNC faculty Stephen Gent, Charles Kurzman, Robert Jenkins, and Graeme Robertson. The roundtable participants will address, as the war in Syria continues to escalate, the competing geopolitical interests of Russia and the United States and the consequences of Russia’s military intervention both on its domestic politics and on the future of Assad’s rule. For more information or questions regarding this event, please email CSEEES at cseees@unc.edu.

Co-presented by: The Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies, The Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and UNC Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense

Violence in Jerusalem and America’s Response: A Conversation with Lara Friedman - Oct 29th 2015

Join J Street UNC in a conversation with Lara Friedman about the recent uptick in violence in Israel and the Palestinian territories. We will discuss the roots of this cycle of violence, prospects for a more hopeful future, and what Americans can do to bring about change. In particular, we will be focusing in on the issue of settlements and the consequences of the erasure of the 1967 Green Line from American and Israeli discourse.

Please contact Brooke Davies, president of J Street UNC, for more information (badavies@live.unc.edu).

Cosponsored by J Street UNC, UNC Hillel, Department of Public Policy, Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense, and Center for Global Initiatives.

Keeping Government Honest: Whistleblowers, Torture, and America’s War on Terror, An Evening with John Kiriakou - Oct 28th 2015

“On October 27, the UNC Center for Media Law and Policy will join with the UNC School of Law Human Rights Policy Lab; UNC Peace, War, and Defense Program; UNC Center for Global Initiatives; and NC Stop Torture Now to host a public address by John Kiriakou, author of The Reluctant Spy: My Secret Life in the CIA’s War on Terror. The title of Kiriakou’s talk will be “Keeping Government Honest: Whistleblowers, Torture, and America’s War on Terror.”
This event is free and open to the public.

More information: medialaw.unc.edu

Krasno Series Presents: “Germany – 25 Years after Unification” an evening in two parts - Oct 28th 2015

The Richard Krasno Professorship Presents:
“Germany – 25 Years after Unification” an evening in two parts featuring
“From Hitler to Merkel: the U.S. & Germany from 1945 to 2015”
A panel discussion with Carl-Ludwig Paeschke (author & senior editor, German television, ZDF); Konrad Jarausch (UNC); Thomas Oatley (UNC); Brittany Lehman (UNC); Klaus Larres (UNC)

“Germany’s Rush to Unification: How Unity Came about in 1989-1990”
A documentary film — “Germany: Hurry Fatherland. How Unity Came to Be” — that outlines the developments from the Fall of the Berlin Wall in Nov. 1989 to Unification in Oct. 1990–author Carl- Ludwig Paeschke will introduce his film)

No RSVP Necessary, to reserve a seat, email bowenal@live.unc.edu.
Free parking after 5:00PM at Cobb Deck

The Syrian Quagmire: Understanding Russia’s Role - Oct 29th 2015

Please join us for a roundtable discussion on Russia’s increasing involvement in the war in Syria with UNC faculty Stephen Gent, Charles Kurzman, Robert Jenkins, and Graeme Robertson.

Thursday, October 29 • 5:30 – 7:00 PM 
4003 FedEx Global Education Center, UNC-Chapel Hill

After several years of politically and militarily supporting President Bashar al-Assad’s government, Russia began airstrikes in Syria on September 30, targeting the parts of the country controlled by ISIS. However, airstrikes have also resulted in casualties among rebel groups backed by the U.S.-led coalition, prompting Western governments to question Russia’s goals and strategy in Syria.

In light of these recent developments, the roundtable participants will address, as the war in Syria continues to escalate, the competing geopolitical interests of Russia and the United States and the consequences of Russia’s military intervention both on its domestic politics and on the future of Assad’s rule.

Co-presented by:
Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies
Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East
UNC Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense

Our mailing address is:

Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies

FedEx Global Education Center

301 Pittsboro Street | CB#5125

Chapel Hill, NC 27516-5125

Join us Nov. 2 at 5:30pm – Peace Film Series - Nov 03rd 2015

FILM SCREENING

Monday, November 2 @ 5:30pm

Nelson Mandela Auditorium

FedEx GEC

301 Pittsboro St Chapel Hill, NC 27516

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

The film provides a glimpse-often a very positive one-into an Africa few have seen. It attempts to break stereotypes associated with people who live in extreme poverty while depicting sports as a tool that could be used to prevent violence among at-risk youth.

View the Trailer for the film here

Following the screening of the film, we will hold a short discussion session with Carolina for Kibera (CFK) co-founder, Rye Barcott and Rotary Peace Fellow, Osborn Kwena. Rye Barcott co-founded CFK to prevent violence and empower youth through participatory development while he was an undergraduate at UNC-Chapel Hill. He continued his leadership in CFK while serving as a Marine in Iraq, Bosnia, and the Horn of Africa. Engaged in two forms of public service at once, he fought in wars while waging peace. His memoir, It Happened on the Way to War,explores the contrasts of community development in Africa and counter-insurgency in the Marines as they clashed and converged in his head and heart. Osborn Kwena has experience in implementing public health research projects as both a field practitioner and project manager, specializing in behavior change programs. His interest in the public health field developed after working in rural areas of Kenya and understanding that basic information and innovations in health matters can greatly make a difference in rural populations, which in turn promotes peace in communities.

The Duke-UNC Rotary Peace Center

with support from UNC African Studies Center

For more information, please contact Amy Cole, coleac@live.unc.edu or 919-843-4887

“Putin vs. Obama: Are we in a Second Cold War?” A Discussion with Former U.S. Ambassador to the Soviet Union, Jack Matlock, and Former U.S. Ambassador to Estonia, Aldona Wos - Nov 03rd 2015

“Putin vs. Obama: Are we in a Second Cold War?” A Discussion with Former U.S. Ambassador to the Soviet Union, Jack Matlock, and Former U.S. Ambassador to Estonia, Aldona Wos

  • Monday, November 2nd @ 6:00-7:15pm in Sanford 04

National Security Career Panel Featuring American Grand Strategy Alumni - Nov 05th 2015

National Security Career Panel Featuring American Grand Strategy Alumni

  • Panelists: Chelsea Goldstein (Duke T’10, Team Lead for Political-Military Affairs, Pakistan Desk, U.S. Department of State); Eric Lorber (Duke PhD’10, Senior Associate, Financial Integrity Network); Ryan Boone (Duke T’13, Research Assistant, Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments)
  • Wednesday, November 4th @ 6:00-7:00pm in Rhodes Conference Room (Sanford 223)

Counterterrorism and Public Policy Fellows Informational Panel - Nov 10th 2015

​Counterterrorism and Public Policy Fellows Informational Panel

  • Panelists: Colonel Geoff Stewart, Lieutenant Colonel Jasper Jeffers, Lieutenant Colonel Lawrence (Gil) Ferguson and Lieutenant Colonel Anthony (Tony) Poole
  • Monday, November 9th @ 6:00-7:30pm in Rhodes Conference Room (Sanford 223)

An Evening with Former U.S. Ambassador to Saudi Arabia, Robert Jordan - Nov 13th 2015

​An Evening with Former U.S. Ambassador to Saudi Arabia, Robert Jordan

  • Time and location still TBD
  • Thursday, November 12th

 

“Advising President Obama in Turbulent Times” A Conversation with Former National Security Advisor, Tom Donilon - Nov 20th 2015

​”Advising President Obama in Turbulent Times” A Conversation with Former National Security Advisor, Tom Donilon

  • Thursday, November 19th @ 6:00-7:15pm in Fleishman Commons, Sanford Building
  •  Join us for what will surely be an intriguing conversation with Tom Donilon, who served as President Obama’s National Security Adviser until June 2013, to explore his experiences in the White House and some of the challenges he faced during his time.”Capping a distinguished career in public service, Tom Donilon served at the highest levels of the Obama White House and advised the President on some of his most consequential foreign policy and national security decisions. He brings to the Duke audience a keen insight into the process of strategy and an extraordinary breadth of knowledge and experience. We are fortunate to have someone of his caliber visit at such a critical time in world affairs,” says director of the AGS program, Peter Feaver, who will moderate the discussion with Donilon.Seating is limited and is on a first-come basis.

    “Advising President Obama in Turbulent Times”

    A Conversation with Former National Security Adviser, Tom Donilon

    Thursday, Nov. 19th @ 6:007:15pm

    Fleishman Commons, Sanford School of Public Policy

Ayatollahs, Atoms, and the Donald: Nuclear Politics in an Age of Unreason - Nov 03rd 2015

WalshFlyerAyatollahs2015

Bread from Stones: The Middle East and the Making of Modern Humanitarianism - Nov 04th 2015

The Trans-Border Institute cordially invites you to two events examining the global refugee crisis on

Wednesday, November 4

Bread from Stones, a highly anticipated book from historian Keith David Watenpaugh, breaks new ground in analyzing the theory and practice of modern humanitarianism. Genocide and mass violence, human trafficking, and the forced displacement of millions in the early twentieth century Eastern Mediterranean from the background for this exploration of humanitarianism’s role in the history of human rights.

Bread from Stones: The Middle East and the Making of Modern Humanitarianism

A book presentation and signing by Keith Watenpaugh, Associate Professor of Modern Islam, Human Rights and Director of the Human Rights Initiative at UC Davis
Wednesday, November 4
4-5:30 pm, Kroc Institute of Peace and Justice, Room D

Public Forum on the Global Refugee Crisis - Nov 05th 2015

Public Forum on the Global Refugee Crisis

Wednesday, November 4
6-8:00 pm, Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice Theater

Photographs of the current refugee crisis in Europe and the Middle East have shocked the world this year, much like the photographs of children packed into Border Patrol stations in Texas did last year.  Millions are on the move, and they are taking increasingly treacherous routes.  Thousands have drowned in the Mediterranean, including many children, often as a direct result of efforts to staunch the flow of refugees. While some European governments have rolled out the welcome mat, others have rolled out the razor wire, and the debate over who is responsible for refugees has risen to a fever pitch.

There’s little doubt that the armed conflicts in Syria, Iraq, and Libya are the primary causes of the current refugee exodus.  But, consideration for refugees has been almost entirely absent from the strategic planning, public justification, or estimated costs (both financial and human) of these conflicts.  The same holds true for other refugee crises, both contemporary and historical, whether they involve Afghans and Pakistanis headed to Australia, or Somalis, Iraqis, and Central Americans headed to the United States.  These conflicts hit home in San Diego, and there’s a tremendous amount of work to be done on the legal, social, and cultural impacts of global refugee crises in our own community.

Panelists will include:

  • Keith Watenpaugh, Associate Professor of Modern Islam, Human Rights and Director of the Human Rights Initiative at UC Davis
  • Jim DeHarpporte, Regional Director, Catholic Relief Services West
  • Sharon Kennedy, Director of Development for the International Rescue Committee in San Diego
  • Matthew Stephens, The Pillsbury Law Firm/Casa Cornelia Law Center
  • Rawan Arar, PhD Candidate in Sociology at UC San Diego
  • Everard Meade, Director of the Trans-Border Institute

PWADAA Senior Brunch - Nov 15th 2015

RSVP Necessary

Krasno Series Presents: Dr. William Burr - Nov 10th 2015

Krasno Series Presents: Dr. William Burr (National Security Archive, Washington DC) and Prof. Jeffrey Kimball (Miami University, OH), Nixon, Kissinger, the Madman Theory & the Vietnam War

Nancy Mitchell on “Jimmy Carter, the Cold War & Africa: Race and Human Rights” - Nov 05th 2015

Conversation with Steven Chickos: Department of State Diplomatic Security Service Officer - Nov 03rd 2015

Former PWAD Alum, Class of 2014, Steven Chickos will be coming to UNC to give a talk about his past and present works. Steven was in the United States Marine infantry having served as a Marine sniper in two tours to Afghanistan and current National Guardsman. He is completing his Masters of Arts at the University of Arizona, School of Government and Public Policy in International Security. Currently, he just graduated and completed high intensity training in anticipation of high threat assignment as a security protective specialist with the Department of State Foreign Service, Diplomatic Security Service. In his talk, he will discuss his path as a U.S. Marine infantry to his current position with DSS in anticipation to deployment.

Ayatollahs, Atoms, and the Donald: Nuclear Politics in an Age of Unreason - Nov 02nd 2015

A talk by Dr. Jim Walsh of MIT

Dr. Jim Walsh is an expert in international security and a Research Associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Security Studies Program (SSP).  Dr. Walsh’s research and writings focus on international security, and in particular, topics involving nuclear weapons and terrorism.  Dr. Walsh has testified before the United States Senate on the issue of nuclear terrorism and on Iran’s nuclear program.  He is one of a handful of Americans who has traveled to both Iran and North Korea for talks with officials about nuclear issues.  He is the international security contributor to NPR’s “Hear and Now,” and a contributor for WGBH (PBS, Boston), Al Jazeera America, and CNN.  Before coming to MIT, Dr. Walsh was Executive Director of the Managing the Atom project at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government and a visiting scholar at the Center for Global Security Research at Lawrence Livermore national Laboratory.  He has taught at both Harvard University and MIT.  Dr. Walsh received his Ph.D from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Sponsored by the Triangle Institute for Security Studies and UNC’s The Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense

Hosted by Students for Environmental Justice and Nuclear Awareness

All Welcome!  Free parking after 5pm at Cobb Deck

The Syrian Quagmire: Understanding Russia’s Role - Oct 29th 2015

Please join us for a roundtable discussion on Russia’s increasing involvement in the war in Syria with UNC faculty Stephen Gent, Charles Kurzman, Robert Jenkins, and Graeme Robertson.
________________________________________
After several years of politically and militarily supporting President Bashar al-Assad’s government, Russia began airstrikes in Syria on September 30, targeting the parts of the country controlled by ISIS. However, airstrikes have also resulted in casualties among rebel groups backed by the U.S.-led coalition, prompting Western governments to question Russia’s goals and strategy in Syria.

In light of these recent developments, the roundtable participants will address, as the war in Syria continues to escalate, the competing geopolitical interests of Russia and the United States and the consequences of Russia’s military intervention both on its domestic politics and on the future of Assad’s rule.
________________________________________
Co-presented by:
‣ Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies
‣ Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East
‣ UNC Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense

Violence in Jerusalem and America’s Response: A Conversation with Lara Friedman - Oct 28th 2015

Violence in Jerusalem and America’s Response: A Conversation with Lara Friedman
Wednesday, October 28, 2015 at 7:30pm at NC Hillel: 210 W Cameron Ave.

Join J Street UNC in a conversation with Lara Friedman about the recent uptick in violence in Israel and the Palestinian territories. We will discuss the roots of this cycle of violence, prospects for a more hopeful future, and what Americans can do to bring about change. In particular, we will be focusing in on the issue of settlements and the consequences of the erasure of the 1967 Green Line from American and Israeli discourse.

Lara Friedman is Director of Policy and Government Relations for Americans for Peace Now. As a leading authority on US foreign policy in the Middle East, Israeli settlements policy, and Jerusalem, Ms. Friedman frequently meets and briefs Members of Congress, US Administration officials, foreign diplomats, and other members of the foreign policy community. She is a frequent resource for journalists and policymakers, and regularly publishes opinion and analysis pieces in the US and Israeli press. A former Foreign Service Officer, she served in Jerusalem, Washington, Tunis and Beirut, and is fluent in French, Spanish, and Arabic.
Please contact Brooke Davies, president of J Street UNC, for more information (badavies@live.unc.edu).

Cosponsored by J Street UNC, UNC Hillel, Department of Public Policy, Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense, and Center for Global Initiatives.

12th Gunther E. Rothenberg Seminar at High Point University - Nov 07th 2015

Subject: 12th Gunther E. Rothenberg Seminar at High Point University

Address Questions to: Schneid, Frederick <fschneid@highpoint.edu>

Twelfth Rothenberg Seminar

Schedule

8:30-9:00am             Continental Breakfast
9:00-9:10am             Welcome and Introduction
9:10-10:10am           Holger Herwig, “The German Army in the Great War: New Interpretations”
10:10-10:30am         Questions
10:30-10:45am         Break
10:45-11:45am         Michael Neiberg, “On les aura: The French Army After the Mutinies of 1917”
11:45-12:15pm        Questions
12:15-2:00 pm          Lunch
2:00-3:00pm             John Gooch, “The Italian Army and the First World War”
3:00-3:30pm             Questions
3:30-3:45                   Break
3:45-4:45                   Mark Grotelueschen, “Fighting Over There: American Contributions to Military Victory on theWestern Front”
4:45-5:15                  Question
5:15-5:45                  Plenary Session

Journeys of Syrian Refugees - Nov 12th 2015

tThe Coalition for Human Rights will be sponsoring a screening and simulation activity, Journeys of Syrian Refugees. The event will begin with a short video screening providing updates on the refugee crisis in Syria and the consequent stress on countries in the Middle East and Europe attempting to house these refugees. Following the screening, each participant will be assigned a fictional refugee and guided through their respective journey to find safety. The event will conclude with a discussion of the crisis and what students in Chapel Hill can do to to improve the lives of Syrian refugees. Snacks and light refreshments will be provided. Donations will be accepted to benefit relief organizations addressing the conflict. See you there!​

Co-sponsored by the Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense

 

Krasno Series Presents: Prof. Nancy Mitchell (North Caroline State University), Jimmy Carter, the Cold War, and Africa: Race and Human Rights - Nov 06th 2015

TISS/NCSU Energy and Security Initiative Luncheon - Dec 08th 2015

Our last Energy & Security Initiative luncheon of the fall semester will be next Tuesday 12/8,  in the Talley Student Union, Room 3285, from 11:451:15 p.m., with Ivan Urlaub (flyer attached). He will be discussing “Energy Politics and Policy in North Carolina: What’s ahead?” As usual, lunch will be provided, so please RSVP through this link if you plan to join us- Please RSVP here.

NCSEA advances a clean energy path that results in net savings for all North Carolina ratepayers, works

to maintain a financially stable and reliable utility, and strives to ensure a globally and regionally

competitive energy industry and economy.  Ivan’s sixteen years of experience includes supporting

resolution of water resource disputes in the Mid-East and North Africa and ensuring adequate worst

case scenario response plans are in place for all U.S. oil pipeline operators and military installations. Ivan

serves on numerous advisory and working groups, such as RMI’s national Electricity Innovations

Laboratory (e-Lab) team, resolving challenges at the distributed edge of electricity. Ivan is currently the

Technical Principal Investigator on a U.S. DOE grant to craft actionable economic development

roadmaps for clean energy product and service R&D, manufacturing and demonstration in NC and the

Southeast.  He is a board member of the NC Clean Energy Business Alliance and holds both a Master

of Public Policy and a Master of Environmental Management from Duke University.

Professor Missy Cummings will speak about her research into robots at the Friday Center - Jan 14th 2016

Triangle Institute for Security Studies,Duke. UNC. NCSU.,DUNC_TussTiss_LogoRedoColor

Drone sly

You are cordially invited to attend a v. As one of the Navy’s first female fighter pilots, flying an F-18, Cummings realized that improvements in GPS were going to obviate her job. So she switched gears, becoming a leading researcher on UAV engineering at MIT. She is now Director of Duke University’s Humans and Autonomy Lab (Hal). In this talk, she will focus on the seemingly dramatic rise of robots in the workplace, why and when humans are still needed and the critical future of human-robot collaboration.

Contact

Carolyn Pumphrey
Triangle Institute for Security Studies
pumphrey@duke.edu
919-613-9280

When

January 13th, 2016 from 6:00 PM to 8:30 PM EST

Add to Calendar

Where

The Friday Center, Chapel Hill
One Friday Center Drive
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-1020

Visit by Charles Bowery, Chief of Military History - Feb 03rd 2016

TISS / PWAD Chief of Military History, Charles Bowery, Army Center of Military History – Feb 3

Take advantage of this unique opportunity to learn from the Chief of Military History about the Army’s new civilian employees who are historians, archivists, or museum professionals.

Hamilton Hall, Room 569

5:30 – 6:45 PM

An officer and a scholar who has led soldiers in combat, mentored cadets in the classroom, and is a published author on the American Civil War, Charles R. Bowery, Jr. is now Chief of Military History at the U.S. Army Center of Military History.  Mr. Bowery will center his presentation on the new Career Program the Army has developed for civilian employees who are historians, archivists, or museum professionals.  He will also address employment opportunities throughout the Army History Program.  A retired Colonel, Charles Bowery was commissioned to the aviation branch of the US Army in 1988.  He has seen service in the Pentagon and also served stints overseas in Korea, Iraq and Afghanistan.   Mr. Bowery taught history at West Point (2001-2003) and served as the Chief of Doctrine and Lessons Learned at the US Army Aviation Center of Excellence. He earned his Bachelor’s degree from William and Mary and his Master’s degree from North Carolina State University in 2001.

An Obama Scorecard: Cyber, Nuclear Proliferation and Geopolitical Instability - Jan 22nd 2016

A Conversation with David Sanger

Chief Washington Correspondent of The New York Times

Thursday, January 21st @ 6:30pm, Sanford Room 05

David E. Sanger is chief Washington correspondent of The New York Times. Mr. Sanger has reported from New York, Tokyo and Washington, covering a wide variety of issues surrounding foreign policy, globalization, nuclear proliferation and Asian affairs. Mr. Sanger will be joining us for a talk titled “An Obama Scorecard: Cyber, Nuclear Proliferation, and Geopolitical Instability.”
THIS TALK IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Sanger Poster1

Amb Wendy Sherman – Iran Nuclear Deal - Feb 05th 2016

Ambassador Sherman will deliver the Ambassador Dave and Kay Phillips Family International Lecture titled “Negotiating Change: The Inside Story Behind the Iran Nuclear Deal.” In the talk, Amb. Sherman will reveal details of the process that ultimately earned her the National Security Medal. AGS Director, Peter Feaver, will host the discussion. “She has spent more time with Iranian counterparts than any other senior American leader,” Feaver said, “and thus has a unique perspective on how the deal emerged and what it means for geopolitics today and in the coming years.” As Undersecretary for Political Affairs from September 2011 to October 2015, Sherman led the series of U.S. negotiations with Iran that culminated in an agreement last July.

THIS TALK IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.
Stay tuned for more information regarding lunch and dinner sign-ups.

http://sites.duke.edu/agsp/events/negotiating-change-the-inside-story-behind-the-iran-nuclear-deal-a-conversation-with-ambassador-wendy-sherman/

Ambassador Sherman will deliver the Ambassador Dave and Kay Phillips Family International Lecture at 6 p.m. in the Sanford School of Public Policy’s Fleishman Commons. The lecture is free and open to the public.

In the talk, “Negotiating Change: The Inside Story Behind the Iran Nuclear Deal,” Amb. Sherman will reveal details of the process that ultimately earned her the National Security Medal. Peter Feaver, Duke professor of political science and public policy and director of the university’s Program in American Grand Strategy, will host the discussion. “She has spent more time with Iranian counterparts than any other senior American leader,” Feaver said, “and thus has a unique perspective on how the deal emerged and what it means for geopolitics today and in the coming years.”

As undersecretary for political affairs from September 2011 to October 2015, Sherman led the series of U.S. negotiations with Iran that culminated in an agreement last July. Now a senior fellow at both Harvard’s Institute of Politics and Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Ambassador Sherman recently stepped down as Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs after four years overseeing every region of the world, dealing with every major opportunity and crisis, and, leading the U.S. negotiating team to a successful conclusion of the Iran nuclear deal.

 

A Presentation on “The Social Life of DNA” - Feb 02nd 2016

Alondra Nelson is professor of sociology and gender studies and Dean of Social Science at Columbia University, where she has served as director of the Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality. She is Chair-elect of the American Sociological Association Section on Science, Knowledge and Technology. In her lectures, books, and articles, she explores the intersections of science, technology, and social inequality.

Her most recent book, The Social Life of DNA: Race, Reparations, and Reconciliation after the Genome (Beacon Press, 2016), traces how claims about ancestry are marshaled together with genetic analysis in a range of social ventures.

Come and join the Global Inequality Research Initiative (GIRI) at their Tuesday Tea symposium series. These are intriguing, thought-provoking conversations broadly focusing on global gender inequality. Refreshments provided, please feel free to bring anyone who might be interested.

Women in National Security Panel featuring Air Force Secretary Deborah James and NGA Deputy Director Sue Gordon - Feb 19th 2016

This year, AGS’s annual Women in National Security Panel will feature two Duke alumnae: Air Force Secretary Deborah James and NGA Deputy Director Sue Gordon. The talk will be moderated by MPP student, Maureen Hartney, a former intelligence officer in the U.S. Air Force. This event is free and open to the public and will take place in the Fleishman Commons of the Sanford Building.

Ms. James has 30 years of senior homeland and national security experience in the federal government and the private sector. Prior to her current position as the Secretary of the Air Force, Ms. James served as President of Science Applications International Corporation’s Technical and Engineering Sector, where she was responsible for 8,700 employees and more than $2 billion in revenue.

Sue Gordon became the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency’s (NGA) sixth Deputy Director on Jan. 1, 2015 after more than 25 years of service with the Central Intelligence Agency. Ms. Gordon previously served concurrently as Director of the CIA’s Information Operations Center and as the CIA Director’s senior advisor on cyber. She was responsible for fully integrating advanced cyber capabilities into all of CIA’s mission areas, while protecting against the cyber threat to the CIA’s information, operations and officers.

http://sites.duke.edu/agsp/events/women-in-national-security-panel-featuring-air-force-secretary-deborah-james-and-nga-deputy-director-sue-gordon/

2016 Careers Forum - Jan 22nd 2016

Students interested in the study of intelligence and security are warmly encouraged to attend this event. It should be an enjoyable and instructive evening. Four or five UNC- PWAD alums will provide you with insights into life after graduation:  they will discuss the range of career opportunities available to those who have focused on security studies, provide guidance as to avenues to pursue, and entertain with stories drawn from their own experience.
Doors open at 6:00 PM.

Panel Discussion:  6:15-7:30 PM.

Informal Conversation over food and drink 7:30-8:30 PM

RSVP requested – go to:  EVENT PAGE.

2016 Careers Forum – Friday February 5 - Feb 05th 2016

 Students interested in the study of intelligence and security are warmly encouraged to attend this event. It should be an enjoyable and instructive evening. Four or five UNC- PWAD alums will provide you with insights into life after graduation:  they will discuss the range of career opportunities available to those who have focused on security studies, provide guidance as to avenues to pursue, and entertain with stories drawn from their own experience.
Carolina Union: Room 2420 – Doors open at 6:00 PM.
Panel Discussion:  6:15-7:30 PM.
Informal Conversation over food and drink 7:30-8:30 PM
RSVP requested – go to:  EVENT PAGE.

 

Beyond Hysteria or Apologia, the ISIS Challenge in Perspective - Jan 26th 2016

“Beyond Hysteria or Apologia, the ISIS Challenge in Perspective”

Ambassador Alberto M. Fernandez

Tuesday, January 26, 2016

5:156:45 PM

John Hope Franklin Center 240 

Ahmadieh Family Conference Hall

The ideological/propaganda challenge of the Islamic State is unique in terms of both message and propagation.  Much hyperbole has gone into either exaggerating or minimizing this challenge for reasons sometimes only tangentially connected with the threat.  Fernandez’s remarks place the potent ISIS narrative within the broader context of a deep crisis of authority in the Sunni Arab Muslim world, facilitated by regional events and amplified by historic, regional political-military shifts and an ongoing global revolution in the use of social media.

 

Ambassador Alberto M. Fernandez is Vice-President of the Middle East Media Research Institute (MEMRI) and board member of the Center for Cyber and Homeland Security at George Washington University. He retired in 2015 after 32 years in the U.S. Foreign Service with the rank of Minister-Counselor. Ambassador Fernandez served as Chief of Mission at the U.S. Embassies in Khartoum, Sudan and Malabo, Equatorial Guinea and was Coordinator at the Center for Strategic Counterterrorism Communications (CSCC) from 2012 to 2015. He also served in senior public diplomacy positions in Afghanistan, Jordan, Guatemala, Syria, Kuwait, and in the State Department’s Near East Bureau (NEA) in Washington, D.C.

To access documents written by Ambassador Fernandez, please click here.

 

Sponsored by the Duke University Center for International Studies (DUCIS) and the Triangle Institute for Security Studies (TISS).

Parking: 

Visitors may use the parking lot across the street from the Franklin Center, the Duke Family Medicine “Marshall I. Pickens Building” parking lot on Trent Drive between the Durham Freeway and Erwin Road, which is FREE and available at 5:00 PM.

 

Light refreshments will be provided.

 

 

The Unfree Exercise of Religion: A World Survey of Discrimination against Religious Minorities - Feb 09th 2016

Tuesday, February 9th: Dr. Jonathon Fox

3:00pm, Rhodes Conference Room, Sanford School

Dr. Jonathan Fox is Professor in the Department of Political Studies at Bar Ilan University in Ramat Gan, Israel. His work focuses on the influence of religion on politics, especially the impact of religion on domestic conflict and international relations. Fox was part of the Templeton Foundation-funded Religion and State project from 2008 to 2011, which collected and analyzed data on government involvement in religion. He has also worked on the Minorities at Risk and State Failure projects. Fox is the author or editor of several books and over fifty research articles and book chapters, including Political Secularism, Religion, and the State: A Time Series Analysis of Worldwide Data (forthcoming) and Religion in International Relations Theory: Interactions and Possibilities (2013, with Nukhet Sandal). His lecture will include some reflections on the research that he has recently published in his new book, The Unfree Exercise of Religion: A World Survey of Discrimination against Religious Minorities
THIS TALK IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.
Stay tuned for more information regarding lunch and dinner sign-ups.

Global Leadership: Change, Complexity, Cost – POSTPONED DUE TO WEATHER - Feb 16th 2016

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE. THANK YOU FOR YOUR PATIENCE.

Monday, February 15th: “Global Leadership: Change, Complexity, Cost”

A Conversation between Gen. Martin Dempsey and Denis McDonough

6:15pm, Fleishman Commons, Sanford School

Join us for a join event with Denis McDonough and General Martin Dempsey (retired Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff).
“The Ambassador Phillips Family International Lecture is an opportunity for Duke to hear from senior global leaders on issues of great consequence. It is hard to identify two people who have been more involved or more influential in the crucial conversations of recent American foreign policy than General Martin Dempsey and Denis McDonough. And it is hard to think of a time in recent memory when the questions of American foreign policy have beenmore fraught and interesting. This is an exceptional opportunity for Duke to hear from two remarkable public servants, one recently retired and the other still on the job,” says Peter Feaver, director of AGS.
Information regarding parking, dinner invitations and ticketing will be available shortly.

Monday, February 15th @ 5:00-6:15pm
Geneen Auditorium, Fuqua School of Business
Tickets are required.
Tickets are available at the Duke Box Office (located in the Bryan Center). Tickets are free but are required for entrance to the event. No bags will be allowed. Overflow seating will be available. Parking for the event can be found in the Bryan Center Lot.
Students: Interested in a small group lunch or attending a private reception and dinner following the public talk? Fill out this out before noon todaythis quick survey. Participants will be notified by Friday, Feb. 12.

“The Ambassador Phillips Family International Lecture is an opportunity for Duke to hear from senior global leaders on issues of great consequence. It is hard to identify two people who have been more involved or more influential in the crucial conversations of recent American foreign policy than General Martin Dempsey and Denis McDonough. And it is hard to think of a time in recent memory when the questions of American foreign policy have beenmore fraught and interesting. This is an exceptional opportunity for Duke to hear from two remarkable public servants, one recently retired and the other still on the job,” says Peter Feaver, director of AGS.

You may find Denis McDonough’s biography here and General Dempsey’s biography here.

Women in National Security Panel Secretary of the Air Force Deborah James - Feb 19th 2016

Thursday, February 18th: Women in National Security Panel

Secretary of the Air Force Deborah James

National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Deputy Director Sue Gordon

6:15pm, Fleishman Commons, Sanford School

This year, AGS’s annual Women in National Security Panel will feature two Duke alumnae: Air Force Secretary Deborah James and NGA Deputy Director Sue Gordon.
Secretary James has 30 years of senior homeland and national security experience in the federal government and the private sector. Prior to her current position, Secretary James served as President of Science Applications International Corporation’s Technical and Engineering Sector.
Sue Gordon became the NGA’s sixth Deputy Director on January 1st, 2015 after more than 25 years of service with the Central Intelligence Agency. Ms. Gordon previously served concurrently as Director of the CIA’s Information Operations Center and as the CIA Director’s senior advisor on cyber.

THIS TALK IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.
Stay tuned for more information regarding dinner sign-ups.

2016 UNC-Duke Consortium for Middle East Studies Annual Conference: WWI & The Transformation of the Middle East - Feb 20th 2016

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2016 UNC-Duke Consortium for Middle East Studies Annual Conference: WWI & The Transformation of the Middle East

Friday, February 19 | 6:00-8:15pm
Saturday, February 20 | 9:00am-5:30pm
Nelson Mandela Auditorium, FedEx Global Education Center
UNC-CH

 

This short conference will explore the consequences of World War I in the region, focusing on the creation of this new state system and the new exclusionary identities. Postwar borders and states are being contested today more than at any time over the past century, as groups like al-Qaeda seek to redefine membership and ISIS/Daesh works to reconfigure the regional map. This conference brings much-needed historical context to today’s struggles over belonging, identities, and the map of the Middle East. For featured speakers, the schedule and more, please click here.

 

This conference is free and open to the public. Online registration is requested: CLICK HERE TO REGISTER. Please register by February 15. Please contact harver@email.unc.edu with questions.

 

Co-Sponsored by: UNC College of Arts and Sciences, Duke Islamic Studies Center, UNC Performing Arts Special Activities Fund, UNC Department of History, Institute for Arts and Humanities, Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies (CSEEES), Carolina Asia Center, UNC Department of Music, UNC Department of Asian Studies, UNC Department of Geography, Carolina Center for Jewish Studies, UNC Curriculum in Global Studies, UNC Curriculum in Peace, War and Defense, UNC Center for Global Initiatives, UNC Department of Religious Studies, Duke Forum for Scholars and Publics with support form the Chancellor’s Global Education Fund.

 

2016 UNC-Duke Consortium for Middle East Studies Annual Conference: WWI & The Transformation of the Middle East - Feb 20th 2016

This short conference will explore the consequences of World War I in the region, focusing on the creation of this new state system and the new exclusionary identities. Postwar borders and states are being contested today more than at any time over the past century, as groups like al-Qaeda seek to redefine membership and ISIS/Daesh works to reconfigure the regional map. This conference brings much-needed historical context to today’s struggles over belonging, identities, and the map of the Middle East. For featured speakers, the schedule and more, please click here.
 
This conference is free and open to the public. Online registration is requested: CLICK HERE TO REGISTER. Please register by February 15. Please contact harver@email.unc.edu with questions.
 
Co-Sponsored by: UNC College of Arts and Sciences, Duke Islamic Studies Center, UNC Performing Arts Special Activities Fund, UNC Department of History, Institute for Arts and Humanities, Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies (CSEEES), Carolina Asia Center, UNC Department of Music, UNC Department of Asian Studies, UNC Department of Geography, Carolina Center for Jewish Studies, UNC Curriculum in Global Studies, UNC Curriculum in Peace, War and Defense, UNC Center for Global Initiatives, UNC Department of Religious Studies, Duke Forum for Scholars and Publics with support form the Chancellor’s Global Education Fund.

Nelson Mandela Auditorium, FedEx Global Education Center
UNC-CH

2016 UNC-Duke Consortium for Middle East Studies Annual Conference: WWI & The Transformation of the Middle East - Feb 19th 2016

This short conference will explore the consequences of World War I in the region, focusing on the creation of this new state system and the new exclusionary identities. Postwar borders and states are being contested today more than at any time over the past century, as groups like al-Qaeda seek to redefine membership and ISIS/Daesh works to reconfigure the regional map. This conference brings much-needed historical context to today’s struggles over belonging, identities, and the map of the Middle East. For featured speakers, the schedule and more, please click here.
 
This conference is free and open to the public. Online registration is requested: CLICK HERE TO REGISTER. Please register by February 15. Please contact harver@email.unc.edu with questions.
 
Co-Sponsored by: UNC College of Arts and Sciences, Duke Islamic Studies Center, UNC Performing Arts Special Activities Fund, UNC Department of History, Institute for Arts and Humanities, Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies (CSEEES), Carolina Asia Center, UNC Department of Music, UNC Department of Asian Studies, UNC Department of Geography, Carolina Center for Jewish Studies, UNC Curriculum in Global Studies, UNC Curriculum in Peace, War and Defense, UNC Center for Global Initiatives, UNC Department of Religious Studies, Duke Forum for Scholars and Publics with support form the Chancellor’s Global Education Fund.

Nelson Mandela Auditorium, FedEx Global Education Center
UNC-CH

2016 Careers Forum Hosted by PWAD and TISS - Feb 05th 2016

 Students interested in the study of intelligence and security are warmly encouraged to attend this event. It should be an enjoyable and instructive evening. Four or five UNC- PWAD alums will provide you with insights into life after graduation:  they will discuss the range of career opportunities available to those who have focused on security studies, provide guidance as to avenues to pursue, and entertain with stories drawn from their own experience.
Carolina Union: Room 2420 – Doors open at 6:00 PM.

Panel Discussion:  6:15-7:30 PM.

Informal Conversation over food and drink 7:30-8:30 PM

RSVP requested – go to:  EVENT PAGE.

TISS / PWAD Chief of Military History, Charles Bowery, Army Center of Military History - Feb 03rd 2016

Hamilton Hall Room 569
Take advantage of this unique opportunity to learn from the Chief of Military History about the Army’s new civilian employees who are historians, archivists, or museum professionals. The event is free and open to the public.  We would, however, be grateful for an RSVP.  Registration is here: BOWERY EVENT PAGE

The Arab Way of War - Feb 25th 2016

THE ARAB WAY OF WAR

The Middle East is in the grip of Islamic violence: ISIS versus the governments of Syria and Iraq; Sunnis versus Shia; Hamas and Hezbollah versus Lebanon and Israel; Saudis versus Iran. Nor is that violence confined solely to the Middle East. To help us better understand “The Arab Way of War,” UNITY presents Colonel “Tex” DeAtkine, who will speak in the Lecture Hall at 10 am on Thursday, February 25th.

A graduate of West Point who earned an MA from the American University in Beirut, the Colonel spent nine years in Lebanon, Jordan, and Egypt; served in the Defense Intelligence Agency; and, in retirement,0 trained officers headed for assignments in Iraq.

The “Lecture Hall” to which the notice refers is located at Carolina Meadows on Whippoorwill Lane off of Mt. Carmel Church Rd. on the Orange/Chatham counties line.  The Lecture Hall is above the café which is adjacent to the tennis courts.

Food Systems Governance, Food Security and Climate Change Adaptation in Africa - Feb 12th 2016

Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions and UPEP Environmental Institutions Seminar Series Spring 2016

 

Food Systems Governance, Food Security and Climate Change Adaptation in Africa

 

 

Tom Evans
Department of Geography, Indiana University

Friday, February 12

 Field Auditorium, room 1112 in Environment Hall

10:00-11:30AM

 

Students, faculty and staff are invited to attend this presentation of the Spring 2016 Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions and UPEP Environmental Institutions Seminar Series.

Our speaker will be Tom Evans, a professor in the Department of Geography at Indiana University

 

Tom Evans is a Professor in the Department of Geography and Senior Fellow with the Ostrom Workshop in Political Theory and Policy Analysis at Indiana University. His work addresses the intersection of social and environmental systems with an emphasis on household-level decision making in the context of diverse governance arrangements. Previous work focused on dynamics of deforestation/reforestation while more recently his work has investigated the impact of climate change on smallholder farming systems in Kenya/Zambia and the ability of multi-level governance regimes and farmer adaptive capacity to mitigate effects of drought.

 

Food Systems Governance, Food Security and Climate Change Adaptation in Africa
Climate change is having significant impacts on agricultural production in dryland ecosystems – this is particularly the case in Africa where a large portion of farmers are reliant on rained agricultural systems or small-scale irrigation. Efforts to anticipate and mitigate food shortages are hindered by a lack of timely data on crop conditions and local-level data assessing how farmers perceive environmental signals and incorporate those signals into changing farm strategies. Amidst this backdrop is a complex web of governance arrangements affecting food systems including direct (government maize buying programs) and indirect (water allocation rules). This presentation will discuss the interplay between governance, household-level decision making and food security based on research in Zambia and Kenya. Findings will address the adaptive capacity of farmers in different types of smallholder systems in context of changing climate patterns evident in East and Southern Africa.

 

For additional information, please contact the co-conveners of the UPEP Environmental Institutions Seminar Series: Betsy Albright (elizabeth.albright@duke.edu), Erika Weinthal (erika.weinthal@duke.edu) or Christopher Galik (Christopher.galik@duke.edu)

 

Spring 2016 Seminar Series schedule: http://nicholasinstitute.duke.edu/events/seminars

 

Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter or subscribe to our YouTube channel for more updates from these and other lectures.

Regime Support in China - Feb 17th 2016

New Faces XVII - Sep 17th 2016

Log on to the Event page to find out more about this flagship TISS event.  While it is possible to register at this time, please note that the schedule has not yet been finalized.

New Faces 18 - Sep 09th 2017

Save the Date.  For more information about this event (including the schedule and information about our speakers), log on to the conference website.

Civil-Military Relations in the 21st Century - Feb 19th 2016

Just as a reminder, General Dempsey is speaking on Civil-Military Relations in the 21st Century at the Law School (Rm 3037) this coming Friday, Feb 19th, from 12:30 pm to 1:30 pm.

This event is open to the public, so everyone is welcome (and we may have pizza!).  Feel free to pass this on to others if you would like.

Intelligence Oversight – Jon Rosenwasser - Mar 03rd 2016

On March 3 at 12:15 PM, Jon Rosenwasser will engage in a discussion with interested students  on the mechanisms of intelligence oversight.  Dr. Rosenwasser is the Minority Budget Director of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence and currently responsible for overseeing the Office of the DNI (His bio and further details can be found on the event page – see link below).  You are warmly encouraged to take advantage of this great opportunity. Lunch will be served – please do RSVP by going to the Event Website (above) and registering.

Field Trip – Visit to DC government agencies (Save the Date) - Mar 15th 2016

This visit is scheduled for Monday, March 14th and Tuesday, March 15th.  We will leave from Chapel Hill at 10 AM and visit the Spy Museum late that afternoon. We will spend Monday and Tuesday touring government agencies and leave Tuesday evening, arriving back around midnight.

Seats are limited (21). Priority will be given to active participants in the TISS IC CAE Scholars Program and in particular to students who will be graduating at the end of the year. Priority will also be given to students who have yet had the opportunity to visit agencies in DC.  We will ask students who participate in this event to report to students at their partner universities on their return.

 

 

 

North Korea as a Crucible for US-China Relations – Beardsley - Feb 26th 2016

Department of Political Science
Duke University
Durham, NC 27708-0204

 

“Terrorism and the Challenge for Diplomacy.” - Feb 25th 2016

Talk by Ambassador Anthony C. E. Quainton on “Terrorism and the Challenge for

Diplomacy.”

UNC Host/Respondent: Professor T. Leinbaugh, Department of English and

Comparative Literature/Peace, War, and Defense Curriculum.

When: Thursday, February 25th, 5:30pm-6:30pm. Reception with Ambassador

Quainton following.

Where: University of North Carolina, Wilson Library, Pleasants Family Assembly

Room, 200 South Road, Chapel Hill, NC. This event is free and open to the public.

Further Details: Ambassador Quainton has served as the US Ambassador to the

Central African Republic, Nicaragua, Kuwait, and Peru. Ambassador Quainton also

served as the Director for the State Department’s Office for Combating Terrorism and

Assistant Secretary of State for Diplomatic Security. President Clinton appointed

Ambassador Quainton as the Director General of the Foreign Service in 1997. Since

2003, Quainton has been the Distinguished Diplomat-in-Residence at the School of

International Service at American University.

Ambassador Quainton’s lecture forms part of UNC’s PWAD/CMPL 489 course, “Epic,

Empire, and Diplomacy” and is one in a series of lectures for the Trans-Atlantic Forum

for Education and Diplomacy (TFED).  Previous guest speakers in the Forum have

included Sir Christopher Meyer, the former British Ambassador to the United States,

and Ambassador Richard Armitage. The lecture series is generously supported by Joan

Gillings, Dr. Phil Lankford, by the Peace, War, and Defense Curriculum, and by the

Association of Marshall Scholars. For further information email: leinbaugh@unc.edu.

CNEC/TISS/FAS panel discussion on the future of nuclear power - Mar 18th 2016

CNEC (the NNSA consortium for nonproliferation enabling capabilities), TISS, and the Federation of American Scientists (FAS) are going to co-host a panel discussion on the future of nuclear energy, viz-a-viz the tension between international expansion of nuclear power and nuclear security.

The panel discussion will be held at the NCSU Hunt Library Duke Energy Hall on March 17 18:30 – 20:00.

The panel will be composed of well-established and accomplished people from government, industry, and academia, each with their own opinions on the future of nuclear energy and security.  Following introductions by the NCSU Deans of Engineering and Social Sciences, each panelist will give a short presentation summarizing their position.  Then the panelists will discuss the issues they identified, accepting questions from the audience.  Robert Reardon will moderate the discussion and Q&A.

MEETING THE SAFETY AND

SECURITY CHALLENGES OF

NUCLEAR ENERGY IN

THE 21ST CENTURY

A Panel Discussion with

■ Charles D. Ferguson, President, Federation of American Scientists

■ William D. Johnson, President and CEO, Tennessee Valley Authority

■ John F. Ahearne, former Chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory

Commission and Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

■ Larry D. Johnson, Adjunct Professor, Columbia Law School

Thursday, March 17

6:30 – 8:00 p.m.

Duke Energy Hall, James B. Hunt Jr. Library

Reception Immediately Following

Abstract: The global expansion of nuclear energy could help meet pressing

global energy challenges and mitigate environmental dangers, particularly global

climate change. There are, however, important tradeoffs that would have to

be addressed to achieve such benefits. Not least, a greater reliance on nuclear

energy brings security and safety risks. These risks are especially difficult to

address given disagreements over their magnitude and the most appropriate

measures to mitigate their effects. Nuclear energy’s risks and benefits are both

likely to accrue disproportionately to different stakeholders and groups. This

panel brings together prominent experts from industry, government, the policy

community, and international law and diplomacy to consider these tradeoffs and

potential ways to meet them.

Presented by the Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Public and International Affairs, College of Engineering,

College of Humanities and Social Sciences, Federation of American Scientists and Triangle Institute for Security Studies.

Geopolitics of the New Energy Landscape - Mar 04th 2016

Please join the Duke Program in American Grand Strategy, the Duke University Energy Initiative, the Political Science Department and the Triangle Institute for Security Studies in welcoming Meghan O’Sullivan for a talk titled “The Geopolitics of the New Energy Landscape.” This event is free and open to the public.

Meghan L. O’Sullivan is the Jeane Kirkpatrick Professor of the Practice of International Affairs and Director of the Geopolitics of Energy Project at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government. Between 2004 and 2007, she was special assistant to President George W. Bush and Deputy National Security Advisor for Iraq and Afghanistan during the last two years of her tenure. There, she helped run the 2006 strategic policy review on Iraq which led to the “surge” strategy.

Nuclear Security Panel - Mar 18th 2016

Come join us at a panel discussion on Nuclear Security on  Thursday,  17 March  (6:308:00 pm) – Hunt Library, NCSU campus.
Flyer Attached.  Event page with further details:

https://news.engr.ncsu.edu/event/meeting-the-safety-and-security-challenges-of-nuclear-energy-in-the-21st-century

Sponsors: NCSU,  TheTriangle Institute for Security Studies, and CNEC

You are cordially invited by our colleagues at NCSU to attend a panel discussion on Nuclear Security on  Thursday,  17 March 17 (6:308:00 pm).
Flyer Attached.

The Consortium for Nonproliferation Enabling Capabilities (CNEC) is hosting a panel discussion about meeting the safety and security challenges of nuclear energy in the 21st century on Thursday, March 17, 2016, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. in Duke Energy Hall on the second floor of the James B. Hunt Jr. Library on NC State University’s Centennial Campus.  A reception will follow the discussion.

The panelists include:

Charles D. Ferguson, President, Federation of American Scientists

William D. Johnson, President and CEO, Tennessee Valley Authority

John F. Ahearne, former Chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Larry D. Johnson, Adjunct Professor, Columbia Law School

Abstract

The global expansion of nuclear energy could help meet pressing global energy challenges and mitigate environmental dangers, particularly global climate change. There are, however, important tradeoffs that would have to be addressed to achieve such benefits. Not least, a greater reliance on nuclear energy brings security and safety risks. These risks are especially difficult to address given disagreements over their magnitude and the most appropriate measures to mitigate their effects. Nuclear energy’s risks and benefits are both likely to accrue disproportionately to different stakeholders and groups. This panel brings together prominent experts from industry, government, the policy community, and international law and diplomacy to consider these tradeoffs and potential ways to meet them.

PASS Speaker – Professor Chung-In Moon - Mar 15th 2016

I would like to invite you to attend a talk by Professor Chung-in Moon, with commentator Professor Peter Feaver, on North Korea’s nuclear weapon development, March 15, 12:00-2:00pm, 116 Old Chemistry, Duke University.

https://gm1.ggpht.com/J2zQiPFMVW__Kfg0IRzAB9cFOQDLb2R7BgxtImsG_uKZbijoju72ry999eME9GlZvX5qdt5RhLZkdd_Vb_AQMCJ_hVRVXdgP68J0kJU33IIO4-6vKu4Moegj7rX3MqEdMUVUsi3ZGxboAgddnCdYgVBPOtcI7z7QU13uQunUbKzkPfmLbJeWdAJ6AOi3HypMsK-6dWa0wd5Hs37S6NQol4PBUVBW83DFa7ImKeEIwFj_SrtYeVU5SokGXYNEa2QMv4vrm9kd5lNLuFTUt2L2uZOHFINl4kcclR5vC09hMk_hWKOW1qXp3iZ7xLLATZPd6h4oPOkOghEJh00tVAe_QftPuLkuD0K0y6iX-jBb28BMZtOj7gWFyvT_54mPZsiRhQGDFnJLBEu9QulfRdYyQpjUN81Vc4LFPbJwe1O1Spz5hN9FYoLq818ALIZcoXWF8oMUr_l0EZiFfs9shDOf3AJDTkw-qKdOOaW9X7RHnNRz2tfFQpv5Uk2EnqccI3mnZc2tCgzI3avQyNcjsoG5oBOxs0vIxm6augAmuUvmfWZL0mmwvxWNjgz9CUnXB2r6sSDWtN0_FZsXEM82lfKvB70nvkdagKwSdUKkCalj1PpM915AMnJL_ps1xb-mYOPdM1W7pv-af6vW6B2_xP7fHFiwaznJtsjJ17TMXkolOGH_5rtgZLSV0bwdLeuS=w630-h814-l75-ft

Memory, War, and Counterinsurgency in Peru: The Case of Shining Path - Apr 14th 2016

Memory, War, and Counterinsurgency in Peru: The Case of Shining Path

Wednesday, April 13 at 6:00 p.m.

UNC Fed Ex Global Education Center Rm. 1005

 

Col. Oscar Arriola Delgado, Head of the Intelligence Division of Metropolitan Terrorism, National Police of Peru

Oscar Medrano Pérez, award-winning photojournalist of Peru’s leading news magazine, Caretas

 

Co-sponsored by the Institute for the Study of the Americas; Peace, War, and Defense; the

Triangle Institute for Security Studies; the Institute for the Arts and Humanities; the College of Arts and Sciences; the Department of History; and the Department of Political Science

Shining Path Event Flyer

*Photo courtesy Oscar Medrano, Caretas

 

“A 21st Century State: Anything is Possible” Prime Minister of Estonia Taavi Rõivas - Mar 23rd 2016

“A 21st Century State: Anything is Possible”

Prime Minister of Estonia Taavi Rõivas

Wednesday, March 23rd @ 1:00pm in Rhodes Conference Room

At 36 years old, Prime Minister Rõivas is the youngest Prime Minister in the European Union since spring 2014 when he stepped into the office. The Prime Minister will be giving a talk on the importance of the changing international security order from the perspective of Estonia and Eastern Europe, and he will be joined by a delegation of many Estonian government officials and business professionals. A reception will follow the talk. This event is free and open to the public.

Secrecy and Intelligence: Opening the Black Box - Apr 19th 2016

Save the Date: Registration will open soon.

2016 Capstone Conference: “A Conversation with GEN (Ret.) Martin Dempsey & Dana Priest” - Apr 12th 2016

2016 Capstone Conference: “A Conversation with GEN (Ret.) Martin Dempsey & Dana Priest”

The UNC-TISS National Security Fellowship Program invites you to attend its final capstone conference, “A Conversation with GEN (Ret.) Martin Dempsey and Dana Priest.” Moderated by TISS Director, Peter Feaver, the event will cover a range of topics from civil-military relations, to military reform, to current events.

Event Details:

April 12, 2016 | 5:30 pm
UNC- Chapel Hill, Genome Sciences Building (Auditorium 100)
Public Parking available in the Bell Tower Deck (beginning at 5:00 pm)

For additional information, please contact Jennifer Akin (jboyle@live.unc.edu) or visit the NSFP Website.

Jennifer L. Akin, M.P.A.

Strategic Operations & Policy Fellow, Triangle Institute for Security Studies
UNC-TISS National Security Fellowship Program

TISS Intelligence Community Center of Academic Excellence

“U.S.-Iraqi Relations in the Age of Daesh/ISIL” A Conversation with Iraqi Ambassador to the U.S. Lukman Faily - Apr 01st 2016

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“U.S.-Iraqi Relations in the Age of Daesh/ISIL”
A Conversation with Iraqi Ambassador to the U.S. Lukman Faily

Thursday, March 31st @ 6:00pm in Sanford 04

Please join AGS, the Department of Political Science and the Duke Islamic Studies Center in welcoming sitting Iraqi Ambassador to the United States, Lukman Faily, for a talk titled “U.S.-Iraqi Relations in the Age of Daesh/ISIL.” This event is free and open to the public, and parking may be found in the Bryan Center lot.

“Global Leadership: Change, Complexity, Cost” A Conversation between Gen. Martin Dempsey and Denis McDonough - Apr 15th 2016

“Global Leadership: Change, Complexity, Cost”

A Conversation between Gen. Martin Dempsey and Denis McDonough

Friday, April15th @ 4:00-5:00pm
Page Auditorium, Duke University

Please join AGS and the Duke Alumni Association for a Reunion Weekend event featuring General Martin Dempsey and Denis McDonough on Friday, April 15th. More information will be released shortly regarding ticketing for this event.

“The Ambassador Phillips Family International Lecture is an opportunity for Duke to hear from senior global leaders on issues of great consequence. It is hard to identify two people who have been more involved or more influential in the crucial conversations of recent American foreign policy than General Martin Dempsey and Denis McDonough. And it is hard to think of a time in recent memory when the questions of American foreign policy have beenmore fraught and interesting. This is an exceptional opportunity for Duke to hear from two remarkable public servants, one recently retired and the other still on the job,” says Peter Feaver, director of AGS.

You may find Denis McDonough’s biography here and General Dempsey’s biography here.

“The Life of a CIA Case Officer in the Cold War – 34 Years a Spy” Featuring Jim Parker, Legendary CIA Spy - Mar 30th 2016

Wednesday, March 30th @ 12:00-1:30pm
“The Life of a CIA Case Officer in the Cold War – 34 Years a Spy”
Featuring Jim Parker, Legendary CIA Spy

Hosted by the Triangle Institute for Security Studies
Hamilton Hall 569 – UNC-Chapel Hill

“Saudi Arabia and Iran: A Middle Eastern Cold War” Featuring Michael Rubin of American Enterprise Institute and Duke’s Tony Rivera - Mar 28th 2016

Monday, March 28th @ 6:30-7:30pm
“Saudi Arabia and Iran: A Middle Eastern Cold War”
Featuring Michael Rubin of American Enterprise Institute and Duke’s Tony Rivera

Hosted by the Alexander Hamilton Society
Social Sciences 136

Honor Student Dinner Presentations – April 15 - Apr 16th 2016

Speakers and topics will be posted on April 2!  Keep your eyes peeled.

Secrecy and Intelligence Colloquium – April 18-19 - Apr 19th 2016

Secrecy and Intelligence: Opening the Black Box (18-19 April 2016) – TISS IC CAE Colloquium
 Accessing and researching the secret communities of intelligence presents researchers with significant methodological and conceptual challenges. This colloquium will bring together academic scholars, civil society members, and intelligence community practitioners from the United States and Europe to discuss research methods for analyzing intelligence communities and national security documents. This colloquium is being sponsored by the National Science Foundation, the Defense Intelligence Agency’s Intelligence Community Centers for Academic Excellence (IC-CAE) Program, the Laboratory for Analytic Sciences (LAS), the Kenan Institute for Engineering, Technology, and Science, NC State University, and the Buchdahl Fund.  REGISTER NOW! (Deadline 10 April 2016)

Peace and Development: Duke-UNC Rotary Center Spring Conference - Apr 10th 2016

On April 9th, nine graduating fellows will host Rotarians, faculty, staff, students, and local participants as they present their research on a wide range of issues affecting peace around the world.  The 13th Annual Rotary Spring Conference will take place at the FedEx Global Education Center on UNC-Chapel Hill’s campus, from 8.30 am to 4:00 pm.

The theme this year is “Peace and Development: Multidisciplinary Approaches to Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals”.

We hope to see you on April 9th, however, if you are unable to attend, please watch our Livestream here.

8.00 – 9.00           Registration

9.00 – 9.30           Welcome and Introductions

Barry Phillips, Rotary Host Area Coordinator
Wilfrid Wilkinson, Trustee Chairman, The Rotary Foundation 2012-13
Catherine Admay, Rotary Center Faculty-Director, Duke University
Susan Carroll, Rotary Center Managing Director

9.30 – 10.20        Rotary Peace Fellows Presentation – Session One

President Al Bashir and the International Criminal Court: the Challenge of Accountability                               

Presenter: Romi Brammer
Moderator: Catherine Admay

The Challenge of Linking Humanitarian Assistance and Development Cooperation in Fragile States                   

Presenter: Jae Ryul Kim
Moderator: Natalia Mirovitskaya

10.20 – 10.50      Coffee Break

10.50 – 12.05      Rotary Peace Fellows Presentation – Session Two

Ukraine: The Re-Emerging Breadbasket of Europe. Minimizing Disruptions in the Wheat Value Chain

Presenter: Cristina Andoni
Moderator: Francis Lethem

Can Mobile Technology Increase Reproductive Health Knowledge Among Refugees in Europe?

Presenter: Rebeccah Bartlett
Moderator: Barry Phillips

Is There a Link Between Intimate Partner Violence and Current Modern Contraceptive Use in the Democratic Republic of Congo?

Presenter: Jean Lambert Chalachala
Moderator: Beth Moracco

12.05 – 1.05         Lunch

1.05 – 1.15           Rotarian Action Group for Peace

1.15 – 2.05           Rotary Peace Fellows Presentation – Session Three

Capacity Building Enhancement in the Water & Sanitation Sector: Translating Training Indicators into Practice

Presenter: Osborn Kwena
Moderator: Karin Yeatts

Reducing Local Level Crime and Violence in the Northern Coast of Peru

Presenter: Elohim Monard
Moderator: Phyllis Pomerantz

2.05-2.20              Stretch Break

2.20-3.10              Rotary Peace Fellows Presentation – Session Four

Rethinking the Prevention of Violence and Crime Policy in Mexico: Should we Focus on Early Peace Building with Children?

Presenter: Vanessa Uriarte
Moderator: Rosemary Fernholz

A Local Strategy for Addressing Corruption in Acapulco, Mexico

Presenter: Carlos Juarez
Moderator: Phyllis Pomerantz

3.10 – 3.40           Presentation of Certificates and Alumni Pins

Catherine Admay, Susan Carroll and Barry Phillips

Turkish-Syrian Relations and Unrest in Turkey – A Discussion with Dr. Kemal Ilter - Apr 05th 2016

The Turkish government says that it has joined the coalition against the Islamic State, but how active has it been in the fight? It is a major transit point for foreign fighters looking to enter Syria to join the Islamic State, and for IS members needing to transit out of IS territory. Meanwhile, relations between Turkey and Russia, and Turkey and Syria, continue to worsen, while the security situation inside Turkey itself continues to spiral downward. Journalists and academics are under increasing pressure (or simply arrested), media outlets are taken over by force, Social Media platforms shut down. What is our relationship with this critical NATO ally? Where is Turkey headed? What are the repercussions of the Syrian crisis, particularly in terms of migration? This talk will address these questions and others. Dr. Kemal Iltar is a Visiting Professor of Communication at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He has a degree in Political Science and International Relations from Bosporus University of Istanbul, a Masters in IR from Ankara University, and a Master of Laws in Information Technology, Media and E-Commerce from Essex University, UK. For more information, please contact Lauren Fraizer at fraizer@live.unc.edu.

Reconsidering Antisemitism: Past and Present - Apr 19th 2016

The Carolina Center for Jewish Studies is hosting a three-day scholarly conference to explore the historical and present-day resurgence of antisemitism in many parts of the world (including North and South America, Europe, the Middle East and Africa). There is an undeniable resurgence of antisemitism in many parts of the world and recent events showcasing intolerance are alarming and generate tremendous concern for the future. As a result, there are a growing number of academic researchers who are seeking to understand this phenomenon from a scholarly perspective. The conference will include two evening lectures and a series of five in-depth panel discussions. For the full conference schedule, updated event information and online registration can be found here. The conference is free and open to the public, but due to limited seating, advance registration is required for the panel sessions. For a direct link to the registration, please click here.

This conference is made possible through private support and is co-sponsored by UNC College of Arts and Sciences, UNC School of Media and Journalism, UNC Program in Medieval and Early Modern Studies, UNC Center for Slavic, East Euro and Eurasian Studies, UNC Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures, UNC Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, and Duke Center for Jewish Studies

The 2016 Anthony Joseph Drexel Biddle, Jr. Lecture on International Studies - Apr 12th 2016

Mrs. Mary Duke Trent Jones, on behalf of the Duke-Biddle-Trent-Semans Families, & Duke University Center for International Studies invite you to:

 

The 2016 Anthony Joseph Drexel Biddle, Jr. Lecture on International Studies

 

with The Honorable William J. Burns

President of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace & former U.S. Ambassador to Russia & Jordan

 

speaking on:

 

American Leadership in a Changing International Landscape

 

Tuesday, April 12, 2016

5.00pm 

The Nasher Museum of Art Auditorium

 

William J. Burns is president of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, the oldest international affairs think tank in the United States. Ambassador Burns retired from the U.S. Foreign Service in 2014 after a thirty-three-year diplomatic career. He holds the highest rank in the Foreign Service – career ambassador, and is only the second serving career diplomat in history to become deputy secretary of state. He was ambassador to Russia from 2005 to 2008, assistant secretary of state for Near Eastern affairs from 2001 to 2005, and ambassador to Jordan from 1998 to 2001. His other posts in the Foreign Service include executive secretary of the State Department and special assistant to former secretaries of state Warren Christopher and Madeleine Albright. Ambassador Burns is the recipient of three Presidential Distinguished Service Awards and a number of Department of State awards, including three Secretary’s Distinguished Service Awards and two Distinguished Honor Awards. He has also received the highest civilian honors from the Department of Defense and the U.S. intelligence community. In 2013, Foreign Policy named him “Diplomat of the Year”.

Sponsored by the Duke University Center for International Studies.

 

This event is Free and Open to the Public.

 

Amanda Frederick

Program Coordinator

Duke University Center for International Studies (DUCIS) & International Areas

Tech Giants v. DOJ - Apr 13th 2016

The Law School is hosting a panel entitled “Tech Giants v. DOJ” to discuss the recent Apple vs. FBI controversy, a related case Microsoft is fighting on warrant-access to emails stored on servers abroad, and the future of the encryption debate.  It will be next Wednesday, April 13 at 12:30pm, Law School Room 3043.  Lunch will be served.  The Law School Event Calendar description is here: https://law.duke.edu/events/tech-giants-v-doj/

TISS IC CAE lecture – Intelligence Analysis and Foreign Policy - Apr 21st 2016

Improving Intelligence Studies as an Academic Discipline

Intelligence and National Security, 22 October 2014

In recent years there has been significant growth in the numbers and kinds of intelligence-related educational and training opportunities, with the knowledge taught in these courses and programs derived from the body of intelligence studies scholarship. The question posed here is: to what extent is this body of knowledge sufficient as a basis for the development of intelligence studies as an academic discipline?

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in Intelligence and National Security on 22/10/2014, available free online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02684527.2014.952932#.VK4-BCusWVM.

ORNL VISIT - Oct 08th 2016

DATE – October 5-7, Visit to Oak Ridge and Y12
PURPOSE – Two day workshop on nuclear security and visit to National Laboratory and Y12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge Tennessee.

Please sign on to express your interest no later than July 15, 2016.  EXPRESSION OF INTEREST

Seats for this trip are limited. Our selection will be based on a range of factors, the most important of which is a demonstrated interest in and academic study of nuclear issues. We will advise you of your status in early August and begin the process of collecting the information we need to send to ORNL once the semester begins.

Open only to US citizens. 

Public talk by Chair of NIC, Dr. Gregory Treverton - Aug 31st 2016

tPublic Lecture: “Intelligence: View from the National Intelligence Council.”
tSpeaker: Dr. Gregory Treverton, Chairman of the NIC.
tWhere:  Carolina Inn, Chapel Hill, Hill Ballroom
tDate:  Tuesday, August 30, 2016
tTime: 6:00 – 7:00 PM

SAVE THE DATE – REGISTRATION WILL OPEN NO LATER THAN JUNE 15.

Gregory Treverton has served as Chairman of the National Intelligence Council since September 8, 2014. Prior to assuming this office, Dr. Treverton held a variety of leadership positions at RAND Corporation, where he focused on issues relating to terrorism, intelligence and law enforcement, as well as new forms of  public–private partnership. Earlier in his career he served in government in a number of capacities, to include working for the first Senate Select Committee on Intelligence. He has published widely on intelligence topics, most recently on the subject of reorganizing US domestic intelligence and holds a Ph.D. (economics and politics) from Harvard University.

Intelligence: View from the NIC - Aug 31st 2016

When

Tuesday August 30, 2016 from 6:00 PM to 7:10 PM EDT
Add to Calendar

Where

Carolina Inn – Hill Ballroom
Chapel Hill, NC 27516

Contact

Carolyn Pumphrey, Ph.D.
Triangle Institute for Security Studies IC CAE in Intelligence and Security Studies
919-619-0547
pumphrey@duke.edu

Intelligence: View from the NIC

 

You are cordially invited to a public presentation by

Dr. Gregory Treverton, Chairman of the National Intelligence Council.  

Date and Time: August 30 at 6:00 PM. 

Carolina Inn, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

 

Register Now!                           Please RSVP by registering using the link above at your earliest convenience. Thanks!

 

Gregory Treverton has served as Chairman of the National Intelligence Council since September 8, 2014. Prior to assuming this office, Dr. Treverton held a variety of leadership positions at RAND Corporation, where he focused on issues relating to terrorism, intelligence and law enforcement, as well as new forms of  public–private partnership. Earlier in his career he served in government in a number of capacities, to include working for the first Senate Select Committee on Intelligence. He has published widely on intelligence topics, most recently on the subject of reorganizing US domestic intelligence. He holds a Ph.D. (economics and politics) from Harvard University.

 

A Conversation with the Director of National Intelligence, James R. Clapper - Sep 27th 2016

A Conversation with the Director of National Intelligence, James R. Clapper

 

You are cordially invited to a public presentation featuring

The Honorable James R. Clapper, DNI

Date and Time: September 27 at 6:00 PM. 

Koury Auditorium, UNC-CH campus

Register Now!Registration is not required, nor will it guarantee you a seat at this event. However, it will permit us to notify you of any last minute changes in the program, and enable us to assess interest.  Doors will open at 5:30 PM and general seating will be available on a first come, first served basis. We have arranged for viewing from an overflow room in the event that the auditorium is full when you arrive.

 

James R. Clapper has served as Director of National Intelligence August 9, 2010. He leads the Intelligence Community, serving as the principal intelligence advisor to the President.  During the course of a long and distinguished career, he served in the U.S. Armed Forces, as a civilian, and as an intelligence officer. His 32 year career in the military started as a rifleman in the U.S. Marine Corps, and culminated as a lieutenant general in the U.S. Air Force and Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency.  He served two combat tours during the Southeast Asia conflict and held many intelligence-related positions, to include Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence at U.S. Air Force Headquarters during Operations Desert Shield/Desert Storm and Director of Intelligence for three war-fighting commands: U.S. Forces Korea, Pacific Command, and Strategic Air Command. After retiring from the military, he worked for six years in industry, where his business focus was the Intelligence Community. He returned to the government in 2001, serving for five years as Director of the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency and for three as Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence.

More: Official Biography.

 

 

Directions and Parking

For the Maurice J. Koury Auditorium: Maps and Directions.

Parking is available after 4PM in the UNC Kenan-Flagler Parking Deck.

“Combating Threats at Home & Abroad” A Conversation with: Department of Homeland Security Secretary Jeh C. Johnson - Sep 08th 2016

Johnson Poster

U.S. Department of Homeland Security Secretary Jeh C. Johnson will discuss threats at home and abroad at Duke University’s Sanford School of Public Policy Thursday, Sept. 8, for the 15th Anniversary of 9/11.

The event, “Combating Threats at Home and Abroad:  A Conversation with the Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh C. Johnson on the 15th Anniversary of 9/11” is free and open to the public, and will take place at 6 p.m. in the Fleishman Commons. Event parking will be available in the Public Policy Lot or the Science Drive visitor lot.

As the fourth Secretary of Homeland Security, Johnson will discuss counterterrorism and homeland security policy in context of the changing nature of the current conflict.

Johnson has also served as General Counsel to the Department of Defense and the Department of the Air Force and as an Assistant United States Attorney. “Jeh Johnson has had a seat at the table in the key decisions about U.S. security policy over the past seven and a half years,” said event interlocutor David Schanzer, professor at the Sanford School of Public Policy and Director of the Triangle Center on Terrorism and Homeland Security.

“Secretary Jeh Johnson is a thoughtful leader and a man of integrity and is uniquely positioned to share his insights on national security,” said General Martin Dempsey, retired chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and current Rubenstein fellow at Duke.

Event sponsors include the Duke American Grand Strategy Program, the Triangle Center on Terrorism and Homeland Security, the Sanford School of Public Policy, the Political Science Department and the Triangle Institute for Security Studies.

An Alternative National Security Framework at Stake in the Election - Sep 16th 2016

“An Alternative National Security Framework at Stake in the Election”

A Conversation with:
Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Bert Mizusawa

Thursday, September 15th @ 6:30-7:45pm

Sanford 04, Sanford School of Public Policy

***If you would like to request a seat at dinner following the event, please sign-up here no later than Sunday September 11th at 11:59PM.***

Major General (Ret.) Bert Mizusawa has been named by the Washington Post as one of Republican Presidential Candidate Donald Trump’s foreign policy advisors.

“Maj. General Bert Mizusawa retired after a distinguished career in national security spanning several decades.  He has seen national security policymaking up close, and brings an interesting perspective to bear on the topics in dispute during this election cycle.  While some national security experts have criticized the platform on which Donald Trump is running, Mizusawa takes a different point of view.  I am confident that the Duke community will find this a fascinating and timely conversation.”—Dr. Peter Feaver

MG Mizusawa assumed command of the Combined Joint Interagency Task Force- Afghanistan on 22 March 2014. His assignments include commander of a Joint Operational Analysis team in Afghanistan, Deputy to the Commanding General, Multinational Corps-Iraq and Deputy Director for Strategic Initiatives, J5, Joint Chiefs of Staff.

As a civilian, Mizusawa was a Wall Street lawyer (1990-94), a Professional Staff Member on the Senate Armed Services Committee (1995-98), Deputy Undersecretary of the Army for Interagency and International affairs (1998-01), and president of ITA, Inc., a technology firm (2001-04). In 2004, he founded Paxcentric, Inc., a consulting firm and serves as its president.

This event is free and open to the public.

Sponsored by: AGS, the Department of Political Science, and the Triangle Institute of Security Studies. For more information, visit the AGS event page.

Fighting Human Trafficking Panel - Sep 29th 2016

Fighting Human Trafficking Panel

Featuring:
Amb. Susan Coppedge, Amy Pope & Andrea Wilson

Thursday, September 29th @ 5:30-6:45pm

Fleishman Commons, Sanford School of Public Policy

Please join AGS and the Sanford School of Public Policy for a panel on Fighting Human Trafficking, featuring three Duke alumnae:

  • Ambassador Susan Coppedge, PPS’88, Ambassador-at-Large, Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons, U.S. Department of State
  • Amy Pope, JD’01, Deputy Assistant to the President, Deputy Homeland Security Advisor, The White House
  • Andrea Wilson, MPP/MBA’12, Foreign Affairs Officer, Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons, U.S. Department of State

The Western Hemisphere Policy Agenda: A View from Washington - Sep 21st 2016

“The Western Hemisphere Policy Agenda:
A View from Washington”

A Conversation with Eric Farnsworth
Vice President, Council of the Americas

Wednesday, September 21st @ 12:00pm

John Hope Franklin Center 240

DIA Recruiting Open House/Information Session - Sep 15th 2016

Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) is interested in hiring interested PWAD students for careers in U.S. intelligence. Visitors from DIA will be offering PWAD students two opportunities to learn more about DIA careers on Thursday, September 15. Attend one or both of the following events:

DIA Recruiting Open House/Information Session, September 15 — 9-11AM
Hamilton Hall 569
Stop by this open-house session to speak with a representative from DIA’s Recruitment Center who can answer your questions about career paths at DIA as well as the application and clearance process. The recruiter is making a special effort to begin this session early at 9 to accommodate students with classes at 9:30, so feel free to stop by and say hello before classes start.

Grand Strategy & American Power in the Asia Pacific - Oct 04th 2016

“Grand Strategy & American Power in the Asia Pacific”

A Conversation with Michael Green

Tuesday, October 4th @ 6:00-7:15pm

Sanford 05, Sanford School of Public Policy

***Students interested in attending a private meeting with Michael Green from 4:30-5:30pm, please sign-up at this link no later than Friday, September 30th at 5:00pm.***

***Students interested in attending a private dinner with Michael Green directly following the public talk, please sign-up at this link no later than Friday, September 30th at 5:00pm.***

Please join AGS, the Program in Asian Security Studies, the Asian Pacific Studies Institute, the Political Science Department and the Triangle Institute for Security Studies in welcoming Michael Green for a talk titled, “Grand Strategy and American Power in the Asia Pacific since 1783.” Michael Green is the Former NSC Director for Asian Affairs and Former Special Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs. He is currently the Senior Vice President for Asia and Japan Chair at the Center for Strategic & International Studies (CSIS) and Chair in Modern and Contemporary Japanese Politics and Foreign Policy, Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University.

This event is free and open to the public. Parking may be found in the Bryan Center pay lot.

America at a Crossroads: The 2016 Election - Oct 25th 2016

“America at a Crossroads: The 2016 Election”

A Conversation with Karl Rove and Jim Messina

Tuesday, October 25th @ 5:00-6:15pm

Page Auditorium

Karl Rove, Deputy Chief of Staff and Senior Advisor to President George W. Bush, and Jim Messina, Deputy Chief of Staff and Campaign Manager to President Barack Obama, are two of the most iconic and sought-after political pundits of our time. With extensive campaign experience for both major political parties, there are few in better positions to comment on the current state of the 2016 election. Taking place exactly two weeks prior to America’s decision, this event will surely be one of the most informative and timely campaign events of Duke’s fall.

Attendees will need to secure tickets at the Duke Box Office to attend this event. Tickets are free and limit two per person. For group reservations, contact Aly Breuer (aly.breuer@duke.edu). Tickets will go on sale for the Duke community (students, faculty, staff) beginning Wednesday, October 12th and will then go on sale for the general public beginning October 14th.

Parking can be found at the Bryan Center pay lot. For more information, visit AGS’s event page.

The Future of NATO as a Force for Global Stability: Post-Turkish Coup & Post-Brexit - Nov 02nd 2016

“The Future of NATO as a Force for Global Stability:

Post-Turkish Coup & Post-Brexit”

A Conversation with Admiral (Ret.) James Stavridis

Tuesday, November 1st @ 6:00pm

Nasher Museum of Art

Admiral James Stavridis, former supreme allied commander of NATO and former commander of the U.S. Southern Command, will speak at Duke University on Tuesday, Nov. 1.

His talk, “The Future of NATO as a Force for Global Stability: post-Turkish Coup and post-Brexit,” begins at 6 p.m. in the Nasher Museum of Art Auditorium and is free and open to the public.  The talk will be the first lecture in a new speaker series at Duke on the challenges of global governance funded by the Ambassador Dave and Kay Phillips Family International Lectureship.

Stavridis is currently dean of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. During his 30 years with the United States Navy, he served as commander of the U.S. Southern Command and the U.S. European Command, and as the NATO supreme allied commander. He has written several books and articles on national security and foreign policy, and his views are often sought out by the media.

Stavridis’ talk is hosted by the Duke University Center for International and Global Studies, the Duke University Program in American Grand Strategy, the Sanford School of Public Policy, and the Triangle Institute for Security Studies.

Destabilizing Threat Construction: Critical Perspectives on How to Counter Terror - Nov 04th 2016

The Security Studies Certificate Program at NCCU  invites you to a talk by

Dr. Kathryn Fisher (National Defense University), 

“Destabilizing Threat Construction: Critical Perspectives on How to Counter Terror”

Where: 202 BBRI (Julius L. Chambers Biomedical/Biotechnology Research Institute)

When:  3:00-4:30 PM, November 4, 2016.

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About the Speaker

About the talk:   In thinking about temporality, global politics, and security, it is important to think about conditional (non)belonging in the context of identity, insecurity, and counterterrorism. To minimize consequences of “othering” that increase insecurity, it is imperative to critically investigate threat labels as well as the exclusionary “us/them” meanings that such labels are constructed through and legitimized by. This requires not only dislocating status quo time horizons and associated identity assumptions, but also prioritizing empathy, imagination, and analytical risk-taking.

Visitor Parking Permit can be obtained from Sheri A. Starks, NCCU Police Department Traffic Office, 2010 Fayetteville Street, Durham.

Online campus map: http://www.nccu.edu/formsdocs/proxy.cfm?file_id=393.

For additional information, please, contact Rolin Mainuddin, (919) 530-7259 or rmainuddin@nccu.edu.

After ISIL: Stability and Spillover” A One-Day Conference - Dec 03rd 2016

“After ISIL: Stability and Spillover”

A One-Day Conference

Hosted by AGS, LUCAS, USASOC and TISS

Friday, December 2nd @ 8:15am-5:00pm

White Lecture Hall, Duke East Campus
***Register Here!***

 Check out the Laboratory for Unconventional Conflict Analysis and Simulation (LUCAS) information here!

What:

The purpose of this one-day conference is to help the Special Operation Forces (SOF) community’s strategic planning and forward posturing by accessing academic expertise. The underlying premise of this event is that defeating ISIS militarily, retaking Mosul, Raqqa, and other territory in Iraq and Syria, will not completely eliminate them as a threat. Therefore, the intellectual motivation for this conference is this question: what are the greatest challenges and opportunities to peace and stability after the military defeat of ISIS? To further focus this question we propose one panel on the after effects in Iraq and Syria, a second panel on the impact of foreign fighter flow from Iraq/Syria through Turkey into Europe, with a focus on Southeastern Europe (the Balkans), and lastly a panel focused on the effects of these scenarios on U.S.-Russia relations.

For our non-Duke affiliated guests, the closest paid parking lot to the event can be found in the Brightleaf Square district, at Main St. and Gregson St. Guests who chose to park here can either walk to Richard White Lecture Hall (an 11-minute walk), or take a westbound Bull City Connector bus (free of charge), which stops right outside of East Campus at W. Main St and Campus Dr.

After the conference wraps up around 5 PM, there will be a networking reception at Alivia’s Durham Bistro, which is also located at Main St. and Gregson St. Guests can choose to walk to Alivia’s from the conference venue, or take an eastbound Bull City Connector bus (free of charge), which stops right across the street from Alivia’s Durham Bistro.
To book your hotel, for those of you coming from out of town, follow this link: Book your group rate for LUCAS CONFERENCE.

Panel Questions:

After ISIL: Stability and Spillover, December 2nd, Duke University
Panel Questions:
Panel 1: After ISIS: The Search for Peace and Stability in Iraq and Syria, 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.
Given the multi-cultural make-up of both countries, with various language groups, religious sects, ethnicities, and tribal affiliations, how can U.S. DoD and other entities help guarantee cultural security? Generally, what role are these cultural differences likely to play? What type of cultural violence was done by ISIS? What opportunities does cultural security provide?
What role will NGOs likely play in the stability of these two countries, given the damage of war, the exacerbation of cultural conflicts, and the like? How can stakeholders best vet NGOs to ensure that stability and security are their goals? Is it likely that nefarious actors will use NGOs as covers to exacerbate conflict and degrade security?
What will nefarious actors do to oppose stability and security in Iraq and Syria? What are the most likely information operations goals and techniques that these actors are likely to deploy? What do we really know about their messaging capabilities and what opportunities do they present to U.S. policy makers?
Panel 2: After ISIS spillover in the Balkans, 10:45 to 1:00 p.m.
What do we know/need to know about the Balkans as a through way for former ISIS fighters returning or migrating to Europe? How viable is this threat? How likely is this path? What are the economic, political, social and other variables that present opportunities and challenges for ISIS fighters and those trying to control the flow of foreign fighters to Europe? What is the landscape of transnational criminal organizations in the Balkans? What opportunities and challenges does this present to ISIS? What should U.S. policy be to stem the flow of foreign fighters into this region? With whom should the U.S. be partnering? What are the best opportunities to thwart ISIS from penetrating Europe through this corridor?
Lunch 1:00 p.m. to 2:15 p.m.
Panel 3: After ISIS: U.S. – Russia Relations, 2:30 to 4:00 p.m.
Given the complex nature of current U.S. – Russia relations, what would the quest for stability in Iraq and Syria and potential intervention in the Balkans portend for this relationship? Does the foreign fighter flow to the Balkans present a challenge, an opportunity, or both to deepen cooperation between these two actors? What are these challenges and opportunities? How can the U.S. best position itself to operate effectively against ISIS, while constructively engaging Russia? What is the best way to characterize Russian interests/policy in the problem sets identified here?
Keynote Speaker: To be announced, 4:15 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Unhosted Social: Alivia’s Bistro, 5:30 p.m.

What:

The purpose of this one-day conference is to help the Special Operation Forces (SOF) community’s strategic planning and forward posturing by accessing academic expertise. The underlying premise of this event is that defeating ISIS militarily, retaking Mosul, Raqqa, and other territory in Iraq and Syria, will not completely eliminate them as a threat. Therefore, the intellectual motivation for this conference is this question: what are the greatest challenges and opportunities to peace and stability after the military defeat of ISIS? To further focus this question we propose one panel on the after effects in Iraq and Syria, a second panel on the impact of foreign fighter flow from Iraq/Syria through Turkey into Europe, with a focus on Southeastern Europe (the Balkans), and lastly a panel focused on the effects of these scenarios on U.S.-Russia relations.

For our non-Duke affiliated guests, the closest paid parking lot to the event can be found in the Brightleaf Square district, at Main St. and Gregson St. Guests who chose to park here can either walk to Richard White Lecture Hall (an 11-minute walk), or take a westbound Bull City Connector bus (free of charge), which stops right outside of East Campus at W. Main St and Campus Dr.

After the conference wraps up around 5 PM, there will be a networking reception at Alivia’s Durham Bistro, which is also located at Main St. and Gregson St. Guests can choose to walk to Alivia’s from the conference venue, or take an eastbound Bull City Connector bus (free of charge), which stops right across the street from Alivia’s Durham Bistro.
To book your hotel, for those of you coming from out of town, follow this link: Book your group rate for LUCAS CONFERENCE.

Panel Questions:

After ISIL: Stability and Spillover, December 2nd, Duke University
Panel Questions:
Panel 1: After ISIS: The Search for Peace and Stability in Iraq and Syria, 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.
Given the multi-cultural make-up of both countries, with various language groups, religious sects, ethnicities, and tribal affiliations, how can U.S. DoD and other entities help guarantee cultural security? Generally, what role are these cultural differences likely to play? What type of cultural violence was done by ISIS? What opportunities does cultural security provide?
What role will NGOs likely play in the stability of these two countries, given the damage of war, the exacerbation of cultural conflicts, and the like? How can stakeholders best vet NGOs to ensure that stability and security are their goals? Is it likely that nefarious actors will use NGOs as covers to exacerbate conflict and degrade security?
What will nefarious actors do to oppose stability and security in Iraq and Syria? What are the most likely information operations goals and techniques that these actors are likely to deploy? What do we really know about their messaging capabilities and what opportunities do they present to U.S. policy makers?
Panel 2: After ISIS spillover in the Balkans, 10:45 to 1:00 p.m.
What do we know/need to know about the Balkans as a through way for former ISIS fighters returning or migrating to Europe? How viable is this threat? How likely is this path? What are the economic, political, social and other variables that present opportunities and challenges for ISIS fighters and those trying to control the flow of foreign fighters to Europe? What is the landscape of transnational criminal organizations in the Balkans? What opportunities and challenges does this present to ISIS? What should U.S. policy be to stem the flow of foreign fighters into this region? With whom should the U.S. be partnering? What are the best opportunities to thwart ISIS from penetrating Europe through this corridor?
Lunch 1:00 p.m. to 2:15 p.m.
Panel 3: After ISIS: U.S. – Russia Relations, 2:30 to 4:00 p.m.
Given the complex nature of current U.S. – Russia relations, what would the quest for stability in Iraq and Syria and potential intervention in the Balkans portend for this relationship? Does the foreign fighter flow to the Balkans present a challenge, an opportunity, or both to deepen cooperation between these two actors? What are these challenges and opportunities? How can the U.S. best position itself to operate effectively against ISIS, while constructively engaging Russia? What is the best way to characterize Russian interests/policy in the problem sets identified here?
Keynote Speaker: To be announced, 4:15 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Unhosted Social: Alivia’s Bistro, 5:30 p.m.

The Question of Intervention: John Stuart Mill and the Responsibility to Protect - Dec 01st 2016

“The Question of Intervention:
John Stuart Mill and the Responsibility to Protect”

A Lecture by Michael Doyle

Hosted by AGS and the Security, Peace & Conflict Workshop

Thursday, December 1st @ 12:00-1:30pm

Gross Hall 270, Duke West Campus

Michael Doyle (Columbia University) will present his book, The Question of Intervention: John Stuart Mill and the Responsibility to Protect, at the SPC Workshop on Thursday, December 112:00-1:30 in Gross 270. Lunch will be served. Please find the Introduction and first chapter of the book attached and summary below:

“The question of when or if a nation should intervene in another country’s affairs is one of the most important concerns in today’s volatile world. Taking John Stuart Mill’s famous 1859 essay “A Few Words on Non-Intervention” as his starting point, international relations scholar Michael W. Doyle addresses the thorny issue of when a state’s sovereignty should be respected and when it should be overridden or disregarded by other states in the name of humanitarian protection, national self-determination, or national security. In this time of complex social and political interplay and increasingly sophisticated and deadly weaponry, Doyle reinvigorates Mill’s principles for a new era while assessing the new United Nations doctrine of responsibility to protect. In the twenty-first century, intervention can take many forms: military and economic, unilateral and multilateral. Doyle’s thought-provoking argument examines essential moral and legal questions underlying significant American foreign policy dilemmas of recent years, including Libya, Iraq, and Afghanistan.”

China’s resource and infrastructure development in Southeast Asia - Jan 19th 2017

China’s resource and infrastructure development in Southeast Asia

 

A TISS Dinner-Seminar

featuring

Jessica Liao

 

 

Where: Friday Center, Chapel Hill

When: 18 January, 6:30 – 8:30 PM

To reserve a seat, please register online on or before January 12th.  Registration will close automatically when all seats are filled or when the registration deadline is reached. You can get on a wait list by contacting  pumphrey@duke.edu

Register Now!

 

About the Speaker:  

Jessica C. Liao (Ph.D. in International Relations, University of Southern California) is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at North Carolina State University. Prior to joing the faculty at NC State University, she taught at George Washington University and was a Visiting Fellow at Monash University, Kuala Lumpur campus. Professor Liao’s research focuses on Chinese foreign policy and East Asian politics. She is the author of Developmental States and Business Activism: East Asia’s Trade,  Dispute Settlement (London: Palgrave Macmillan), November 2015 and her current project examines China’s resource and infrastructure development in Southeast Asia.

 

The Friday Center is located close to the UNC campus in Chapel Hill. Parking is readily available.

For more information, check out: http://fridayconferencecenter.com/

Cyber, Security & Surveillance: Truth & Consequences - Feb 25th 2017

As I think you probably know, each year Duke Law’s Center on Law, Ethics and National Security holds its annual national security law conference here in Durham.  This year’s is on Friday, Feb 24th and Saturday morning, Feb 25thand the theme is Cyber, Security & Surveillance: Truth & Consequences.  

 

Anyway, you are cordially invited to attend.  We have an especially awesome lineup of speakers and panelists, and I urge you to check out the agenda found here.

If you are thinking this is something just for lawyers, you’d be mistaken.  Typically, we draw a wide range of attendees from academia, government (to include the military), media, and from other disciplines as well as law.  If you’re interested in national security, you’ll want to be at this event.

Moreover, although the focus is on cyber,  we will also be paying attention to a very timely subject in the aftermath of the election: civil-military relations.  We will be joined by authors Rosa Brooks, Georgetown Law, author of How Everything Became War and the Military Became Everything: Tales from the Pentagon(2016); Kori Schake, Hoover Institution, editor of Warriors and Citizens: American Views of Our Military (2016); and Bill Banks, Syracuse Law, author of Soldiers on the Home Front: The Domestic Role of the American Military (2016).

I especially invite your attention to the conference dinner on Friday night at the beautiful Washington Duke Inn.  Our guest speaker will be Monika Bickert from Facebook (she’s Head of Global Policy Management there).  If anyone hasn’t had a chance to have visit there, this is a great (and relatively economical!) time to do so as there will be plenty of opportunities to network not only with our guest speakers and panelists, but also with practitioners as well as students interested in this area of the law.)

Anyone who’d like to attends needs to register, and that can be done here.  Since the conference fills up very quickly, I urge folks to register as soon as possible.   

The registration fee for the two-day conference is only $35 (that includes two continental breakfasts and a box lunch) and the cost of the dinner is just $75.  However, for fulltime students and active duty military members, the registration fee is $25 and their cost for the dinner is $35. (Just so you know, it actually costs us over a $100 per person to put on the conference, and for those who attend the conference dinner, please know it is “significantly” subsidized.)

Anyway, I hope to see you there!!

Charles J. Dunlap, Jr.

Major General, USAF (Ret.)

“The Grand Strategy Surprises that Await President Trump” A Conversation with Colin Kahl - Jan 26th 2017

“The Grand Strategy Surprises that Await President Trump”

A Conversation with Colin Kahl

Hosted by AGS, the Department of Political Science, and the Triangle Institute for Security Studies 

Wednesday, January 25th @ 6:00-7:15pm

Room 04, Sanford School of Public Policy

***Students interested in attending a private dinner with Colin Kahl directly following the public talk, please sign-up at this link no later than Friday, January 20th at 5:00pm***
Please join AGS, the Department of Political Science, and the Triangle Institute for Security Studies in welcoming Colin Kahl for a talk titled, “The Grand Strategy Surprises that Await President Trump.” Colin Kahl served as the National Security Advisor to Vice President Joe Biden and Deputy Assistant to President Obama from October 2014 to January 2017. In this position, he served as a senior advisor to President Obama and Vice President Biden on all matters related to U.S. foreign policy and national security affairs. He is currently an associate professor in the Security Studies Program at Georgetown University’s Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service.

This event is free and open to the public. Parking may be found in the Bryan Center pay lot.

“How President Trump’s Nationalist Foreign Policy Will Affect America” A Conversation with Paul D. Miller - Feb 02nd 2017

“How President Trump’s Nationalist Foreign Policy Will Affect America”
A Conversation with Paul D. Miller

Hosted by AGS, Duke Political Science, and TISS

Wednesday, February 1st @ 6:00pm-7:15pm

Room 05, Sanford School of Public Policy

***Students interested in attending a private dinner with Paul D. Miller directly following the public talk, please sign up at this link no later than Friday, January 27th at 5:00pm***
Please join AGS, the Department of Political Science, and the Triangle Institute for Security Studies in welcoming Paul D. Miller for a talk titled, “How President Trump’s Nationalist Foreign Policy Will Affect America.” Dr. Miller served as the Director for Afghanistan and Pakistan on the National Security Council staff from 2007 to 2009 and worked as an intelligence analyst for the Central Intelligence Agency from 2003 to 2007. He is currently the associate director of the Clements Center for National Security at The University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Miller’s most recent book, American Power and Liberal Order: A Conservative Internationalist Grand Strategy, will be available for purchase and signing following the talk.

This event is free and open to the public. Parking may be found in the Bryan Center pay lot. 

Spring trip to DC Agencies - Mar 15th 2017

Event Page and Application – Check out event page for details.

Note that this trip is primarily intended for students involved in the TISS IC CAE  program, though other students may apply.

DC AGENCY VISIT 2017 – Application- RSVP by January 20, 2017

 

Please sign on here if you are interested in participating in this trip.  We will visit the CIA, DIA, NCTC, and NGA as well as the Spy Museum.  We will leave from Chapel Hill on Sunday March 12 at 10 AM and leave from Washington DC on Tuesday March 14 at 4:30 PM.  

Transportation and lodging costs and the entrance fee to the Spy Museum will be covered by TISS. Students will be expected, however, to pay for their own meals, with the exception of breakfast.  

Seats are limited and interest is typically high.  Faculty members involved in the Intelligence and Security project on each of our four campuses will make the selection. They will give first priority to students who are seeking the TISS IC CAE Scholars Designation, or who can otherwise demonstrate their interest in the intelligence field.  They will also consider other factors (such as whether or not this is a student’s only opportunity to go on a trip like this).  Only US citizens are eligible.  

We will advise you shortly after January 20 if you have made the cut or are on the wait list.  At that time, we will collect the information we need from you for you to gain admittance to the various agencies.  We ask you to respond promptly to these requests as we need to give the agencies considerable lead time to vet visitors.

The Instantly Connected Globe: Open Source & Big Data Opportunities & Challenges for Intelligence - Feb 18th 2017

TISS IC-CAE SPRING SYMPOSIUM

Feb 17, 2017

Location: JB Duke Hotel and Conference Center, Durham, NC

The Instantly Connected Globe: Open Source, Big Data – Opportunities and Challenges for Intelligence

830-900 – Symposium Registration (coffee and snacks)

9-910 – Welcome and Opening Remarks – Tim Nichols

910-920 – (Former Student) Presentation – Tara Mooney – ISIS – A Linguistic Analysis

930-940 – (Former) Student Presentation – Jason Singh – ISIS – Strategic Center of Gravity

 

10-1100  – Panel #1 – IC CAE Student Panel – “OSINT Analysis in Practice – understanding ISIS”

Moderator: Tim Nichols

Panelist #1: Tara Mooney

Panelist #2: Jason Singh

Panelist #3: Molly Howard

 

1115-1215 Panel #2 – Open Source Contributions to Intelligence Understanding

Moderator: Dr. Sara Castro Bush

Panelist #1: Judy Johnston

Panelist #2:  Barbara Sude

Panelist #3: Ambassador David Litt

 

1215-130 Lunch and Student Poster Session

130-230 – Panel #3 – Big Data and Warning Intelligence

Moderator: Rob Johnston

Panelist #1: Cindy Storer

Panelist #2: Devin Shackle

Panelist #3: Tony Rivera

 

245-315 – Keynote Speaker – Cindy Storer

315 – Final Remarks

330 – Conclusion

Friday, February 17, 2017

Registration begins at 8:30 am

Symposium begins at 9:00 am

Conference concluded at 3:30 pm

Add to Calendar

Where

JB Duke Hotel
230 Science Drive
Chapel Hill, NC 27708


Driving Directions

Contact

Timothy Nichols and Carolyn Pumphrey
TISS IC CAE in Intelligence and Security

pumphrey@duke.edu

When the Pentagon Meets Silicon Valley, A Conversation with Chris Kirchhoff - Feb 10th 2017

“When the Pentagon Meets Silicon Valley”
A Conversation with Chris Kirchhoff

Friday, February 10th @ 1:30-2:45pm

Rhodes Conference Room (Sanford 223)

***Please fill out this quick survey to sign up for a 12-1pm lunch with Dr. Kirchhoff!***
Please join AGS, Duke Robotics, the Department of Political Science, and the Triangle Institute for Security Studies in welcoming Christopher Kirchhoff for a talk titled, “When the Pentagon Meets Silicon Valley.” Dr. Kirchhoff is currently a partner at the Defense Innovation Unit Experimental (DIUx) office within the Pentagon. He previously served as the Director for Strategic Planning at the National Security Council (NSC) and was the NSC’s lead technology strategist. Dr. Kirchhoff ran the Strategic Planning Small Group, which advises the President on trends in technology, economics, and geopolitics. He worked as a senior advisor in the White House Chief of Staff’s office and as special assistant to Chairman of the Joint Chiefs. He also authored the White House report on Big Data & Privacy, the Special Inspector General’s report on the Iraq Reconstruction experience, Hard Lessons, and edited the final report of the Space Shuttle Columbia Accident Investigation. Dr. Kirchhoff is a graduate of Harvard University and holds a doctorate in politics from Cambridge University.
Reception with hors d’oeuvres and desserts to follow in the Sanford Lobby.

Cybersecurity, Responsibility & Protecting the Homeland, A Conversation with Jane Holl Lute - Feb 13th 2017

“Cybersecurity, Responsibility & Protecting the Homeland”
A Conversation with Jane Holl Lute

Monday, February 13th @ 3:30-4:45pm

Sanford 04, Sanford School of Public Policy

Please join AGS, the Sanford School of Public Policy, the Department of Political Science, and the Triangle Institute for Security Studies in welcoming Jane Holl Lute for a talk titled, “Cybersecurity, Responsibility, and Protecting the Homeland.” Ms. Jane Holl Lute serves in the United Nations as the Special Coordinator to improve the organization’s response to sexual exploitation and abuse and concurrently as the Special Adviser to the Secretary-General on the relocation of Camp Hurriya residents outside of Iraq. Prior to re-joining the United Nations, Ms. Lute served as the Chief Executive Officer at the Center for Internet Security, an independent, not-for-profit organization established to strengthen the cybersecurity posture of public and private sector enterprises. From 2009 – 2013, Ms. Lute served as the Deputy Secretary for the United States Department of Homeland Security.

Ms. Lute served on the National Security Council staff under both President George H.W. Bush and President William Jefferson Clinton and had a distinguished career in the United States Army. She has a Ph.D. in political science from Stanford University and a J.D. from Georgetown University.

Reception with light hors d’oeuvres and refreshments to follow.

How Everything Became War and the Military Became Everything A Conversation with Rosa Brooks - Feb 24th 2017

Sanford School of Public Policy, Room 05

201 Science Drive – Durham
Events
Date/Time

Date(s) – 02/23/2017
6:30 pm – 7:45 pm

Location
Sanford School of Public Policy, Room 05

Categories No Categories

 

How Everything Became War and the Military Became Everything
A Conversation with Rosa Brooks

Please join AGS, the Department of Political Science, and the Triangle Institute for Security Studies in welcoming Rosa Brooks for a talk titled, “How Everything Became War and the Military Became Everything.” Rosa Brooks is currently a professor at Georgetown University Law Center, a columnist for Foreign Policy magazine, and a Senior Fellow at New America. From 2009-2011, Brooks served as Counselor to the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy Michele Flournoy. Brooks also founded the Office for Rule of Law and International Humanitarian Policy during her time at the Defense Department. She led a major overhaul of the Defense Department’s strategic communication and information operations efforts and is a recipient of the Secretary of Defense Medal for Outstanding Public Service. Rosa Brooks received her A.B. from Harvard, a master’s degree from Oxford, and a J.D. from Yale Law School.
This event is free and open to the public. Parking may be found in the Bryan Center pay lot.

Right Wing Extremism in America: A Conversation with Richard Cohen, President, Southern Poverty Law Center - Feb 22nd 2017

  • Right Wing Extremism in America: A Conversation with Richard Cohen, President, Southern Poverty Law Center

    Presenter:
    Richard Cohen, Southern Poverty Law Center
    Sponsors:
    Sanford School of Public Policy and Triangle Center on Terrorism and Homeland Security
    Location:
    Sanford 04 – Map
    When:
     to 
    Contact:
    Lindsley, Mary
    Email:
    mary.lindsley@duke.edu

    A graduate of Columbia University and the University of Virginia School of Law, Richard Cohen came to the SPLC in 1986 as its legal director after practicing law in Washington, D.C., for seven years. Under his guidance, the SPLC won a series of landmark lawsuits against some of the nation’s most violent white supremacist organizations. He also successfully litigated a wide variety of important civil rights actions – defending the rights of prisoners to be treated humanely, working for equal educational opportunities for all children, and bringing down the Confederate battle flag from the Alabama State Capitol. Prior to becoming SPLC president in 2003, Cohen served as its vice president for programs, which include the Intelligence Project and Teaching Tolerance.

    David Schanzer is an associate professor of the practice at the Duke Sanford School of Public Policy University and director of the Triangle Center on Terrorism and Homeland Security, a research consortium between Duke, UNC-Chapel Hill and RTI International. In these capacities, he teaches courses, conducts research and engages in public dialogue on counterterrorism strategy, counterterrorism law and homeland security. He is the lead author of a widely cited National Institute of Justice study on domestic radicalization.

    Lecture/Talk

Conversation with LtGen Stewart and Careers Fair - Mar 03rd 2017

We are working to make sure you can get to this event even if you do not have a car.

Log on here for TRANSPORTATION ARRANGEMENTS

Registration is encouraged so that we can update you, and help you with transportation.

EVENT PAGE AND REGISTRATION

Opportunities in the U.S. Intelligence Community      A Conversation with                                                                                       LtGen Vincent Stewart, Director, Defense Intelligence Agency

 

Friday, 3 March
Michaux School of Education 
North Carolina Central University
12:30 – 1:30 PM  – Keynote and Panel (Auditorium)
1:30 – 3:00 PM – Careers Fair (Lobby)

Keynote:                                                                  LtGen Vincent Stewart, USMC

Moderated Discussion:  

  • Col Melvin Carter, USMC
  • Col Dimitri Henry, USMC
  • LtCol William Wilburn, USMC
Have you ever thought about a career in the intelligence services? Don’t miss this unique opportunity to find out more about a career in the Intelligence Community from LtGen Vincent R. Stewart, USMC, Director, Defense Intelligence Agency. Recruiters will be on hand to discuss career opportunities with students from all disciplines.

Register Now! Registration is not required. However, doing so helps us in our planning. If you are a student from Duke, UNC, or NCSU planning to attend this event, we particularly encourage you to apply as it will permit us to contact you with further information about transportation arrangements. Thanks! 

Lieutenant General Vincent R. Stewart is the 20th Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency, which provides military intelligence to warfighters, defense policymakers and force planners in the Department of Defense and the Intelligence Community.  He is the first African-American and first Marine to hold this position. He formerly served as the Commander, Marine Forces Cyber.  

“Ethics & Cyber Warfare: The Quest for Responsible Security in the Age of Digital Warfare” A Conversation with George Lucas - Feb 23rd 2017

“Ethics & Cyber Warfare: The Quest for Responsible Security in the Age of Digital Warfare”
A Conversation with George Lucas

Thursday, February 23rd @ 12:30pm

Room 3041, Duke Law School

Save The Date: A Conversation with David McCormick - Mar 08th 2017

  • Wednesday, March 08, 2017
  • 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm

    Save The Date: A Conversation with David McCormick

     

    Presenter:
    David McCormick
    Sponsors:
    American Grand Strategy (AGS)Political ScienceSanford School of Public Policy, and Triangle Institute for Security Studies (TISS)
    Location:
    Sanford Fleishman Commons – Map

    “Economic Tools & American Foreign Policy in a Time of Change”
    A Conversation with David McCormick

    Wednesday, March 8 @ 4:30-5:30 pm

    Fleishman Commons, Sanford School of Public Policy

    Please join the American Grand Strategy Program, the Fuqua School of Business, the Sanford School of Public Policy and the Political Science Department for a public event featuring David McCormick titled “Economic Tools & American Foreign Policy in a Time of Change.” The talk will take place in the Fleishman Commons next Wednesday, March 8 at 4:00pm and will be followed by a reception.

    David McCormick is President and a member of the Management Committee for Bridgewater Associates, a global macro investment firm with over $150 billion in assets under management, and the world’s largest hedge fund. Before joining Bridgewater, he was U.S. Treasury Under-Secretary for International Affairs in the Bush Administration and prior to that Deputy National Security Advisor for International Economic Policy and Under Secretary of Commerce for Export Administration. From 1999-2005 David was an entrepreneur, serving as CEO of Freemarkets and President of Ariba, two publicly traded software companies, and earlier in his career he was a consultant at McKinsey & Company. David is a graduate of the US Military Academy at West Point and has a Ph.D. from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University. He is a former Army officer and a veteran of the first Gulf War.

“Cyberpowers and the New World Disorder” A Conversation with Jared Cohen - Mar 21st 2017

  • Tuesday, March 21, 2017
  • 5:00 pm – 6:15 pm

    “Cyberpowers and the New World Disorder” A Conversation with Jared Cohen

     

    Presenter:
    Jared Cohen, Google
    Sponsors:
    American Grand Strategy (AGS)Political ScienceSanford School of Public Policy, and Triangle Institute for Security Studies (TISS)
    Location:
    Sanford Fleishman Commons – Map

    “Cyberpowers in the New World Disorder”
    A Conversation with Jared Cohen

    Tuesday, March 21 @ 4:00-5:15pm

    Penn Pavilion

    Please join AGS, the Sanford School of Public Policy and the Political Science Department for a public event featuring Jared Cohen, titled “Cyberpowers in the New World Disorder”.

    Jared Cohen is the Founder and President of Jigsaw, a technology incubator at Alphabet Inc. previously known as Google Ideas. He also serves as an Advisor to Alphabet’s Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt and an Adjunct Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. Cohen is a member of the National Counterterrorism Center’s (NCTC) Director’s Advisory Board and on the board of the Tribeca Film Institute. From 2006 to 2010 he served as a member of the Secretary of State’s Policy Planning Staff and as a close advisor to both Condoleezza Rice and Hillary Clinton. Cohen has a long-standing interest in international security issues, including counter-terrorism, conflict resolution, and politics of the Middle East. He has traveled to more than 100 countries, including Iran and North Korea, and has conducted interviews with members of various extremist groups including Hezbollah, Al-Qaeda, the Taliban, Al-Shabab, Asbat al-Ansar, Somali pirates, and more recently, failed ISIS recruits. Cohen received his B.A. from Stanford University and his M.Phil in International Relations from the University of Oxford, where he studied as a Rhodes Scholar. Cohen speaks fluent Swahili and has also studied Arabic, Farsi, and Maa.

    This event will take place at the Penn Pavilion, located between the new Student Health center on Towerview Drive and the Bryan Center. This event is free and open to the public. Parking can be found for a fee at the Bryan Center parking garage.

A Conversation with Admiral Kurt Tidd - Mar 27th 2017

Staying Ahead of the Curve: Securing a Nation Amid Change - Apr 21st 2017

Sixty Days into the Trump Administration: Defense Challenges and Opportunities - Mar 20th 2017

“Sixty Days into the Trump Administration:

Defense Challenges and Opportunities”

 

Join the IDB Executive Fellows and the Triangle Institute for Security Studies for a panel discussion of the defense issues facing the new administration as it begins its tenure. Hear from retired senior military leaders as they discuss the future shape of the U.S. military, key logistical challenges, and answer your questions!

 

Monday, March 20, 2017 from 6:00-7:30pm 

Kenan Center

Kenan-Flagler Business School

University of North Carolina- Chapel Hill

Chapel Hill, NC 27514

For directions click here

Visit the Institute for Defense and Business and Triangle Institute for Security Studies online!

 

Panelists:

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General Duncan McNabb, USAF (Ret), former commander, United States Transportation Command, Scott Air Force Base, IL. USTRANSCOM is the single manager for global air, land and sea transportation for the Department of Defense.

 

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Vice Admiral Mark Harnitchek, USN (Ret), Director of Sales & Marketing for Boeing Aircraft Modernization & Sustainment (AM&S) and former Director of the Defense Logistics Agency, which is responsible for providing logistics, acquisition and technical services to the U.S. military services and other federal agencies.

 

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Rear Admiral Richard Gromlich, USCG (Ret), former Commander, Coast Guard 13th District in Seattle, WA where he was responsible for all Coast Guard operations throughout the Pacific.

 

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Mr. Donald Tison, SES, USA (Ret), former Assistant Deputy Chief of Staff, G-8, responsible for Army Programs, Force Development, Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR), Army Studies Management, and the Center for Army Analysis (CAA).

Duke-UNC China Leadership Summit 2017 “China as a Responsible Stakeholder” - Apr 10th 2017

Picture

2017
CONFERENCE
​THEME

Picture

CHINA AS A
RESPONSIBLE
STAKEHOLDER


WHEN: APRIL 7-9TH, 2017
WHERE: DUKE UNIVERSITY & UNC-CHAPEL HILL


APPLICATION TIMELINE

External Applications Due (Non-Duke/UNC applicants): February 11, 2017
Duke & UNC Applications Due: March 8, 2017

DELEGATE EXPERIENCE

CLS brings together 100 of the most promising undergraduates from around China and the U.S. who are interested in deepening their understanding of China and creating a more productive relationship between the U.S. and China. As a delegate, you will attend panels, roundtable discussions, seminars and keynote speeches led by professionals committed to the U.S.-China relationship in various fields including academia, business, government, and social activism. You will have the chance to discuss some of the most pressing issues pertaining to Sino-U.S. relations with your peers as well as network with our speakers, corporate sponsors and each other.

Duke-UNC China Leadership Summit 2017
“China as a Responsible Stakeholder”

Friday-Sunday, April 7-9

Duke University / UNC-Chapel Hill

Are you passionate about China or US-China relations and looking for an incredible networking opportunity? Apply to be a delegate at the 2017 Duke-UNC China Leadership Summit from April 7-9! Now in its seventh year, CLS brings together 100 of the most promising undergraduates from across China and the U.S.. Delegates will attend panels, roundtable discussions, interactive seminars and keynote speeches led by prominent experts committed to the U.S.-China relationship in fields of academia, business, government, and social activism.

Speakers this year include Joseph NyeThomas ChristensenKaiser Kuo, and our very own Melanie Manion! Delegates will also have the unique opportunity to participate in formal networking sessions and student research presentations.

Applications are due on March 8th, 2017**To apply, click here or visit our website at www.dukeunccls.com.**

Camouflaged Etiquette: Gender and Standards of Behavior in the U.S. Military, 1960-1980 - Mar 23rd 2017

Thursday, 23 March 2017

5:30 – 7:00 PM • UNC Chapel Hill • Hamilton Hall 569

HANNAH ONTIVEROS

(Duke University, Department of History)

Camouflaged Etiquette: Gender and Standards of Behavior in the U.S. Military, 1960-1980

In cooperation with the UNC Chapel Hill Curriculum in Peace, War and Defense

 

For more information, click here

For a PDF of the Spring 2017 Program click here

CO-CONVERERS: Carolina Seminars • Triangle Institute for Security Studies • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: Center for European Studies • Curriculum in Peace, War and Defense • Department of History • Center for European Studies • Department of Women’s and Gender Studies • Duke University: Department of History • Program in American Grand Strategy

Friday, 21 April 2017  •  11:30 AM – 1:30 PM  •  UNC Chapel Hill, Hamilton Hall 569
Graduate Luncheon Seminar “Digital Mapping in Historical Research and Teaching” withSTEPHEN ROBERTSON (George Mason University)
For more information, click here  •   To register please click here

Islamic State, Women and Violence - Apr 20th 2017

Thursday, 20 April 2017
5:30–7:00 pm • UNC Chapel Hill • Hamilton Hall 569

MIRIAM COOKE

Duke University • Department of History Islamic State, Women and Violence

Miriam Cooke is Braxton Craven Distinguished Professor of Arab Cultures at Duke University. She has written about Arab cultural studies with a concentration on Syria and the Arab Gulf. She is the author of several monographs that include Women and the War Story (1996); Dissident Syria: Making Oppositional Arts Official (2007); Tribal Modern: Branding New Nations in The Arab Gulf (2014) and most recently Dancing in Damascus: Creativity, Resilience and the Syrian Revolution (2016).

In cooperation with: Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations

CONVENERS: Carolina Seminars • Triangle Institute for Security Studies • UNC Chapel Hill (Center for European Studies • Curriculum in Peace, War and Defense • Dept. of History • Center for European Studies • Dept. of Women’s and Gender Studies) • Duke University (Dept. of History • Program in American Grand Strategy) • ORGANIZER: Karen Hagemann (UNC Chapel Hill, Dept. of History)

The Bolger Lectures 2017 – Who is the Enemy in the Middle East - Mar 23rd 2017

Former U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel will join retired Army lieutenant general Dan Bolger, a teaching assistant professor in NC State’s Department of History, to discuss the ongoing conflicts in the Middle East.

Chuck Hagel served as Secretary of Defense from 2013 – 2015 in the Obama administration. He served as a U.S. Senator from Nebraska from 1997 – 2009. He is the former chairman of the Atlantic Council; served on the President’s Intelligence Advisory Board (2009–2012); was a Distinguished Professor at Georgetown University; and co-founded Vanguard Cellular Systems, Inc. He served in Vietnam alongside his brother Tom in 1968, where they were infantry squad leaders with the U.S. Army’s 9th Infantry Division. Chuck Hagel earned many military decorations and honors, including two Purple Hearts.

Dan Bolger served for 35 years in the U.S. Army, earning five Bronze Star Medals (one for valor) and the Combat Action Badge. His notable military commands included serving as Commanding General of the Combined Security Transition Command in Afghanistan and Commander of the NATO Training Mission in Afghanistan (2011-2013); Commanding General of the 1st Cavalry Division at Fort Hood, TX (deployed to Baghdad, 2009-2010); the Coalition Military Assistance Training Team in Iraq (2005–06); and U.S. Army Assistant Chief of Staff for Operations. He is the author of several books, including Why We Lost:  A General’s Inside Account of the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars (New York:  Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2015).

Photo of Chuck Hagel. Credit: U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Vladimir Ramos/Released.  Shared under a Creative Commons license. 

Details

Date:
March 23 
Time:
6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Event Categories:
Humanities and Social Sciences, SPIA

The Geospatial World - Mar 31st 2017

The Geospatial World

Geographic information and analysis is critical to security studies. Analysts trained in the use of geospatial methods and applications are needed to inform decision makers.  In this panel, learn the historical relationship between geography and security, how geographic information systems software is used to build forecasting models to aid intelligence, and all of the geographic information resources available to UNC students. 

Joe Caddell, historian and director of the Triangle Institute for Security Studies Intelligence Center for Academic Intelligence in Intelligence and Security Studies, will provide a brief overview of the evolving relationship between geography and security/intelligence.  Jon Breece, Senior geospatial analyst, will present how the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency’s (NGA) Office of Sciences and Methodologies is leveraging ecological modeling, operations research, epidemiological, and data mining literature to build forecasting models for outcomes of interest to defense and intelligence analysts. Learn how GIS software enables more efficient curation and preparation of disparate and unique datasets to execute statistical analyses. Philip McDaniel, GIS Librarian at the Davis Library Research Hub, will provide an overview of the GIS resources available at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  He will discuss software, data, instruction, and services available to UNC students to help them get started with geospatial training.  

  •  Joe Caddell, Director of TISS IC CAE in Intelligence and Security Studies
  • Lecturer in History, UNC-Chapel Hill
  • Professor Intelligence of the National Intelligence University
  • “Geography and Security – An historical overview”
  • Jon Breece, Senior geospatial analyst
  • NGA/Office of Sciences and Methodologies
  • “GIS – Applied Predictive Analysis”
  • Philip McDaniel, GIS Librarian
  • Digital Research Services, UNC-Chapel Hill
  • “GIS Resources, Services, and Opportunities at UNC”

TISS IC CAE Annual Careers Forum - Mar 25th 2017

2017 Careers Forum

Please join us for an enjoyable and instructive evening. Eight alums will provide you with insights into life after graduation. They are graduates of both UNC and Duke and have been out in the “real world” from anywhere between one to thirteen years.  They represent  government agencies, a think tank, graduate school, a defense contracting company, and the legal profession.  They will discuss the range of career opportunities available to those who have focused on security studies, provide guidance as to avenues to pursue, and entertain with stories drawn from their own experience.  

 

Friday, March 24 Student Union Room 2420

Panel Discussion:  5:30 – 6:45 PM. 

Reception:  6:45-8:00 PM

Register Now!

Please help us estimate how much food and drink to order by signing on above! Thank you.

Current Challenges & Opportunities for the U.S. Military in the Caribbean, Central & South America - Mar 27th 2017

“Current Challenges & Opportunities for the U.S. Military in the Caribbean, Central & South America”
A Conversation with ADM Kurt Tidd & GEN (R) Martin Dempsey
Commander, USSOUTHCOM & Former Chairman of the JCS

Monday, March 27th @ 6:00-7:15pm

Fleishman Commons, Sanford School of Public Policy

***Click here to sign-up for a 12:00-1:15pm lunch with ADM Tidd***

***Click here to sign-up for dinner with ADM Tidd & GEN Dempsey***Please join the Duke Program in American Grand Strategy, the Triangle Institute for Security Studies, the Sanford School of Public Policy, and the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies for a public talk with Admiral Kurt Tidd and General (Ret.) Martin Dempsey titled, “Current Challenges and Opportunities for the U.S. Military in the Caribbean, Central, and South America”.

ADM Kurt W. Tidd is the current commander of United States Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM). Previously, ADM Tidd commanded U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and the U.S. 4th Fleet. In support of coalition forces in Operation Enduring Freedom, ADM Tidd commanded Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 8 aboard USS Dwight D. Eisenhower. In addition to his extensive experience at sea, ADM Tidd served as the assistant to the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. He spent three years on the National Security Council as director for Strategic Capabilities Policy and as director for Combating Terrorism. ADM Tidd was the assistant chief of staff for Operations at U.S. Naval Forces Central Command/U.S. 5th Fleet, Manama, Bahrain. ADM Tidd was the strategic planner on the Chief of Naval Operations’ Executive Panel and was aide to the U.S. representative to the NATO military committee.

ADM Tidd graduated from Porter-Gaud School and was commissioned from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1978. Tidd is a French linguist with a master’s degree in political science from the University of Bordeaux, France. He is a graduate of the Armed Forces Staff College and was a Federal Executive fellow at the Atlantic Council of the United States. Tidd was awarded the Legion of Honor by the government of France. He also holds various decorations and awards, including two Defense Distinguished Service Medals, the Navy Distinguished Service Medal, the Defense Superior Service Medal and four awards of the Legion of Merit.

This event is free and open to the public. Parking can be found in the Bryan Center parking lot for a small fee.

Islamic State, Women and Violence - Mar 30th 2017

Islamic State, Women and Violence

March 30 @ 5:30 pm7:30 pm UTC-5

Speaker, Miriam Cooke, is a Braxton Craven Professor of Arab Cultures in the Department of History at Duke University. Cemil Ayden of the Department of History at UNC Chapel Hill will be moderating the talk.

This event is part of the Carolina Gender, War and Culture Studies Series (CGWC) and held in collaboration with the Curriculum in Peace, War and Defense of UNC Chapel Hill and The Carolina Center for the study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations.

Details

Date:
March 30
Time:
5:30 pm – 7:30 pm

Venue

Hamilton Hall Room 569, UNC-CH Campus
102 Emerson Drive
Chapel Hill , 27599
+ Google Map

Careers in Foreign Policy & National Security - Apr 04th 2017

Careers in Foreign Policy & National Security

AN AGS Alumni Career Panel

Tuesday, April 4th @ 5:45-7:00pm

Sanford 201, Sanford School of Public Policy

Please join the American Grand Strategy program for the annual alumni career panel featuring Tyler Duke, Olivia Wasteneys, and Ella Lipin.

Tyler Duke (MPP ’16) is a Senior Associate at Beacon Global Strategies, a strategic advisory firm specializing in international policy, defense, cyber, intelligence, and homeland security based in Washington DC. Before joining BGS, Mr. Duke was the research assistant and speechwriter for General Stan McChrystal (ret.) at the McChrystal Group, LLC. From April 2012 to June 2013, Mr. Duke served as an Army Civilian intelligence advisory for the U.S. Army in Kandahar, Afghanistan. Mr. Duke has also served in the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) on four separate occasions.

Olivia Wasteneys (T’14) is a Senior Consulting Analyst at Avascent, where she supports clients in private equity, at Fortune 500 companies, and at NASA on strategic growth, M&A, organizational design, and capture engagements. She specializes in military space, commercial satellite communications, human spaceflight and commercial remote sensing. Prior to joining Avascent, Olivia served as an English Teacher with the Fulbright US Student Program in Turkey.

Ella Lipin (T’10) was an appointee in the Obama administration serving as the Egypt Country Director in the Office of the Undersecretary of Defense for Policy. Previously Ella worked at the Council on Foreign Relations, where she focused on the Middle East. Ella is now at the Cohen Group.

The career panel is a great opportunity for undergraduate and graduate students to network, ask questions, and learn how to navigate the job search in Washington DC.

The Counterterrorism & Public Policy Fellowship Research Conference - Apr 08th 2017

The Counterterrorism & Public Policy Fellowship Research Conference

Friday, April 7th @ 9:30am-3:00pm

Sanford 223, Rhodes Conference Room

Featuring:
  • COL Wes MacMullen, “Improving Public-Private Partnerships”
  • CDR Jay Sego, “The U.S. Military Four-Star Confirmation Process: Effectiveness & Efficiency
  • COL Chris Black, “Political Warfare: Lessons from the Cold War”
  • LTC Joe Wortham, “Challenges to Stability Assistance in Rojava: a U.S. Policy Option”
  • LTC Matt Weinshel, “FAA: an Undervalued Combat Multiplier”
Contact Katy Fanning at katy.fanning@duke.edu for more information

Deterrence & Dissuasion in Cyberspace: Russia, China & the U.S. - Apr 07th 2017

“Deterrence & Dissuasion in Cyberspace: Russia, China & the U.S.”

A Conversation with Dr. Joe S. Nye

Friday, April 7th @ 5:30-6:30pm

Sanford 04, Sanford School of Public Policy

Please join the American Grand Strategy Program in welcoming Joseph S. Nye, Jr. for a talk titled “Deterrence & Dissuasion in Cyberspace: Russia, China & the U.S.”

Dr. Nye is University Distinguished Service Professor and former Dean of the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He received his bachelor’s degree summa cum laude from Princeton University, studied at Oxford University on a Rhodes Scholarship, and earned a Ph.D. in political science from Harvard where he joined the faculty in 1964. In 2008, a poll of 2700 international relations scholars listed him as the most influential scholar on American foreign policy, and in 2011 Foreign Policy listed him among the 100 leading global thinkers.

From 1977-79, Nye was a deputy Undersecretary of State and chaired the National Security Council Group on Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons. In 1993-94 he chaired the National Intelligence Council which prepares intelligence estimates for the president, and in 1994-95 served as Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs. He won Distinguished Service medals from all three agencies.
Nye has published fourteen academic books, a novel, and more than 150 articles in professional and policy journals. Recent books include Soft Power, The Powers to Lead, The Future of Power, and Is the American Century Over?

This talk is free and open to the public, and parking can be found in the Science Drive/Cameron Boulevard Lot for a fee.

Staying Ahead of the Curve: Securing a Nation Amid Change – A Conversation with General (Ret.) Keith Alexander - Apr 24th 2017

“Staying Ahead of the Curve: Securing a Nation Amid Change”

A Conversation with General Keith Alexander, USA (Ret.)

Friday, April 24 @ 5:30-6:30pm

Gross Hall 107, Ahmadieh Family Auditorium

General Keith B. Alexander, former commander of U.S. Cyber Command and former director of the National Security Agency (NSA), will speak at Duke University on Friday, April 21. The free, public talk, “Staying Ahead of the Curve: Securing a Nation Amid Change,” takes place at 5:30 p.m. in the Gross Hall Auditorium. The talk is part of a new speaker series at Duke on the challenges of global governance, funded by the Ambassador Dave and Kay Phillips Family International Lectureship.

As commander of U.S. Cyber Command from 2010-2014, Alexander was responsible for planning, coordinating and conducting operations and defending Department of Defense computer networks. He also oversaw the defending of the nation against cyber-attacks. As director of the NSA from 2005-2014, his responsibilities included military combat support and protecting the U.S. national security information system. Now CEO and president of IronNet Cybersecurity, Alexander provides strategic vision to corporate leaders on cybersecurity issues through development of cutting-edge technology, consulting and education/training.

Alexander’s talk is hosted by the Duke University Center for International and Global Studies, and the Duke University Program in American Grand StrategyEvent location and parking information: Gross Hall is located at 140 Science Drive (at the northwest corner of Science Drive and Towerview Road).  For a map to the event location, please click here. Free parking is available in the Chemistry parking lot for all guests.  For directions and a map to the parking lot, please click here.

Lethal Aid and Human Security: Exploring the Impact of Military Assistance to Fragile States and Nonstate Actors - Jun 22nd 2017

Lethal Aid and Human Security: Exploring the Impact of Military Assistance to Fragile States and Nonstate Actors

 

Thursday June 22, 5 pm

Gerrard Hall, 226 East Cameron Ave, UNC at Chapel Hill

 

Free and open to the public.

 

Security assistance–providing weapons, training, advising, and other forms of assistance to foreign government and non-state armed forces–is playing an increasing role in US security strategy. How does the provision of military assistance impact governance, human security, and peacebuilding in fragile states? What steps can donor states take to prevent the misuse or diversion of their weapons transfers and lessen adverse impacts on societal welfare?

 

Colonel Carl Kelly, Dr. Rachel Kleinfeld, and Matt Schroeder will address these and other issues in a conversation moderated by Dr. Patricia Sullivan, professor of Public Policy and Peace, War, and Defense at UNC-Chapel Hill.

 

For more information: humansecuritycollaboration.web.unc.edu

The Geopolitics of Cheap Oil - Feb 25th 2016

The Geopolitics of Cheap Oil with Emily Meierding

Emily Meierding will be joining the faculty of the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California, in July 2016. Previously, she taught at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva, Switzerland and was a Zukerman Fellow at the Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC) at Stanford University. She received her Ph.D. in political science from the University of Chicago. She has published in multiple outlets about the intersection of energy and human and national security, including the myth of “oil wars,” international joint development of cross-border oil and gas reserves, and energy and development. She currently is completing work on a book manuscript provisionally entitled Oil, Territory, and War.

Papers Due for Conflict, Cooperation, and Change in the Politics of Energy Interdependence - Jun 02nd 2016

Papers due for Peer Review on Conflict, Cooperation, and Change in the Politics of Energy Interdependence

Underestimated: Our Not So Peaceful Nuclear Future - Sep 25th 2015

Underestimated: Our Not So Peaceful Nuclear Future with Henry D. Sokolski

With the world focused on Iran, it is tempting to think that addressing this case, North Korea, and the problem of nuclear terrorism is all that matters and is what matters most. Perhaps, but if states become more willing to use their nuclear weapons to achieve military advantage, our security could be held hostage not just by Pyongyang, Tehran, and terrorists, but to nuclear proliferation, miscalculation, and wars between a much larger number of possible players. This, in a nutshell, is the premise of Henry Sokolski’s new book, Underestimated: Our Not So Peaceful Nuclear Future, which explores what we may be up against in the next few decades and how we think about this future. The book has already received favorable reviews in SURVIVAL and critical praise from Ambassador Robert Gallucci, Eric Schlosser (Command and Control), former Office of Net Assessment director Andrew Marshall, and professor Robert Jervis (Columbia University).

 

The Century-Old Origins of Today’s Food Safety Debates - Jan 28th 2015

With Matthew Booker, Department of History

Much of the regulatory apparatus around food safety in the United States derives from a burst of legislation in the early 20th century. Why did issues of food safety emerge as a social problem when they did? And how do the concerns of a century ago inform food anxieties today? This is a work in progress, but I will share early results from research into technologies of food safety and food purity.

Russian Resource Nationalism in the ‘Taiga’ - Mar 16th 2015

With Ion A. Iftimie   Flyer

On the Eurasian plateau the power of the Kremlin is back, primarily because of Russia’s geostrategic use of natural resources, a strategy of “resource nationalism” that Putin endorsed in his doctoral dissertation. Over 100 years ago, Sir Halford John Mackinder warned about the danger of letting Russia use its “vast continental resources” to control Central and Eastern Europe, or “the taiga”: “who rules East Europe commands the Heartland; who rules the Heartland commands the World-Island; who rules the World-Island controls the world.” In October 2014, just months after the annexation of the Crimean Peninsula by the Russian Federation, Russian President Vladimir Putin threatened the West that “the bear [is the] master of the taiga, and [it] will not let anyone have its taiga.” This talk consdiers the implications for NATO and the European Union.

Laws of Nature - Mar 19th 2015

With John Carroll, Department of Philosophy

Do laws of nature govern the universe? Or are they mere summaries of what happens in the universe? After a review of some recent philosophical accounts, Carroll will sketch a view on which laws of nature do govern, and do so in virtue of being generalizations caused by nature.

Major Contributions of Early Women Plant Pathologists… - Feb 19th 2015

With Jean Ristaino, Department of Plant Pathology

Ristaino will discuss her edited book, Pioneering Women in Plant Pathology. It is a biographical book on the early women scientists who led the way for others in the field of plant pathology. With contributions from 37 talented writers and more than 130 figures, readers are given a true picture of the challenges these women faced on their way to important scientific discoveries. She will discuss the obstacles that women faced, the strategies these women used for success, and their scientific contributions.

Global Nuclear Security Workshop - Oct 12th 2014

By Invitation Only

Renewable Energy, Energy Security, and Cyber Security - Jan 28th 2015

Register Here

Public Perceptions of Genetic Engineering Technologies - Mar 05th 2015

With Andrew Binder, Department of Communication

This presentation will focus on preliminary results from a larger meta-synthesis and -analysis of published research on public perceptions of genetic engineering. These include outlining the dominant foci of such research (such as agricultural biotechnology), as well as areas where more social science research is needed (such as genetically engineered animals). Results will also describe the nature and robustness of important relationships such as those between trust in science, scientific literacy, and opinions on genetic engineering.

NCSU Reactor Tour - Sep 12th 2014

By Invitation Only

Abstracts Due for Conflict, Cooperation, and Change in the Politics of Energy Interdependence - Mar 22nd 2016

Abstracts Due for Conflict, Cooperation, and Change in the Politics of Energy Interdependence

Please send to Dr. Mark Nance at mtnance@ncsu.edu

Luncheon with Dr. Richard T. Cupitt - Mar 15th 2017

Lecture: Preventing WMD Proliferation & WMD Terrorism–Next Steps for UNSCR after the 2nd Comprehensive Review

Luncheon served

Please click here for more details.

PWAD Luncheon – Chinese nuclear doctrine, weapons, and policies - Oct 21st 2014

Limited to the first 75 people

Kim Jong-Un and North Korean Nuclear Policy - Jul 01st 2014

Speaker: Lawrence Grinter,  Air War College

Iran’s Nuclear Program: Issues and Next Steps - Feb 02nd 2015

View the Flyer (MS Word)

Electrochemical Technologies Unleashed: Energy Recovery from Clean and Dirty Water - Apr 27th 2015

Electrochemical Technologies Unleashed: Energy Recovery from Clean and Dirty Water with Dr. Douglas F. Call

Electrochemical technologies are emerging as key players to generate electricity and store energy. Conventional systems include fuel cells powered by gaseous fuels and batteries used in everything from cell phones to automobiles. There are several “unconventional” electrochemical technologies that can use wastewater or fresh/saline waters as fuel sources. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are an “unconventional” electrochemical technology that generate electricity when bacteria degrade wastewater organics and transfer electrons to anode electrodes. When these electrons react at a second electrode in the presence of oxygen, the final product is water. Another largely untapped energy resource is the chemical energy available in freshwater-seawater gradients. Mixing one cubic meter of freshwater (the volume of six oil barrels) into the ocean releases energy equivalent to the same volume of water falling from a height of nearly 1,000 feet. Reverse electrodialysis (RED) generates electricity when solutions of different salinities are separated by multiple membranes that allow only ions (e.g. sodium and chloride), and not water, to pass through them. The flow of ions through the membranes to even out the salinity gradients is converted into electricity at two terminal electrodes. Dr. Call will discuss recent efforts to scale-up MFCs for wastewater treatment and introduce a newly formed UNC-system collaboration to develop and assess RED potential in North Carolina.

Corie Walsh – NGOs: The Other Three Letter Agencies - Sep 28th 2017

TISS ICCAE and PWAD are proud to invite you to enjoy a luncheon discussion with UNC alum Corie Walsh.  Because we are providing food, please RSVP here : Corie Walsh Event Page.
Corie Walsh,  a graduate of the University of North Carolina with a dual degree in Peace, War, & Defense and Global Studies, works for Mercy Corps, one of the largest American humanitarian and development organizations.  On this occasion, she will discuss her career in International NGOs and her current role at the development organization Mercy Corps. She will discuss how PWAD helped her career, why she chose this route, the work that Mercy Corps does, and how the skills you develop as a PWAD student can prepare you for a career in this field.

A Conversation with John E. McLaughlin, former Acting Director of Central Intelligence - Sep 14th 2017

Join us for a Conversation between John McLaughlin and Peter Feaver at the Carolina Union on September 14th.  Doors will open at 5:30 PM. The event will begin at 6:00 pm.

It is free and open to the public.  Registration is not required, though if you do sign on,  we can send you reminders and updates. To register go to Event Page (see below)

Mr. John E. McLaughlin served as an Acting Director of Central Intelligence. He worked for nearly 30 years at the CIA. Early in his career, he focused on European, Russian, and Eurasian issues in the Directorate of Intelligence. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, he served as director of the Office of European Analysis and director of the Office of Slavic and Eurasian Analysis. He is currently the Distinguished Practitioner-in-Residence
Johns Hopkins University Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS).

Emerging Global Threats: Effects of Climate Change on US Military Operations at Home and Abroad - Aug 24th 2017

 

On August 23rd at 7:00pm please join the NC Museum of Natural Sciences, American Security Project, and the Triangle Center on Terrorism and Homeland Security at Duke University for a fireside chat on Emerging Global Threats: Effects of Climate Change on US Military Operations at Home and Abroad. WRAL’s Greg Fishel will moderate a discussion and public Q & A with Dr. David W Titley, Rear Admiral USN (ret.), and Brigadier General Stephen Cheney, USMC (ret.) on how the U.S. military is preparing to deal with climate disruption and what that means for both our national and global security.

 

The US military recognizes the effects of climate disruption are an “accelerant of instability,” which exacerbates security threats around the world. More frequent extreme weather events, food scarcity, water insecurity, and sea level rise will destabilize societies especially in countries where governments are not prepared to deal with the threats.  How countries respond to increased instability will determine whether climate change will lead to war.

 

North Carolina is home to a number of combat units who are often the first to deploy in crisis and conflict. As a result, our military families and communities will be some of the first to feel the effects of climate change as US troops are deployed in response to disasters and conflicts

exacerbated by climate change.

 

The Details:

 

What: Emerging Global Threats: Effects of Climate Change on US Military Operations at Home and Abroad.

When: August 23rd, 7:00pm8:30pm

 

Where: WRAL 3D Theater, NC Museum of Natural Sciences, 11 West Jones Street Raleigh, NC 27601

To RSVP, visit http://bit.ly/2hlbKz6

Is America Leading, Retreating or Getting Out of the Way? A Conversation with Jim Carafano - Sep 06th 2017

Is America Leading, Retreating or Getting Out of the Way? A Conversation with Jim Carafano

Wednesday, September 6 @ 5:30pm

Sanford School of Public Policy, Room TBA

Click here to RSVP for Dinner following the event
*Please note that your participation in the dinner is not finalized until you receive a confirmation email.

James Jay Carafano, a leading expert in national security and foreign policy challenges, is The Heritage Foundation’s Vice President, Foreign and Defense Policy Studies, E. W. Richardson Fellow, and Director of the Kathryn and Shelby Cullom Davis Institute for International Studies.

His recent research has focused on developing the national security required to secure the long-term interests of the United States — protecting the public, providing for economic growth and preserving civil liberties.

Destined for War: Can America and China Escape Thucydides’s Trap? Lunch with Graham Allison - Sep 13th 2017

Destined for War: Can America and China Escape Thucydides’s Trap?
Lunch with Graham Allison

Wednesday, September 13 @ 12:00pm

Gross Hall Room 270
Click Here to RSVP for Lunch


Join the Political Science Department and AGS for a lunch with Graham Allison to discuss his latest book, Destined for War: Can America and China Escape Thucydides’s Trap?.

Graham Allison was Director of Harvard’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs from 1995 until July 2017. Allison is a leading analyst of U.S. national security and defense policy with a special interest in nuclear weapons, terrorism and decision-making. As Assistant Secretary of Defense in the first Clinton Administration, Dr. Allison received the Defense Department’s highest civilian award, the Defense Medal for Distinguished Public Service, for “reshaping relations with Russia, Ukraine, Belarus and Kazakhstan to reduce the former Soviet nuclear arsenal.”

Dr. Allison has served as Special Advisor to the Secretary of Defense under President Reagan.  He has the sole distinction of having twice been awarded the Department of Defense’s highest civilian award, the Distinguished Public Service Medal, first by Secretary Cap Weinberger and second by Secretary Bill Perry.  He served as a member of the Defense Policy Board for Secretaries Weinberger, Carlucci, Cheney, Aspin, Perry, Cohen and Carter.  He currently serves on the Advisory boards of the Secretary of State, Secretary of Defense, and the Director of the CIA.

Counterterrorism in the Trump Era: A Conversation with Lisa Monaco - Sep 13th 2017

Counterterrorism in the Trump Era: A Conversation with Lisa Monaco

Wednesday, September 13 @ 6:00 – 7:15pm

Sanford School of Public Policy – Fleishman Commons

Click Here to RSVP for Dinner with Lisa after the Event
*Please note that your participation in the dinner is not finalized until you receive a confirmation email.

Please join the Triangle Center on Terrorism and Homeland Security, the Duke Program in American Grand Strategy, the Triangle Institute for Security Studies and the Sanford School of Public Policy for a public talk with Lisa Monaco on “Counterterrorism in the Trump Era.”

Lisa O. Monaco served as Assistant to the President for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism during the Obama Administration.  She was responsible for advising the President on all aspects of counterterrorism policy and strategy, in addition to coordinating homeland security-related activities throughout the Executive Branch.

Prior to the White House, Monaco spent 15 years at the Department of Justice, the majority of that time serving as a career federal prosecutor, and in senior management positions in the Justice Department and the FBI.   She served for three years as counsel to the Chief of Staff at the FBI, helping then Director Robert S. Mueller III transform the FBI after 9/11 into a national security organization focused on preventing terrorist attacks on the United States. In 2011, she was nominated by the President and confirmed by the United States Senate to serve as Assistant Attorney General for National Security, the first woman to serve in that position.  In this role, she led the Justice Department’s National Security Division (NSD) which was created after the attacks of September 11, 2001, in order to integrate intelligence and law enforcement functions across the Justice Department.

Eighteenth Annual New Faces Conference - Sep 08th 2017

At this conference, six advanced graduate students working in the security studies field will present their research to an interdisciplinary audience.

Topics include:
•tReligiosity and Bellicosity: The Impact of Religious Commitment on Interstate Conflict
•tGrand Strategic Crucibles: The Lasting Effects of Military Intervention on State Strategy
•t“He Should Follow a Course of Obedience:” American War Criminals and the Superior Orders Defense in the Second World War
•tStraddling the Threshold of Two Worlds: Soldiers’ Culture in the U.S. Army, 1965-1975
•tMore Talk, Less Action: Why Costless Diplomacy Works During Power Transition
•tExperiments in Peace: Asian Neutralism, Human Rights, and the Transformation of the United Nations, 1946-1966

Human Rights and Anti-Semitism in the Current Climate - Sep 12th 2017

Mr. Kenneth L. Marcus is the founding President of the Louis D. Brandeis Center for Human Rights Under Law and author of “The Definition of Anti-Semitism and Jewish Identity in Civil Rights in America.”

He has also served as Staff Director at the United States Commission on Civil Rights and was delegated the authority of Assistant Secretary of Education for Civil Rights and Assistant Secretary of Housing and Urban Development for Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity. He also previously held the Lillie and Nathan Ackerman Chair in Equality and Justice in America at CUNY Baruch’s School of Public Affairs.

The Usefulness of Useless Knowledge - Sep 14th 2017

Robbert Dijkgraaf
Director, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton

Counterterrorism in the Trump Era: A Conversation with Lisa Monaco - Sep 13th 2017

Lisa O. Monaco, President Obama’s chief counterterrorism and homeland security advisor for his entire second term, will speak at Duke on Wednesday, September 13. As the former Assistant to the President for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism, she was responsible for policy coordination and crisis management on issues ranging from cybersecurity and natural disasters – Russian hacking of the election and the Ebola crisis – to terrorist attacks at home and abroad

Conversation with John McLaughlin, former Acting Director of Central Intelligence - Sep 14th 2017

John E. McLaughlin is a distinguished practitioner in residence at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies. He served as the Deputy Director of the Central Intelligence Agency from 2000-2004 and Acting Director of the CIA in 2004. His career at the CIA spanned nearly 30 years. Early in his career, he focused on European, Russian, and Eurasian issues in the Directorate of Intelligence. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, he served as director of the Office of European Analysis and director of the Office of Slavic and Eurasian Analysis.

IC CAE Informational Meeting - Sep 15th 2017

Want to know more about intelligence courses and programs available to students through the TISS ICCAE? Want to know about opportunities for funding and professional development? Want to know how to become a TISS ICCAE Scholar? Heard about how much fun it is to participate in simulations and want to become involved this year? If so, don’t miss the information session on 15 September. All interested students are welcome.

Dr. Joe Caddell, Director of the TISS ICCAE will host. We are also delighted to introduce David Walton, College of International Security Affairs, National Defense University (NDU), Fort Bragg. Dr. Walton will brief students about this year’s simulation, which we will be holding in conjunction with students from NDU. Our students will be involved in both the design of the simulation and the exercise itself.

Are the U.S. and China Destined for War? - Sep 13th 2017

Professor Allison is a distinguished scholar of U.S. national security and defense policy. The Douglas Dillon Professor of Government and founding dean of Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, he is former director of Harvard’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs. He currently serves on the advisory boards of both the secretaries of state and defense and of the director of the CIA, and he is a former member of the Defense Policy Board under seven secretaries of defense during both Republican and Democratic presidencies. He also has served as Special Advisor to the Secretary of Defense under President Reagan and Assistant Secretary of Defense for Policy and Plans under President Clinton, and was awarded the Defense Department’s highest civilian award, the Defense Medal for Distinguished Public Service, for “reshaping relations with Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan to reduce the former Soviet nuclear arsenal.”

US Leadership in a Changing World: A Conversation with Avril Haines - Sep 25th 2017

US Leadership in a Changing World:
A Conversation with Avril Haines

Monday, September 25 @ 5:30-6:45pm

Sanford School of Public Policy – Room 05
Click Here to RSVP for Dinner after the event
*Please note that your participation in the dinner is not finalized until you receive a confirmation email.

Avril D. Haines most recently served as Deputy National Security Advisor to President Obama.  Just prior, she was the Deputy Director of the Central Intelligence Agency, and before that she served as the Legal Adviser to the National Security Council.  Before joining the NSC, she led the Treaty office at the Department of State, was the Deputy Chief Counsel for the United States Senate Committee on Foreign Relations, worked for the The Hague Conference on Private International Law, and served as a law clerk for Judge Danny Boggs on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit.  Avril received a bachelor’s degree in Physics from the University of Chicago, a law degree from Georgetown University Law Center, and founded and ran a bookstore café for five years in Baltimore.
partment.

Politics, Media & the Current State of Affairs: Lunch with Professor Megan McArdle - Oct 04th 2017

Politics, Media & the Current State of Affairs:
Lunch with Professor Megan McArdle

Wednesday, October 4 @ 12:00pm

Sanford School 201

RSVP for Lunch here

 

Megan McArdle, this year’s visiting Egan Professor at the Sanford School, is a columnist at Bloomberg View.  This semester she is teaching an opinion writing course, Op-Ed Persuasive Writing,  as part of the DeWitt Wallace Center’s policy journalism program.

McArdle writes about business, economics and public policy. She has been praised by New York Times columnist David Brooks for being “one of the most influential bloggers on the right.”

After starting the blog Live From the WTC in 2001 — which focused on economics and business in a post-9/11 world — McArdle was brought on as a contributor for The Economist, where she wrote about similar topics and helped establish the magazine’s economics blog, Free Exchange.  McArdle also has worked for Newsweek, The Daily Beast and The Atlantic, and contributed to the New York Post and The Guardian, among other outlets. She authored the 2014 book The Up Side of Down: Why Failing Well Is the Key to Success.

The Reformation at 500: The Forgotten Key to America’s Crisis of Freedom: A Conversation with Os Guinness - Oct 12th 2017

The Reformation at 500: The Forgotten Key to America’s Crisis of Freedom: A Conversation with Os Guinness

Thursday, October 12 @ 5:30pm

Penn Pavilion

to RSVP for Dinner click here


In partnership with the Center for Christianity and Scholarship, please join AGS to welcome Os Guinness, author and social critic. Great-great-great grandson of Arthur Guinness, the Dublin brewer, he was born in China in World War Two where his parents were medical missionaries. A witness to the climax of the Chinese revolution in 1949, he was expelled with many other foreigners in 1951 and returned to Europe where he was educated in England.

Before moving to the United States in 1984, Os was a freelance reporter with the BBC. Since then he has been a Guest Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Studies, a Guest Scholar and Visiting Fellow at the Brookings Institution, and Senior Fellow at the Trinity Forum and the EastWest Institute in New York. From 1986 to 1989, Os served as Executive Director of the Williamsburg Charter Foundation, a bicentennial celebration of the First Amendment. In this position he helped to draft “The Williamsburg Charter” and later “The Global Charter of Conscience,” which was published at the European Union Parliament in 2012.

Using Google to Track Isis - Oct 26th 2017

A TISS Dinner-Seminar featuring Christopher Bail, Duke University 

Where: Friday Center, Chapel Hill

When: 25 October, 2017 from 6:30 – 8:30 PM

To reserve a seat, please register online on or before 20 October. Registration will close automatically when all seats are filled or when the registration deadline is reached. You can get on a wait list by contacting  pumphrey@duke.edu

Register Now!

 

About the Speaker:

Chris Bail is the Douglas and Ellen Lowey Associate Professor of Sociology and Public Policy at Duke. His research examines how non-profit organizations and other political actors shape public discourse by analyzing large groups of texts from newspapers, television, public opinion surveys, and social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter. His research has been published by Princeton University Press, the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Sociological Review, and other leading publications. In 2017, he was one of 30 academics recognized worldwide by a prestigious Andrew Carnegie Fellowship. His work has also been recognized by awards from the American Sociological Association, the Association for Research on Non-Profit Organizations and Voluntary Action, the Society for the Scientific Study of Religion, and the Society for Study of Social Problems, and supported by the National Science Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Russell Sage Foundation. His research has also been covered by major media outlets such as NBC NewsNational Public Radio, and the Washington Post. Chris is also passionate about training the next generation of computational social scientists. He is the co-organizer of the 2017 Summer Institute in Computational Social Science at Princeton University and a founding member of Duke’s Interdisciplinary Data Science Program. Dr. Bail is currently studying the community-level predictors of violent extremism using Google search data, and how social networks influence political polarization on Twitter.

North Korea, Nuclear Weapons and War: Is this for real? Jim Walsh, MIT - Sep 27th 2017

Dr. Jim Walsh is a Senior Research Associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Security Studies Program (SSP).  Dr. Walsh’s research and writings focus on international security, and in particular, topics involving nuclear weapons, the Middle East, and East Asia. Dr. Walsh has testified before the United States Senate and House of Representatives on issues of nuclear terrorism, Iran, and North Korea. He is one of a handful of Americans who has traveled to both Iran and North Korea for talks with officials about nuclear issues. His recent publications include “Stopping North Korea, Inc.: Sanctions Effectiveness and Unintended Consequences” and “Rivals, Adversaries, and Partners: Iran and Iraq in the Middle East” in Iran and Its Neighbors. Before coming to MIT, Dr. Walsh was Executive Director of the Managing the Atom project at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government and a visiting scholar at the Center for Global Security Research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. He has taught at both Harvard University and MIT. Dr. Walsh received his Ph.D from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Sponsored by the School of Public & International Affairs, Department of Nuclear Engineering, and the Triangle Institute for Security Studies.
For more information please contact William Boettcher at william_boettcher@ncsu.edu.
 

The Growing National Threat: Iran & North Korea A Lecture with Frederick Fleitz - Oct 18th 2017

The Growing National Threat: Iran & North Korea
A Lecture with Frederick Fleitz

Hosted by the ICON Lecture Series

Tuesday, October 17 @ 7:00pm

Fred Fleitz is Senior Vice President of the Center for Security Policy, a non-profit Washington, D.C.-based nonpartisan national security think tank, where he focuses on the Iranian and North Korean nuclear programs, nonproliferation, the Middle East, terrorism, and intelligence reform. Fleitz served in U.S. national security positions for 25 years with CIA, DIA, the Department of State and the House Intelligence Committee staff.  During the administration of President George W. Bush, Fleitz was chief of staff to John Bolton, then Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security.

Partisan Politics or Reaching Across Party Lines – the Balancing Act for Trump’s Legislative Priorities: A Conversation with Paul Teller - Oct 19th 2017

Partisan Politics or Reaching Across Party Lines – the Balancing Act for Trump’s Legislative Priorities:
A Conversation with Paul Teller

Thursday, October 19 at 5:30pm

Sanford School 04
RSVP for Dinner after the event here *

 

Paul Teller graduated cum laude in 1993 from Duke University in Durham, NC, where he got his B.A. in political science.  Paul was the President of the Duke Club of Washington from 2008-2010 (and still serves on the Club’s board of directors, where he is focused on building the Duke Politics and Policy Network).  He served for four years on the Board of Directors of the Duke University Alumni Association—and was on the Board’s executive committee for one year of that.

In January 2014, he became Deputy Chief of Staff for U.S. Senator Ted Cruz, Republican from Texas—and in September 2014, the senator elevated him to Chief of Staff, where he served until August of 2016.  After a brief stint helping build two nonprofit organizations inspired by Senator Cruz’s nationwide grassroots network, President Donald Trump in January 2017 named him Special Assistant to the President for Legislative Affairs, where he operates in the White House as a conservative liaison to House and Senate conservatives—and to the Conservative Movement at large.

The Washington Post described Paul as “one of the most influential conservative aides in Congress.”  Roll Call newspaper twice named Paul as one of its “Fabulous 50” Hill staffers for 2012—and once again in 2013.  Paul was named “Capitol Hill Staffer of the Year” in 2012 at the Weyrich Awards Dinner, a gathering of top leaders of the Conservative Movement.  And The Hill newspaper recently profiled him upon his elevation to Senator Cruz’s chief of staff, calling Paul “the agitator-in-chief.”

Challenges to our National Security and Democracy: A Terry Sanford Distinguished Lecture with US Representative Adam Schiff - Oct 30th 2017

Challenges to our National Security and Democracy:
A Terry Sanford Distinguished Lecture with
US Representative Adam Schiff

Monday, October 30 at 5:30pm

Penn Pavilion

**Tickets are required for this event.  Please reach Melanie Benson or the Duke Box Office for your FREE ticket**

Hosted by the Sanford School of Public Policy in partnership with AGS, the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security, DeWitt Wallace Center for Media and Democracy, TISS, ICCAE and POLIS

Congressman Adam Schiff represents California’s 28th Congressional District, and throughout his tenure in Congress, he has focused on growing the economy, bolstering national security, strengthening our communities, helping small businesses, and improving education, safety and health care for our children. In his 9th term in the House of Representatives, Schiff currently serves as the Ranking Member, or top Democrat, of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence and as a Member of the Benghazi Select Committee. The House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence oversees the nation’s intelligence agencies including components of the Departments of Defense, Homeland Security, Justice, State and Energy. Schiff is currently on a leave of absence from the House Appropriations Committee.

The North Korean Nuclear Crisis and Dilemma of the Moon Jae-in Government - Oct 23rd 2017

The North Korean Nuclear Crisis and Dilemma of the Moon Jae-in Government

Hosted by the Program in Asian Security Studies

Monday, October 23 at 12:00pm

Executive Classroom in the JB Duke Hotel

Chung-in Moon is Distinguished University Professor at Yonsei University. His most recent publications include The Future of East Asia (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017) and What Does Japan Think Now? (in Korean 2013, in Chinese 2017). Dr. Moon was a special delegate to the first (2000) and second (2007) Inter-Korea summits held in Pyongyang. He also served as Ambassador for International Security Affairs of the Korean Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade and Chairman of the Presidential Committee on Northeast Asian Cooperation Initiative. Currently, he is the special advisor to the ROK president for foreign affairs and national security.

Perspectives on Leadership,” with GEN Bob Brown, Commander, U.S. Army Pacific - Oct 24th 2017

“Perspectives on Leadership,” with GEN Bob Brown, Commander, U.S. Army Pacific

Hosted by the Fuqua/Coach K Center on Leadership & Ethics (COLE)

Tuesday, October 242:30pm

Geneen Auditorium at The Fuqua School of Business
RSVP to attend this event

The Fuqua/Coach K Center on Leadership and Ethics is privileged to host GEN Bob Brown, Commander, U.S. Army Pacific on Tuesday, October 24 in the Geneen Auditorium to discuss “Perspectives on Leadership.” This event is free and open to the AGS community — please RSVP using the link above.

Careers in National Security: A Panel Discussion - Nov 07th 2017

“Careers in National Security: A Panel Discussion” 

Hosted by the Triangle Center on Terrorism and Homeland Security

Monday, November 6 @ 5pm

Rubenstein 200
RSVP to attend this event

Interested in a career in national security? Join the Triangle Center on Terrorism and Homeland Security for a panel discussion with current leaders in the field! Luke Hartig, Shannon Culbertson, Lisa Roman, Shawn Brimley, Loren Schulman and other leaders in the field will be joining us to share their experience, give practical insights and discuss what it takes to work in the realm of national security. A reception will follow the event in the Rubenstein 2nd floor lobby. Please RSVP with the link above, and feel free to contact katy.fanning@duke.edu if you have any questions.

Europe and Hungary: The Way Forward in the 21st Century - Nov 14th 2017

Europe and Hungary:
The Way Forward in the 21st Century

Monday, November 13 @ 6pm

Sanford 05

 

Dr. László Szabó was appointed Ambassador of Hungary to the United States in July 2017. Ambassador Dr. László Szabó previously served as Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs and Trade from 2014-2017. Before joining the political arena, Szabó built a wealth of experience in the corporate world as the Vice President of China HR with Eli Lilly and Company. He received his education from Medical University in Debrecen, Hungary (DOTE), graduating with an MD in 1990.

Transnational Terrorism Today – A Conference - Nov 11th 2017

The Richard M Krasno Distinguished Professorship at UNC-Chapel Hill, Prof. Klaus W Larres                                      in cooperation with Prof. Tobias Hof (DAAD Visiting Professor at UNC-CH) would like to invite you to an international conference this Thursday and Friday coming – November 9 and 10, 2017

TRANSNATIONAL TERRORISM TODAY:  HOW DO THE TRANSATLANTIC ALLIES DEAL WITH TERRORISM?

THURSDAY

When: November 9 @ 5.30pm (preceded by an opening reception at 4.30pm – all welcome)

Keynote address by Prof. Bruce Hoffman of Georgetown University: “The Transatlantic Alliance and Terrorism”

Where: Pleasants Family room, Wilson Library

 

FRIDAY

When: November 10, 2017

Panel discussions with distinguished international speakers:

9.30am – 11.30am:  The Global Terrorist Threat

1.00pm –  3.00pm:   Foreign Policy, Military Operations and Anti-Terrorism

3.30pm –  5.30pm:   Domestic Reactions to Terrorism – Differences, Similarities & Cooperation

6.00pm – 7.30pm:  Final Roundtable – “How can we deal with the Terrorist Threat?”

Where: FedEx Global Education Center, Room 4003

 

Details:

 

Please also see the flyer below and attached and this link:

http://jmce.unc.edu/ttt2017

 

ALL WELCOME – students, faculty, administrators, and certainly also members of the general public.

For those of you who are too far away or unable to attend, we will videotape all the talks and discussions for our
you tube channel. Please subscribe to our channel for free: www.youtube.com/KrasnoUNC

With our best wishes,

Klaus Larres & Tobias Hof